Bipolar Disorder Message Board

  • View author's info posted on Mar 09, 2008 12:28


    Quoting Belle2000:

    I am a 26 year old Bipolar and ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) female. I was diagnosed 2 years ago. I agree that writing helps my mental illness. For someone who is not Bipolar it is hard for them to understand why my moods change so often and why I don't have a reason for them changing. When I joined this sitte I had full intentions on having my picture online but I have not come to that point yet I still have a lot of self-esteem issues but some days I don't. Other people who are Bipolar tell me it gets better with age but it doesn't seem like it will.


    I like your point on this... I was made fun of by several on this site and it is cruel and sad people making fun of others about this... Nice to see I'm not alone...
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  • View author's info posted on Jul 21, 2007 05:39


    It's been my experience that "fuzzy Diagnosis codes" are applied to MI Issues, directly tied to $$$ available to treatment, under insurance.

    I am aware of "pressures' placed on LMHP's,et al, to nudge things to AXIS I Dx codes, due to re-imbursement schedules of Health Insurers. (ie BP treatment is a covered expense)

    Axis II disorders, such as BPD can "mimic" BP , although there are subtle differences (ie. length of duration,Intensity, control,etc) and they are not "Covered" expenses for Health Insurance.

    I am a survivor of a long-term BP/BPD marriage--a "Non" in the parlance of BPD.
    Dealing with the Psych community as a "Non" was/is difficult, as she would constantly change providers, once a clear picture of her true MI issues/Hx was present. The application of HIPPA does not help much either. Co-parenting is complex and difficult in this situation.

    Not a condemnation of the Professional MI community, rather an observation.

    Leaving Issues of Stigma aside, what can you offer "Non's/ Significant Others" and the patients themselves, to deal with the constant chaos and confusion presented by these difficult patients/ Spouses ??

    Kreiger, Lawson, et al write that distance, detachment, and boundaries are the most effective tools available to "Nons". Meanwhile ongoing distortion campaigns and manipulations make this an extremely difficult undertaking.

    Any insights you could provide would be appreciated.

    Thanks.
  • View author's info Photo Verified Certified Millionaire in 2014 posted on Mar 18, 2007 19:36


    Hello to the many bloggers on Bipolar Disorder. I'm a psychiatrist who wants to share the way we conceptualize the range of things that include bipolarity. It's not helpful to see it as purely biological, as at the least, the person and those involved with them have had their development changed by it. There've been psychosocial impacts and results, as well as the mood and irritability problems of the disorder. And, somewhat unfortunately, we don't know the full scope of benefit of the newer medications, but so much good has been done by them, that it's difficult to not try them in people whose mood problems really relate 1st to their personalities, and relationship excesses and deficits. So people get labeled as "Bipolar" to get insurances to pay for medication trials. And they do often help! So we have cures searching for diseases, while we retool and the field gets defined and expands. It's unfortunate that those who have the true bipolar disorders have to be associated with those who get that label as a secondary diagnosis. A great number of personality disordered people can be made available for psychotherapy, when their mood problems are stabilized a bit. Unfortunately, they often want to call themselves Bipolar. The same thing is true for those with schizophrenia, and "bipolar" meds are used there too. Interestingly, things are coming together with the meds for mood and thinking problems: Risperdal, Zyprexa, Seroquel, Geodon, and Abilify are all now approved for bipolar conditions, and Lithium, Tegretol, Depakote, and Lamictal often can help in the management of thinking disorders like schizophrenia, as well as those with personality disorders. The point I want to make: You make multiple diagnoses, and there's overlap with mood, thinking, and personality. Most people still need therapy no matter what brain problem is on "Axis I"; everybody still has a personality, on "Axis II". The mix of all, makes presentations and treatments complex & confusing.

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  • View author's info posted on Mar 16, 2007 10:28


