Katrina Slams the "Big Easy" Message Board

  • View author's info Author posted on Aug 28, 2005 23:21


    Just Hours from now, Mid morning on August 29th, Hurricane Katrina will Hit New Orleans with 125mph winds and the water level is expected to rise 25ft in coastal areas.They are expecting almost total devastation as this is one of the most powerful storms ever charted.

    Some of my family in Covington has mandatory evacuations, and they are almost 100 miles inland. Gonna be a bad one. Hope they all get out of town OK

    Since there are 40% of our oil refineries there, A gallon of gas is expected to rise 25 cents a gallon.

    Hope and Pray for the best.
  • 98Comments

  • View author's info posted on Sep 13, 2005 21:28


    No Kiddin..I was trying to get them to think ahead...It could take years to find someone to er_ect (Can't use this word either...LOL) your structure back...and then it will never be the same... or how you wanted it.

    Many pitfalls await during re-construction.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 13, 2005 09:31


    Probably the only answer is to be your own contractor. Hire the different skilled people direct, whereever and whenever you can find them. That is not fun either, but it's what I do because it gives you a little more control over the situtation.

    Rebuilding is going to be a mess beyond belief, fursure.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 13, 2005 07:52


    I had heard the same thing happened after Hurricane Hugo...That getting someone to rebuild was almost impossible and 18 month motel stays were not uncommon.

    I believe the latest reports are over 1/2 a million homeless...Thats alot of houses.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 13, 2005 00:02


    Houston had 50,000 houses flooded in 2001, which is nothing compared to this loss. About the soonest anyone had their house restored by a contractor was six weeks, and many took a year or year and a half. That was with a army of people working all over the city.

    Some contractors would take the job and then just send one guy over to work for about two days per week. They could not possible do all the houses they contracted to do. Advise anyone to make sure the contract calls for a completion date with a penality clause for being late.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 12, 2005 12:47


    After 14 days I finally find out they've got 14ft of water in their town, With the same levee that held it back-now holding it in. Poetic, almost.

    Am waiting to hear if they need help re-constructing. Have offered to come down there with a crew and put up a house in 2 weeks and leave the motorhome for them. Finding contractors will become a major problem soon, Even waving insurance checks won't guarantee you'll get someone to start work in the near future.

    Have ample volunteers to help do an old fashioned "barn raising". My town will probably load the motorhome to the hilt with donated items to bring with us. All they have to do is ask....
  • View author's info posted on Sep 11, 2005 22:04


    Thanks for the post Mich, and I totally agree. I hope you play it safe and stay safe. Write if I can help U with anything. I am in Houston.

    If you need anything to repair your relatives place, I can recomment Maintenance USA (owned by and same as Barnett) for a lot of my purchases to maintain or repair property. The have warehouses in many major cities. They have AC/heating, electrical, plumbing, electrical controls, -- 15,000 thousand items. 1-800-283-40*00. Shaw is my sales rep. They will deliver almost anywhere free via shipping companies if you have a address they can find and if trucking companies are operating in the area now.

    their web site is www*e-musa*com
  • View author's info posted on Sep 11, 2005 10:13


    Contradictions abound. Black/white, rich/poor, healthy/sick, old/young, but all with one common thread,,,gratefully surviving to build a new life. I'm back in Lacombe La. after being evaced for a respiratory condition myself. I've seen it all here,,,the good the bad and the ugly. There's blame enough to go around for years to come for the early failures but for now the focus is on putting these peoples lives back together and the rest (biased politics) is backburner fodder to the fine folks in the traumatized community i'm in. No looting, raping,or violations of humanity here since day one. I've witnessed more acts of unselfish kindness and generosity to help complete strangers in this short time than most are privy to in a lifetime and i'm having real difficulty to understand the hostilities of people hundreds and thousands of miles removed from all this, sitting in front of the bo*ob tube to conclude its basically a failed effort. Mistakes were made and some will continue, needless life was likely lost and this also will continue to some degree but to jump on the naysayers bandwagon, demanding accountability, even as life saving and restoration efforts continue, smacks of small mindedness and a direct slap in the face to the thousands of volunteers as well as those 99.7 % most directly dealing with personal loss who have exemplified the true American spirit of pulling together like no other people on the face of the planet, in the face of human adversity. I've seen it,,,,i've lived and breathed it for almost 2 weeks and no amount of disingenuous pandering of 20/20 hindsite is appropriate until such time lives are no longer still in danger and basic needs have been restored,,,,,,,,,,at least in this one mans humble opinion.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 10, 2005 20:34


