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Ladies Investing Made Fun!
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Posted on Sun, Sep 25, 2005 15:31

If you have never invested before, do not feel you have enough money to invest on your own, or the knowledge of how to invest, but you've always had a desire to want to learn and start a portfolio...here is a fun suggestion of how you can start.

Ask several of your friends if they would be interested in joining you in an investment club. A good number would be 5 to 10 people. You meet monthly for either lunch or dinner. It becomes ladies quality time spent together. Contact a reputable brokerage company, and ask them if one of their brokers who is noted for making good investments for their clients (at least 5 yrs experience) would undertake to join your group, in order to instruct all of you in making educated decisions for investing. The advantage for them doing this is that all of you may become potential future clients.
Your group will pool their money in order to make real investments with the help of your appointed broker. At your first meeting, your group will decide on the amount each person must contribute monthly toward making your group investments, which each of you will track the particular stocks progress. As little as $25.00/month can be contributed by each person. There are plenty of penny & dollar stocks to invest in, which do not require tons of cash. The money you invest must be cash that you can afford to lose, should your group choose a stock that drops in value. On the other hand, if the stock goes up, you earn money, which at the point of sale is then divided up equally amongst all investors.

If anything, you will have a fun ladies night out, and gain valuable knowledge that you can apply to your life, even pass onto your children.



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Posted on Mon, Oct 03, 2005 05:41

sharp1 write:

I have alot to learn about investing myself Ecam.
I tend to invest in what I know and understand, and knowing who the people are running the company. The stock market is deviating into an area I know nothing about, which gives me a feeling of being lost. I don't like feeling lost!
So gradually I'll learn, and possibly make it work for me too.



Hmm one of the world's richest men Warren Buffett only invests in companies he understands so you are running in good company.


Take care now.

  


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Posted on Thu, Sep 29, 2005 08:51


Ecam write:
sharp1 write:
I agree with you there! I am not familiar with the two names you mentioned, but others living in that area may want to take the opportunity to check them out.

Thanks Ecam.



Hmm Sharp 1 these two money managers are amongst the most famous in Canada although both have a tainted past, however I'd trust both in their investment judgments and style. Sadly both of them should be managing my portfolio but my procrastination has prevented it so far.

You seem from your various posts to have a good head on your shoulders and a good handle on the financial side of things.

Take care now..

billzeke

Thanks, I guess great minds think alike.. lol Ah sharp is going to get excited about this remark so I'd better head back to the joke section to stay out of trouble. lol


I have alot to learn about investing myself Ecam.
I tend to invest in what I know and understand, and knowing who the people are running the company. The stock market is deviating into an area I know nothing about, which gives me a feeling of being lost. I don't like feeling lost!
So gradually I'll learn, and possibly make it work for me too.



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Posted on Wed, Sep 28, 2005 15:32

sharp1 write:
I agree with you there! I am not familiar with the two names you mentioned, but others living in that area may want to take the opportunity to check them out.

Thanks Ecam.



Hmm Sharp 1 these two money managers are amongst the most famous in Canada although both have a tainted past, however I'd trust both in their investment judgments and style. Sadly both of them should be managing my portfolio but my procrastination has prevented it so far.

You seem from your various posts to have a good head on your shoulders and a good handle on the financial side of things.

Take care now..

billzeke

Thanks, I guess great minds think alike.. lol Ah sharp is going to get excited about this remark so I'd better head back to the joke section to stay out of trouble. lol

  


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Posted on Wed, Sep 28, 2005 14:06


billzeke write:

Yes. That was a very good post by Ecam, especially the part where he says "nobody looks after your money as well as yourself." It is one of the most important lessons that I have learned about investing. When only I touch my money, I always end up with more money than I do when somebody else touches it.



That is one of the most important lessons for each of us to learn. Why is it most of us have to learn it the hard way?

  


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Posted on Wed, Sep 28, 2005 09:17


sharp1 write:

Ecam write:
Hmm some good thoughts however I might add that no one looks after your own money as well as yourself as you have a vested personal interest in the out come. From what I've read on the subject the most successful investing clubs are the ones where the membership does their homework and actually comes up with the ideas backed by their research before making any investment. In short it requires a lot of work on the part of the membership to be really successful...

I personally only favor investment managers that have invested their own money in their own funds with great long term track records such as Frank Mersch or Veronika Hirsch. And no, I don't always follow my own advice sometimes I wish I did..


Ecam, it is meant as a learning experience. The broker who joins your group should be providing the information regarding how to go about research the companies your group is considering investing in. Remember these are small investments being made to enhance the course. Small steps lead to larger steps. Once a group becomes adept at researching companies, then they may be able to move on to picking and choosing which companies they want to invest in.
When people learn to swim they take lessons, one step at a time. They don't jump into the deep end and pray they float! lol

"no one looks after your own money as well as yourself as you have a vested personal interest in the out come." --
I totally agree!

