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ALERT, ALERT---NIGERIANS HAVE INFILTRATED M/M!!!
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Posted on Wed, Aug 24, 2005 14:48

OK...here it is! there are nigerians scamming women & probably some men on M/M.. If anyone has been speaking to a guy who had his profile up as pauljluv1 plz notify me IMMEDIATELY!!!! His profile was deleted by M/M on fraud...I have asked them to send out emails explaining all this to everyone, but they wont do it. So I will take it on myself to do so.They pose as men & women seeking a mate...but the men ask for your address so they can send you flowers...they do this after talking to you for awhile...then they open charge accts. using your name & address.THIS IS SERIOUS BUSINESS..I think it's pretty damn sorry of M/M not to want to alert everyone!



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Posted on Sat, Oct 22, 2005 07:17

Here's most of it...3 out of 500 actually get su*ked in and mail money..Ouch!

I Will Eat Your Dollars'
To the cyber scammers in Nigeria who trawl for victims on the Internet, Americans are easy targets. By Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer

FESTAC, Nigeria ? As patient as fishermen, the young men toil day and night, trawling for replies to the e-mails they shoot to strangers half a world away.

Most recipients hit delete, delete, delete, delete without ever opening the messages that urge them to claim the untold riches of a long-lost deceased second cousin, and the messages that offer millions of dollars to help smuggle loot stolen by a corrupt Nigerian official into a U.S. account.
Asishana Okauru, acting director of financial intelligence for the government's Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, said $700 million relating to 419 crime had been seized in the two years since the establishment of the EFCC. There have been 12 convictions in such cases brought during that time, he said. Okauru said he felt this was a good result given the sluggishness of Nigeria's legal system, but critics say the courts are too slow and corrupt. The real push comes when the fictional girlfriend or fiancee, who claims to be in America, goes to Nigeria for business. In a series of "mishaps," her wallet is stolen and she is held hostage by the hotel owner until she can come up with hundreds of dollars for the bill. She needs a new airline ticket, has to bribe churlish customs officials and gets caught. Finally, she needs a hefty get-out-of-jail bribe.

By 2003, Shepherd was fleecing 25 to 40 victims a month, Samuel said. Samuel never got the 20%, but still made a minimum of $900 a month, three times the average income here. At times, he made $6,000 to $7,000 a month.

Samuel said Shepherd employs seven Nigerians in America, including one in the San Francisco Bay Area, to spy on maghas and threaten any who get cold feet. If a big deal is going off track, he calls in all seven.

"They're all graduates and very smart," Samuel said. "Four of them are graduates in psychology here in Nigeria. If the white guy is getting suspicious, he'll call them all in and say, 'Can you finish this off for me?'

"They'll try to scare you that you're not going to get out of it. Or you're going to be arrested and you will face trial in Nigeria. They'll say: 'We know you were at Wal-Mart yesterday. We know the D.A. He's our friend.' "

"They'll tell you that you are in too deep ? you either complete it or you'll be killed."

Eager to impress his new boss, Samuel worked for six-hour stretches extracting e-mail addresses and sending off letters that had been composed by a college graduate also working for Shepherd.

He sent 500 e-mails a day and usually received about seven replies. Shepherd would then take over.

"When you get a reply, it's 70% sure that you'll get the money," Samuel said.


Though the fraud is apparent to many, some people think they have stumbled on a once-in-a-lifetime deal, and scammers can string them along for months with mythical difficulties. Some victims eventually contribute huge sums of money to save the deal when it is suddenly "at risk."

Stephen Kovacsics of American Citizen Services, an office of the U.S. Consulate, spoke to a victim who had lost $200,000.

Kovacsics says he is awakened several nights a week by Americans pleading for help with an emergency, such as a fiancee (whom they have only met in an online chat room) locked up in a Nigerian jail. He has to tell them that there is probably no fiancee, no emergency.

Kovacsics said victims can't believe that a scammer would spend months of internet chat just to net $700 or $1,000, not realizing that is big money in Nigeria and fraudsters will have many scams running at the same time.


The many forms of 419 scams:

Advance-fee frauds, also known as 419, appear to offer a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get rich or find the girl of your dreams. The scams can involve phony websites, forged documents and Nigerians in America posing as government officials. Here are some of the most popular:

? The "next of kin" scam, tempting you to claim an inheritance of millions of dollars in a Nigerian bank belonging to a long-lost relative, then collecting money for various bank and transfer fees.

? The "laundering crooked money" scam, in which you are promised a large commission on a multibillion-dollar fortune, persuaded to open an account, contribute funds and sometimes even travel to Nigeria.

? The "Nigerian National Petroleum Co." scam, in which the scammer offers cheap crude oil, then demands money for commissions and bribes.

? The "overpayment" scam, in which fraudsters send a bank check overpaying for a car or other goods by many thousands of dollars, persuading the victim to transfer the difference back to Nigeria.