    Robotic, 333smile gave you about 20 churches that were open, no one wants to get on the ships, the Astrodome is under control, yes there will be money wasted, probably lots of it, but now is not the time to worry about it. Instead, lets think of all the free labor, housing, shelters, help in shelters plus material and manpower donated by people all over the US, Canada, Mexico, Europe, in etc. and lets thank them for it.
  • View author's info Photo Verified posted on Sep 10, 2005 10:35


    Robotic,

    You're such a downer! Why not lighten up?
  • View author's info posted on Sep 10, 2005 10:18


    Those cruise ships are going to have millions of dollars worth of damage and looting. Just wait for the news on what happens to them. They'll be lucky to stay afloat.

    I'll bet those captains are furious, beside themselves. I'll bet they feel like a father with his hands tied behind his back watching his daughter being rap*ed.

    I feel certain that right here in Houston Reliant Stadium, The Astrodome, and the George R. Brown Convention Center will also sustain hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of damage and looting.

    And it'll be your and my taxes paying for the damage.

    I haven't heard of any churches, major or minor, taking in refugees. They couldn't stand the damage.

    When A&M took in refugees President Gates had them vetted and wanded, twice, and then a non-student accompanies every refugee when they go anywhere on campus. Now that is smart. I congratulate you President Gates.

    I see by the Houston Chronicle today the Federal Government is finally spending or thinking about spending millions of dollars checking on where the billions of dollars have and are going. The horse is out of the gate. And they are looking for it. They don't even know where it went.

    It'll be like hundred dollar hammers and thousand dollar toilets.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 22:39



    robotic123_74 write:
    I have no idea what that product is but I doubt it would affect both a bacteria and a virus. A virus and a bacteria are totally different things. A bacteria is a living organism, a virus is not. There is no such thing as an anti-virotic that I know of but there are several anti-biotics.

    You can be vaccinated or even catch a virus and your body develops antibodies against it but there is no anti-virotic that I know of.

    An anti-biotic works directly against the biological organism such as a bacteria.




    This is not true. You are thinking about killing both bacteria and viruses after they enter the bloodstream. Think of prevention -- before it enters the blood, say killing stuff in the New Orleans water for instance. There are many things, that will kill both. For instance, look up provine iodine, used as a surgicial scrub. Don't drink it however, - horrible death. They are many things that will kill both, but some are not safe to use. This product is suppose to be extremely safe - you can even drink it in very dilute solutions. I brush my teeth with it all the time,use it in my A/C ducts to kill mold and bacteria, etc. etc.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 22:12


    There is a fungus among us.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 21:17


    I have no idea what that product is but I doubt it would affect both a bacteria and a virus. A virus and a bacteria are totally different things. A bacteria is a living organism, a virus is not. There is no such thing as an anti-virotic that I know of but there are several anti-biotics.

    You can be vaccinated or even catch a virus and your body develops antibodies against it but there is no anti-virotic that I know of.

    An anti-biotic works directly against the biological organism such as a bacteria.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 21:11


    Heard from Cajun..Finally. Katie, He's OK.
    E-mail sent 8-31-05;

    Hey Cajun, Hope you guys are allright down there in Houma. My Family up in Slidell got washed out pretty good and we can't get ahold of anyone by phone yet. Haven't heard a thing about Grand Isle or Houma on the news. Those dumb sh*ts are shooting at the Helicopters sent to rescue them and holding up the evacuation of New Orleans.. Cub and Dave and I, all our prayers are with you and you're familiy that you'all are OK...Pete
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    E-Mail returned 9-09-05
    thanks wright wqoof pal my prayers ae with your family in slidell to we were hoping for the worst and we got it they were predicting this for over a xdecade thats why i am mad some of these politacians down heer don't understand cement leveys will work the roof blew off the house me and my father stayed home we have a generator and equiped for this but if it would have been a little more to the west we would be gone like new orleans iam 100 miles from them we have lots of wind damage down here. i just got my pc back internet working back we were out of lights for 5 days man
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 18:18



    WrightWoodPT write:
    They're all alive but....