    Very accurate poem for bi-polar. I myself and at least one of my daughters have been diagnosed. With the possibility of 2 more having it. I also suffer from PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder and ADD (attention deficit disorder) and a few minor compulsive disorders. My couselor informed me that it was actually common for people with bi-polar to have at least one more disorder if not mutiple ones. I also suffer with an ex-spouse who does not understand and thinks it is all just a bunch of crap. He doesn't comprehend that there are actually mental disorders and illnesses. But then again he is an alcoholic and addict along with a few other things. This has definitely made it hard for me and especially my daughters over the years as he has said derogitive things about the bi-polar. My daughters and I are one meds and each of us take different things. As someone else stated bi-polar effects each person differently. We are also recieving counseling. Someone stated that alot of times people stop taking the meds because they start getting better, this is true, but they also sometimes stop because they feel the meds are not helping. My daughter has done this in the past and her doctor and I have finally convinced her to not stop taking them untill we consult with the doctor first. It is very important to stay on the meds unless your doctor tells you to stop them. Well, I think I have rambled on enough now. Again the poem about bi-polar is an accurate one.
  • View author's info posted on Mar 05, 2007 19:15


    i would have to admit that i also have Bi-polor disorder. was told by doctors up at va in topeka kansas that I was by-polor but I also have post tramatict stress disordeer on top of the bi-polor disorder. I haave my good days and my bad days and up most nights at the truckstop here in Emporia Kansas. Every one have a good evening Catch every one later.
    Charlie
  • View author's info posted on Dec 30, 2006 19:03


    There are now some medical imaging tests that can very accurately diagnose bi-polar and other disorders. There is a Dr. Amen who runs a series of clinics that has done the most work. Search for Amen Clinic to find his web site. Sadly, these studies are not YET covered by insurance, however, as someone familiar with the technology, it works. It is similar to routine studies for heart problems and cancer. It has been around for 20 years, but for some reason, virtually no one is doing it even though each year there are about 40 to 50 studies published in peer reviewed journals. If anyone has any questions, feel free to email me. (No, I am not affiliated with Dr. Amen, though I do know people who work there.)
  • View author's info posted on Oct 07, 2006 13:55


    My son is Bipolar too. He was diagnosed 2 years ago. He is now 16 years old and doing a lot better on his medication. He is a brillant artist. He loves to make up his own comic book heroes and stories for them.He is very quiet and shy around people. His biggest fear is people will find out about his illness. He is ashamed that he has the illness. He is in counceling which helps a lot. I hope someday he will realize there is nothing to be ashamed of and that he will come out of his coccoon more beautiful than ever.
  • View author's info posted on Oct 07, 2006 13:48


    To BigBozMaam. I love your poem it sums everything up about Bipolar. I have had the illness all my life but I was only diagnosed 4 years ago. The diagnoses finally made my life make sense. All the weird thoughts and impulses I have had all my life. I cried when they finally diagnosed me. I stay on my medicine long enough to take the edge off and but not enough to clip my inspirational "wings". I love to write when I am soaring. I stay up all night sometimes. I just have to be careful of the "cranial" landings. The worst part of my illness is if I am having a "normal" bad day everyone asks "did you take your pill today?" I hate that. People need to realize that we do have "normal" bad days like them. If you want to try something interesting marry another Bipolar with different swings... life is never dull. Loving a Bipolar person is not hard just different.
  • View author's info posted on Jul 28, 2006 21:25


    Mental health issues need a lot of patience and strong boundaries. I think the hardest things include finding a good therapist and getting on the correct medicine and dosage. If I had a child or relative with mental health issues, I would have a brain scan done because too many people are miss diagnosed because some of the behaviors overlap into other disorders. The scan can tell the Drs. what part of the brain is not working correctly. The different disorders affect different areas of the brain.
    The sad thing is that a number of adults with mental health disorders stop taking their meds. One reason is that they are better so they feel they don't need them anymore when the meds are what is making them better. Other people just don't make any effort to help themselves.

    I work with kids with mental health issues, and I know parents have a long road ahead of them. Some parents will never get any rest.
  • View author's info posted on Jul 13, 2006 07:24


    Quick update --- son is still taking his meds on schedule and we haven't had any mood extremes since he's been on the meds. If only they had figured this out when he was 5 or 6 instead of 17----his life could've been much different up until now. I'm glad I stuck to my instincts as a mom and didn't throw him to the wolves!!

    Life is just beginning for him now!!
  • View author's info posted on Jun 03, 2006 15:58


    cutiepie01 write:
    There is a study being done that has shown great progress using timed release niacin for depression, shizophrenia and other mental disorders. Its important to use the timed release, but also the flush niacin gives a fast relief for other problems. Its all on the web, check it out.

    The website would be helpful if you have it.
  • View author's info posted on Jun 03, 2006 15:57


    BigBozMaam write:
    Lifesaver_notTHEcandy writes:

    Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

    Boz says.. "can I lay down on your couch"?