"In short it requires a lot of work on the part of the membership to be really successful..." --
Yes, there must be strong interest in a group to want to learn. Most women are not truly interested, but their are some. It's a chance or opportunity and a way to take charge of their own finances and make their money work for them!

"I personally only favor investment managers that have invested their own money in their own funds with great long term track records"

I agree with you there! I am not familiar with the two names you mentioned, but others living in that area may want to take the opportunity to check them out.

Thanks Ecam.



Yes. That was a very good post by Ecam, especially the part where he says "nobody looks after your money as well as yourself." It is one of the most important lessons that I have learned about investing. When only I touch my money, I always end up with more money than I do when somebody else touches it.



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Posted on Wed, Sep 28, 2005 08:31


Ecam write:
Hmm some good thoughts however I might add that no one looks after your own money as well as yourself as you have a vested personal interest in the out come. From what I've read on the subject the most successful investing clubs are the ones where the membership does their homework and actually comes up with the ideas backed by their research before making any investment. In short it requires a lot of work on the part of the membership to be really successful...

I personally only favor investment managers that have invested their own money in their own funds with great long term track records such as Frank Mersch or Veronika Hirsch. And no, I don't always follow my own advice sometimes I wish I did..


Ecam, it is meant as a learning experience. The broker who joins your group should be providing the information regarding how to go about research the companies your group is considering investing in. Remember these are small investments being made to enhance the course. Small steps lead to larger steps. Once a group becomes adept at researching companies, then they may be able to move on to picking and choosing which companies they want to invest in.
When people learn to swim they take lessons, one step at a time. They don't jump into the deep end and pray they float! lol

"no one looks after your own money as well as yourself as you have a vested personal interest in the out come." --
I totally agree!

"In short it requires a lot of work on the part of the membership to be really successful..." --
Yes, there must be strong interest in a group to want to learn. Most women are not truly interested, but their are some. It's a chance or opportunity and a way to take charge of their own finances and make their money work for them!

"I personally only favor investment managers that have invested their own money in their own funds with great long term track records"

I agree with you there! I am not familiar with the two names you mentioned, but others living in that area may want to take the opportunity to check them out.

Thanks Ecam.



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Posted on Tue, Sep 27, 2005 21:26

Goodlife,
You are hired...I HATE dealing with money stuff....like uhhh what to do with it....this makes me nervous, I think I have investing dyslexia....
or something....It is easier for me to spend it all than to try to save because it goes up then down. then up a little and teases you into thinking it will continue to go up, then it fails again and you lose more...see...
it is easier to spend it.

Bonnie and you Goodlife....ladies finiancial consultants....keep the good advice coming....

Love lucky!

  


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Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2005 21:17

That is because women are generally better at housekeeping , balancing the budget at home and meticulous with details. We take care of the pennies so the big issues are an extension of that.
Insurance for women drivers of the mid-age range is cheaper too for that same reason.
It is a pity not more women run huge corporations and countries..we would certainly think twice about sending our sons to war or invest in warfare to kill other mothers' kids..



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Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2005 06:39

BBC News, UK edition, 3 June 2005:

Women investors are consistently better at investing in shares than men, a survey has said.
The study, by financial website Digital Look, said women were more successful because they tended to back a balanced portfolio instead of more risky stocks.
The average woman's share portfolio grew by 17% in the year to 27 May, the survey found, while the average man's rose by just 11%.
Over the same period, the FTSE Allshare index climbed by 13%.
Balancing act
The survey - which analysed more than 100,000 portfolios - found that women built up balanced share collections, favouring leisure, food and drink, and utility firms.
In contrast, men tended to favour stock market "fads", backing stocks in sectors such as mining and oil and gas. These shares are more vulnerable to wider price swings, Digital Look said, and have lost ground in recent months.
The study noted many men have "had their fingers burnt" by not building up a balanced portfolio of shares.
The same survey last year produced similar results, with the average woman's portfolio rising 10% - compared with a 7% rise in the FTSE Allshare index and a 6% climb in the average man's share collection.
A previous survey in 2001 had also found women outperforming the market.
"While men tend to take more risks with their hard earned savings, women take a more balanced and considered view, and time and again it pays dividends," said, Andy Yates, director at Digital Look.



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Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2005 04:26

Hmm some good thoughts however I might add that no one looks after your own money as well as yourself as you have a vested personal interest in the out come. From what I've read on the subject the most successful investing clubs are the ones where the membership does their homework and actually comes up with the ideas backed by their research before making any investment. In short it requires a lot of work on the part of the membership to be really successful...

I personally only favor investment managers that have invested their own money in their own funds with great long term track records such as Frank Mersch or Veronika Hirsch. And no, I don't always follow my own advice sometimes I wish I did..

  


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