    Finally, almost 10 days later a line of communication opened and we heard through a 3rd party that our relatives were safe but shattered in the North Shore of Lake Ponchatrain.

    Like we thought , they stayed in close to protect and salvaage and help out the less fortunate. While they suffered home loss and major destruction they are already rebuilding and lining up temporary trailers to live out of until they can rebuild. They were part of the 50% who evacuated and rode it out far_ther North , then faced monstrous traffic when they returned. Thank God.

    They reported the damage is beyond you're wildest guess and they worry their small town may never recover.

    It will still be weeks until the phones are working.



    Thank God! WWPT!! I'm very happy for you!!
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 18:17



    robotic123_74 write:
    Maybe the reason I can't find much sympathy in myself for those people is because I was a dirt dog poor poverty stricken kid myself and I lived with the mosquitoes, flies, bed bugs, rats, mice, termites, snakes and all the rest. I was raised in the poorest family I knew of anywhere. We had no bathroom. Not even an outdoor privy, most of the time, we just went out into the woods. We didn't have a water well, we hauled water to drink from a windmill down the road in buckets we carried by hand. I didn't take baths until I went to college and I don't remember bathing a lot there. It wasn't until I got into the Navy that I bathed regularly. I was the first kid of any of my family on either side that I knew of who ever graduated from high school. I was poor until I got out on my own. And I didn't have much for a long time after that. I could write a book on poverty, my kind of poverty. It's dirty, it's smelly and you don't have enough of anything that costs money. I lived that way for years and years. I am not rich now but I am fairly comfortable middle class I guess.

    well robotic thats how my fater and his family were raised, but he made something out of his self he did not let it get him down, and a uncle of mine till his death has the powerfullest construction company inthe town of dulac louisiana till his death which his wife and kids took over my moms sister. robotic does it say in the biblw where diaster will come to sin city new orleans one day and it will be destroyed before the end of the world
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 18:10



    statuesque4u write:
    An Unnatural Disaster: A Hurricane Exposes the Man-Made Disaster of the Welfare State

    Sep 02, 2005
    by Robert Tracinski

    It has taken four long days for state and federal officials to figure out how to deal with the disaster in New Orleans. I can't blame them, because it has also taken me four long days to figure out what is going on there. The reason is that the events there make no sense if you think that we are confronting a natural disaster.

    If this is just a natural disaster, the response for public officials is obvious: you bring in food, water, and doctors; you send transportation to evacuate refugees to temporary shelters; you send engineers to stop the flooding and rebuild the city's infrastructure. For journalists, natural disasters also have a familiar pattern: the heroism of ordinary people pulling together to survive; the hard work and dedication of doctors, nurses, and rescue workers; the steps being taken to clean up and rebuild.

    Public officials did not expect that the first thing they would have to do is to send thousands of armed troops in armored vehicle, as if they are suppressing an enemy insurgency. And journalists--myself included--did not expect that the story would not be about rain, wind, and flooding, but about ra*pe, murder, and looting.

    But this is not a natural disaster. It is a man-made disaster.

    The man-made disaster is not an inadequate or incompetent response by federal relief agencies, and it was not directly caused by Hurricane Katrina. This is where just about every newspaper and television channel has gotten the story wrong.

    The man-made disaster we are now witnessing in New Orleans did not happen over the past four days. It happened over the past four decades. Hurricane Katrina merely exposed it to public view.

    The man-made disaster is the welfare state.

    For the past few days, I have found the news from New Orleans to be confusing. People were not behaving as you would expect them to behave in an emergency--indeed, they were not behaving as they have behaved in other emergencies. That is what has shocked so many people: they have been saying that this is not what we expect from America. In fact, it is not even what we expect from a Third World country.