    Ahh...sure? I'm not a therapist however.
  • View author's info posted on Jun 03, 2006 09:42


    Lifesaver_notTHEcandy writes:

    Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

    Boz says.. "can I lay down on your couch"?

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  • View author's info posted on Jun 03, 2006 06:05


    Lifesaver_notTHEcandy write:
    I find that the biggest problem with any mental illness is the fact that the patients in question have difficulty accepting the fact that they "need" medication. Please allow me to say this.

    Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

    On another note. It should also be mentioned that once you find the correct medication that works for you, you need to speak to your doctor to decide if you should stay on it. Many patients start to feel better and stop taking their medication...and they soon start to have their old symptoms again.

    But please, do NOT feel as if you are an "outcast", there is nothing wrong with needing help with any health issue. This one in particular is very common and you are not alone.

    I agree with you wholeheartedly.....I could not have put it any more than you have already.....Well done..
  • View author's info posted on Jun 02, 2006 09:42


    I find that the biggest problem with any mental illness is the fact that the patients in question have difficulty accepting the fact that they "need" medication. Please allow me to say this.

    Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

    On another note. It should also be mentioned that once you find the correct medication that works for you, you need to speak to your doctor to decide if you should stay on it. Many patients start to feel better and stop taking their medication...and they soon start to have their old symptoms again.

    But please, do NOT feel as if you are an "outcast", there is nothing wrong with needing help with any health issue. This one in particular is very common and you are not alone.
  • View author's info posted on Jun 02, 2006 00:06


    Congrats to you. Not many people want to talk about the Bi- Polar disorder. I have been suffering from it for 8 yrs now. With medication, I am a happy, well balanced person. My ups and downs rarely show themselves. I was so angry at Tom Cruise for criticizing anyone who takes Psychotic drugs. When he gets his Master's in Psychology, then maybe I'll listen. I probably would not be alive today, if it weren't for my medications.
  • View author's info posted on Jun 01, 2006 10:25


    Wow! To read through the posts this far has been very touching to me. My son is 17 and just now has started medications for bipolar. He is my oldest and definitely has been a challenge through the years. I know there were signs when he was 4 and 5 years old. Doctors are hesitant to diagnose it as such at a young age because it is rare (or is it?). We have struggled with school attendance and mood swings for his whole life and on medication it's like he has a whole new life. I recognized the highs (giddyboy) and the very scary lows (2-3 day sleeping episodes). To my parents and my two other children we have accepted him as he is and maximize the good times to carry us through the bad. To others (including my ex--his dad) who look in from the outside and do not understand mental illness, we have endured countless hurtful comments. I have little mantras to get me through, such as "Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger.", "This too shall pass." "Make hay while the sun shines." and "Pick your battles--you can't win them all." My son is a beautiful person and the medication is helping others to see the person that my parents, his siblings and myself have seen all along. He is extremely intelligent and his vocabulary and verbal skills are unbelievable. Once the bipolar is managed and he adjusts to this new state of being, he will flourish and shine! I encourage any parent(s) that have a child such as this to truly show them unconditional love. It is not a "behavior problem" that can be corrected or should be punished. It is a medical condition that needs correct treatment. There are many "professionals" in the world that should not be licensed/certified in their line of work, so keep trying until you find the one that you can truly have confidence and trust to care for your child. After countless counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, etc, his adolescent pediatrician has hit the mark.
  • View author's info posted on May 27, 2006 00:56


    ~Bi Polar Gene~


    Everything i took,
    i wanted to give,
    Every time i die,
    i'd die to live,
    Down, to get happy,
    i'm happy when i'm down,
    Up, when i'm cryin',
    and laughin' when i frown...

    Librium, Depracote,
    i was born a misanthrope,
    Too extreme, in between, high anxiety,
    methedrine, morphine...
    bi-polar gene

    Stress kills,
    i'd kill when i'm stressed
    rollin' in the laughter,
    comin' undressed...

    Love suffers,
    i suffered my best,
    dyin' to get happy,
    i'm happy when i'm stressed...

    Librium, Deprocote...
    I was born with little hope,
    Too extreme, in between, high society
    Shooting star, way too far,
    bi-polar gene

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  • View author's info posted on May 23, 2006 10:33


    Bipolars are AWESOME lovers and set the standard in bed! aaah, smile, it's all good.
  • View author's info posted on May 22, 2006 16:29


    I am bipolar and yes I rather enjoy the giddiness that comes with my 'highs' but the lows are not fun at all =(
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