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Thank you for serving our county
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Posted on Tue, Dec 06, 2005 12:48

I just want to thank the men and woman who are serving our country, in all differnt ways. May our service men and woman be safe for the holidays and come home safe, to be with their familys. I know some MM people have children that our protecting our country they are the real stars.



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Posted on Fri, Dec 16, 2005 09:51

Hope they don't delete this picture again

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Posted on Thu, Dec 15, 2005 14:21

A picture my friend emailed me and little story to go with it. Something you won't see on CBS
What is it? See below the photo.........



This statue currently stands outside the Iraqi palace,
now home to the 4th Infantry division.
It will eventually be shipped home
and put in the memorial museum in Fort Hood, Texas.

The statue was created by an Iraqi artist named Kalat,
who for years was forced by Saddam Hussein to make
the many hundreds of bronze busts of Saddam that
dotted Baghdad.

Kalat was so grateful for the Americans liberation
of his country; he melted 3 of the heads of the
fallen Saddam and made the statue as a memorial
to the American soldiers and their fallen warriors.
Kalat worked on this memorial night and day for
several months.

To the left of the kneeling soldier is a small
Iraqi girl giving the soldier comfort as he mourns
the loss of his comrade in arms.

Do you know why we don't hear about this in the news?
Because it is heart warming and praise worthy.
The media avoids it because it does not have the
shock effect that a flashed breast or controversy
of politics does.

But we can do something about it.
We can pass this along to as many people as we can
in honor of all our brave military who are making a difference.
And please pass this on!



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Posted on Wed, Dec 07, 2005 16:23

Mr. Bill I liked this article that he wrote.

  


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Posted on Wed, Dec 07, 2005 12:30

billzeke write:
I am not a big fan of Ben Stein, but if you two like him he is usually on Neil Cavuto's Saturday morning business segment on FNC.


I watch him on Fox on several different shows. He is on Cavuto's afternoon show quite a bit.

I have to watch ESPN2 on Saturday mornings to continue my education on bass fishing.



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Posted on Wed, Dec 07, 2005 04:41

I am not a big fan of Ben Stein, but if you two like him he is usually on Neil Cavuto's Saturday morning business segment on FNC.



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Posted on Tue, Dec 06, 2005 23:56

I need to give credit for the above picture to a very wonderful, patriotic lady. LindaSOG, at the time a member and a wonderful friend on Free Republic made this image using a picture she took of herself.



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Posted on Tue, Dec 06, 2005 23:52

unsnaggedeagle write:
I just want to thank the men and woman who are serving our country, in all differnt ways. May our service men and woman be safe for the holidays and come home safe, to be with their familys. I know some MM people have children that our protecting our country they are the real stars.


Thank you Miss Eagle. God bless you and Ben Stein.

A quote from one of the greatest of heroes: "Duty then is the sublimest of words, no one can do more and no one should ever aspire to do less." Robert E. Lee in a letter to his wife.

You have know idea what your kind words mean to those of us that spent our entire lives in the military. My father served 27 years as an Army helicopter pilot. Including 3 tours as a medivac pilot in Viet Nam and 18 months flying medivac in Korea. I spent 24 years in Army, including 18 months in Viet Nam. Although unpleasant at times I would never exchange what I did during my career for anything else.

No one ever said thank you or welcome home until I rode on a float in Portsmouth, NH after Desert Storm. No one ever said thank you, nor did any of us expect anyone to. We simply did our duty. The tears we all shed after that parade as we hugged each other probably raised the level of the Piscataqua River a few inches, but they were tears of joy. We were finally accepted and welcomed home.

On behalf of the young men and women that today do their duty so well, without question, I say thank you.

One thing I want to urge everyone to do on behalf of the disabled veterans every where is to become a part of the overwatch on Congress. I am a 100% disabled veteran. I help coach my sons baseball team and two weeks ago we were practicing in the field house at the high school. I wasn't paying attention as usual and was hit in the mouth by a baseball. A tooth was knocked out. When I went to the VA hospital to have it repaired I was told I was no longer eligible for dental care. If that happened to me it has happened to thousands of others. I can only guess that none of us have any medical or dental insurance other than what we were promised by the VA. I came here to have fun on the forums. I am living on my VA disability and half of the 30% of my retirement that Congress so generously gave back to us. I am probably as fiscally embarrassed as anyone on this site. I want nothing on my behalf but please, everyone, try to help those that gave so much.

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Posted on Tue, Dec 06, 2005 12:48

For many years Ben Stein has written a biweekly column called "Monday Night At Morton's." (Morton's is a famous chain of Steakhouses known to be frequented by movie stars and famous people from around the globe.) Now, Ben is terminating the column to move on to other things in his life. Reading his final column is worth a few minutes of your time.