    When confronted with a disaster, people usually rise to the occasion. They work together to rescue people in danger, and they spontaneously organize to keep order and solve problems. This is especially true in America. We are an enterprising people, used to relying on our own initiative rather than waiting around for the government to take care of us. I have seen this a hundred times, in small examples (a small town whose main traffic light had gone out, causing ordinary citizens to get out of their cars and serve as impromptu traffic cops, directing cars through the intersection) and large ones (the spontaneous response of New Yorkers to September 11).

    So what explains the chaos in New Orleans?

    To give you an idea of the magnitude of what is going on, here is a description from a Washington Times story:

    "Storm victims are ra*ped and beaten; fights erupt with flying fists, knives and guns; fires are breaking out; corpses litter the streets; and police and rescue helicopters are repeatedly fired on.

    "The plea from Mayor C. Ray Nagin came even as National Guardsmen poured in to restore order and stop the looting, carjackings and gunfire....
    "Last night, Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco said 300 Iraq-hardened Arkansas National Guard members were inside New Orleans with shoot-to-kill orders." 'These troops are...under my orders to restore order in the streets,' she said. 'They have M-16s, and they are locked and loaded. These troops know how to shoot and kill and they are more than willing to do so if necessary and I expect they will.' "

    The reference to Iraq is eerie. The photo that accompanies this article shows National Guard troops, with rifles and armored vests, riding on an armored vehicle through trash-strewn streets lined by a rabble of squalid, listless people, one of whom appears to be yelling at them. It looks exactly like a scene from Sadr City in Baghdad.

    What explains bands of thugs using a natural disaster as an excuse for an orgy of looting, armed robbery, and ra*pe? What causes unruly mobs to storm the very buses that have arrived to evacuate them, causing the drivers to drive away, frightened for their lives? What causes people to attack the doctors trying to treat patients at the Super Dome?

    Why are people responding to natural destruction by causing further destruction? Why are they attacking the people who are trying to help them?

    My wife, Sherri, figured it out first, and she figured it out on a sense-of-life level. While watching the coverage last night on Fox News Channel, she told me that she was getting a familiar feeling. She studied architecture at the Illinois Institute of Chicago, which is located in the South Side of Chicago just blocks away from the Robert Taylor Homes, one of the largest high-rise public housing projects in America. "The projects," as they were known, were infamous for uncontrollable crime and irremediable squalor. (They have since, mercifully, been demolished.)

    What Sherri was getting from last night's television coverage was a whiff of the sense of life of "the projects." Then the "crawl"--the informational phrases flashed at the bottom of the screen on most news channels--gave some vital statistics to confirm this sense: 75% of the residents of New Orleans had already evacuated before the hurricane, and of the 300,000 or so who remained, a large number were from the city's public housing projects. Jack Wakeland then gave me an additional, crucial fact: early reports from CNN and Fox indicated that the city had no plan for evacuating all of the prisoners in the city's jails--so they just let many of them loose. There is no doubt a significant overlap between these two populations--that is, a large number of people in the jails used to live in the housing projects, and vice versa.

    There were many decent, innocent people trapped in New Orleans when the deluge hit--but they were trapped alongside large numbers of people from two groups: criminals--and wards of the welfare state, people selected, over decades, for their lack of initiative and self-induced helplessness. The welfare wards were a mass of sheep--on whom the incompetent administration of New Orleans unleashed a pack of wolves.

    All of this is related, incidentally, to the apparent incompetence of the city government, which failed to plan for a total evacuation of the city, despite the knowledge that this might be necessary. But in a city corrupted by the welfare state, the job of city officials is to ensure the flow of handouts to welfare recipients and patronage to political supporters--not to ensure a lawful, orderly evacuation in case of emergency.