Ben Stein's Last Column...
============================================
How Can Someone Who Lives in Insane Luxury Be a Star in Today's World?

As I begin to write this, I "slug" it, as we writers say, which means I put a heading on top of the document to identify it. This heading is "eonlineFINAL," and it gives me a shiver to write it. I have been doing this column for so long that I cannot even recall when I started. I loved writing this column so much for so long I came to believe it would never end.

It worked well for a long time, but gradually, my changing as a person and the world's change have overtaken it. On a small scale, Morton's, while better than ever, no longer attracts as many stars as it used to. It still brings in the rich people in droves and definitely some stars. I saw Samuel L. Jackson there a few days ago, and we had a nice visit, and right before that, I saw and had a splendid talk with Warren Beatty in an elevator, in which we agreed that Splendor in the Grass was a super movie. But Morton's is not the star galaxy it once was, though it probably will be again.


Beyond that, a bigger change has happened. I no longer think Hollywood stars are terribly important. They are uniformly pleasant, friendly people, and they treat me better than I deserve to be treated. But a man or woman who makes a huge wage for memorizing lines and reciting them in front of a camera is no longer my idea of a shining star we should all look up to.

How can a man or woman who makes an eight-figure wage and lives in insane luxury really be a star in today's world, if by a "star" we mean someone bright and powerful and attractive as a role model? Real stars are not riding around in the backs of limousines or in Porsches or getting trained in yoga or Pilates and eating only raw fruit while they have Vietnamese girls do their nails.

They can be interesting, nice people, but they are not heroes to me any longer. A real star is the soldier of the 4th Infantry Division who poked his head into a hole on a farm near Tikrit, Iraq. He could have been met by a bomb or a hail of AK-47 bullets. Instead, he faced an abject Saddam Hussein and the gratitude of all of the decent people of the world.

A real star is the U.S. soldier who was sent to disarm a bomb next to a road north of Baghdad. He approached it, and the bomb went off and killed him.

A real star, the kind who haunts my memory night and day, is the U.S. soldier in Baghdad who saw a little girl playing with a piece of unexploded ordnance on a street near where he was guarding a station. He pushed her aside and threw himself on it just as it exploded. He left a family desolate in California and a little girl alive in Baghdad.

The stars who deserve media attention are not the ones who have lavish weddings on TV but the ones who patrol the streets of Mosul even after two of their buddies were murdered and their bodies battered and stripped for the sin of trying to protect Iraqis from terrorists.

We put couples with incomes of $100 million a year on the covers of our magazines. The noncoms and officers who barely scrape by on military pay but stand on guard in Afghanistan and Iraq and on ships and in submarines and near the Arctic Circle are anonymous as they live and die.

I am no longer comfortable being a part of the system that has such poor values, and I do not want to perpetuate those values by pretending that who is eating at Morton's is a big subject.

There are plenty of other stars in the American firmament...the policemen and women who go off on patrol in South Central and have no idea if they will return alive; the orderlies and paramedics who bring in people who have been in terrible accidents and prepare them for surgery; the teachers and nurses who throw their whole spirits into caring for autistic children; the kind men and women who work in hospices and in cancer wards.

Think of each and every fireman who was running up the stairs at the World Trade Center as the towers began to collapse. Now you have my idea of a real hero.

I came to realize that life lived to help others is the only one that matters. This is my highest and best use as a human. I can put it another way. Years ago, I realized I could never be as great an actor as Olivier or as good a comic as Steve Martin...or Martin Mull or Fred Willard--or as good an economist as Samuelson or Friedman or as good a writer as Fitzgerald. Or even remotely close to any of them.

But I could be a devoted father to my son, husband to my wife and, above all, a good son to the parents who had done so much for me. This came to be my main task in life. I did it moderately well with my son, pretty well with my wife and well indeed with my parents (with my sister's help). I cared for and paid attention to them in their declining years. I stayed with my father as he got sick, went into extremis and then into a coma and then entered immortality with my sister and me reading him the Psalms.

This was the only point at which my life touched the lives of the soldiers in Iraq or the firefighters in New York. I came to realize that life lived to help others is the only one that matters and that it is my duty, in return for the lavish life God has devolved upon me, to help others He has placed in my path. This is my highest and best use as a human.


Faith is not believing that God can. It is knowing that God will.
By Ben Stein

Also:


We truly take a lot for granted.
Forget the Hollywood "stars" and the sports "heroes"...



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