    No one has really reported this story, as far as I can tell. In fact, some are already actively distorting it, blaming President Bush, for example, for failing to personally ensure that the Mayor of New Orleans had drafted an adequate evacuation plan. The worst example is an execrable piece from the Toronto Globe and Mail, by a supercilious Canadian who blames the chaos on American "individualism." But the truth is precisely the opposite: the chaos was caused by a system that was the exact opposite of individualism.

    What Hurricane Katrina exposed was the psychological consequences of the welfare state. What we consider "normal" behavior in an emergency is behavior that is normal for people who have values and take the responsibility to pursue and protect them. People with values respond to a disaster by fighting against it and doing whatever it takes to overcome the difficulties they face. They don't sit around and complain that the government hasn't taken care of them. They don't use the chaos of a disaster as an opportunity to prey on their fellow men.

    But what about criminals and welfare parasites? Do they worry about saving their houses and property? They don't, because they don't own anything. Do they worry about what is going to happen to their businesses or how they are going to make a living? They never worried about those things before. Do they worry about crime and looting? But living off of stolen wealth is a way of life for them.

    The welfare state--and the brutish, uncivilized mentality it sustains and encourages--is the man-made disaster that explains the moral ugliness that has swamped New Orleans. And that is the story that no one is reporting.


    Source: TIA Daily -- September 2, 2005

    well statuesque4u that was aron nevile's sister complaining she was sexualy assualted the neviles are supose to be famous people down in orleans from what i heard but her brother famous singer aron was in angola prison he was a gang member like rapper master p and brother why do people try to commit such actslike stealing and sex crimes on women. when we should be helping one another down here it will be awhile before we can recover from this the gambling boats are gone wasahed away even in mississippi but we can make it through thats why they call us cajuns because we can be tough we don't want to leave our state.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 17:15



    robotic123_74 write:
    Maybe the reason I can't find much sympathy in myself for those people is because I was a dirt dog poor poverty stricken kid myself and I lived with the mosquitoes, flies, bed bugs, rats, mice, termites, snakes and all the rest. I was raised in the poorest family I knew of anywhere. We had no bathroom. Not even an outdoor privy, most of the time, we just went out into the woods. We didn't have a water well, we hauled water to drink from a windmill down the road in buckets we carried by hand. I didn't take baths until I went to college and I don't remember bathing a lot there. It wasn't until I got into the Navy that I bathed regularly. I was the first kid of any of my family on either side that I knew of who ever graduated from high school. I was poor until I got out on my own. And I didn't have much for a long time after that. I could write a book on poverty, my kind of poverty. It's dirty, it's smelly and you don't have enough of anything that costs money. I lived that way for years and years. I am not rich now but I am fairly comfortable middle class I guess.

    well mr robotic i can relate to your story my father came from a very poor family and he did what he did on his own with little education he is part of the louisiana cajun mafia a multi millionaire offshore attorney's right hand man so to speak well they are saying to us that it is deadly bacteria that can kill we have to watch out for our selfs what we do down here in the bayous for a long time now they said the polution was up to 200,00 and the normal was 10,000 lsu pepole are down here and all if it gets on your skin or you drink it it will kil you thats why they are telling us to leave but our water is safe here where iam at we just had lots of wind damage but a little more to the west we would not be here if it would have came over the lake not half the lake.
  • View author's info posted on Sep 09, 2005 14:04


    Maybe the reason I can't find much sympathy in myself for those people is because I was a dirt dog poor poverty stricken kid myself and I lived with the mosquitoes, flies, bed bugs, rats, mice, termites, snakes and all the rest. I was raised in the poorest family I knew of anywhere. We had no bathroom. Not even an outdoor privy, most of the time, we just went out into the woods. We didn't have a water well, we hauled water to drink from a windmill down the road in buckets we carried by hand. I didn't take baths until I went to college and I don't remember bathing a lot there. It wasn't until I got into the Navy that I bathed regularly. I was the first kid of any of my family on either side that I knew of who ever graduated from high school. I was poor until I got out on my own. And I didn't have much for a long time after that. I could write a book on poverty, my kind of poverty. It's dirty, it's smelly and you don't have enough of anything that costs money. I lived that way for years and years. I am not rich now but I am fairly comfortable middle class I guess.
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