? The "job offer you can't refuse" scam, in which an "oil company" offers a job with an overly attractive salary and conditions (in one example, $180,000 a year and $300 per hour for overtime) and extracts money for visas, permits and other fees.

? The "winning ticket in a lottery you never entered" scam ? including, lately, the State Department's green card lottery.

? The "gorgeous person in trouble" scam, in which scammers in chat rooms and on Christian dating sites pose as beautiful American or Nigerian women, luring lonely men into Internet intimacy over weeks or months then asking them to send money to get them out of trouble.
Here's most of it...3 out of 500 actually get su*ked in and mail money..Ouch!

I Will Eat Your Dollars'
To the cyber scammers in Nigeria who trawl for victims on the Internet, Americans are easy targets. By Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer

FESTAC, Nigeria ? As patient as fishermen, the young men toil day and night, trawling for replies to the e-mails they shoot to strangers half a world away.

Most recipients hit delete, delete, delete, delete without ever opening the messages that urge them to claim the untold riches of a long-lost deceased second cousin, and the messages that offer millions of dollars to help smuggle loot stolen by a corrupt Nigerian official into a U.S. account.
Asishana Okauru, acting director of financial intelligence for the government's Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, said $700 million relating to 419 crime had been seized in the two years since the establishment of the EFCC. There have been 12 convictions in such cases brought during that time, he said. Okauru said he felt this was a good result given the sluggishness of Nigeria's legal system, but critics say the courts are too slow and corrupt. The real push comes when the fictional girlfriend or fiancee, who claims to be in America, goes to Nigeria for business. In a series of "mishaps," her wallet is stolen and she is held hostage by the hotel owner until she can come up with hundreds of dollars for the bill. She needs a new airline ticket, has to bribe churlish customs officials and gets caught. Finally, she needs a hefty get-out-of-jail bribe.

By 2003, Shepherd was fleecing 25 to 40 victims a month, Samuel said. Samuel never got the 20%, but still made a minimum of $900 a month, three times the average income here. At times, he made $6,000 to $7,000 a month.

Samuel said Shepherd employs seven Nigerians in America, including one in the San Francisco Bay Area, to spy on maghas and threaten any who get cold feet. If a big deal is going off track, he calls in all seven.

"They're all graduates and very smart," Samuel said. "Four of them are graduates in psychology here in Nigeria. If the white guy is getting suspicious, he'll call them all in and say, 'Can you finish this off for me?'

"They'll try to scare you that you're not going to get out of it. Or you're going to be arrested and you will face trial in Nigeria. They'll say: 'We know you were at Wal-Mart yesterday. We know the D.A. He's our friend.' "

"They'll tell you that you are in too deep ? you either complete it or you'll be killed."

Eager to impress his new boss, Samuel worked for six-hour stretches extracting e-mail addresses and sending off letters that had been composed by a college graduate also working for Shepherd.

He sent 500 e-mails a day and usually received about seven replies. Shepherd would then take over.

"When you get a reply, it's 70% sure that you'll get the money," Samuel said.


Though the fraud is apparent to many, some people think they have stumbled on a once-in-a-lifetime deal, and scammers can string them along for months with mythical difficulties. Some victims eventually contribute huge sums of money to save the deal when it is suddenly "at risk."

Stephen Kovacsics of American Citizen Services, an office of the U.S. Consulate, spoke to a victim who had lost $200,000.

Kovacsics says he is awakened several nights a week by Americans pleading for help with an emergency, such as a fiancee (whom they have only met in an online chat room) locked up in a Nigerian jail. He has to tell them that there is probably no fiancee, no emergency.

Kovacsics said victims can't believe that a scammer would spend months of internet chat just to net $700 or $1,000, not realizing that is big money in Nigeria and fraudsters will have many scams running at the same time.


The many forms of 419 scams:

Advance-fee frauds, also known as 419, appear to offer a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get rich or find the girl of your dreams. The scams can involve phony websites, forged documents and Nigerians in America posing as government officials. Here are some of the most popular:

? The "next of kin" scam, tempting you to claim an inheritance of millions of dollars in a Nigerian bank belonging to a long-lost relative, then collecting money for various bank and transfer fees.

? The "laundering crooked money" scam, in which you are promised a large commission on a multibillion-dollar fortune, persuaded to open an account, contribute funds and sometimes even travel to Nigeria.

? The "Nigerian National Petroleum Co." scam, in which the scammer offers cheap crude oil, then demands money for commissions and bribes.

? The "overpayment" scam, in which fraudsters send a bank check overpaying for a car or other goods by many thousands of dollars, persuading the victim to transfer the difference back to Nigeria.

? The "job offer you can't refuse" scam, in which an "oil company" offers a job with an overly attractive salary and conditions (in one example, $180,000 a year and $300 per hour for overtime) and extracts money for visas, permits and other fees.

? The "winning ticket in a lottery you never entered" scam ? including, lately, the State Department's green card lottery.

? The "gorgeous person in trouble" scam, in which scammers in chat rooms and on Christian dating sites pose as beautiful American or Nigerian women, luring lonely men into Internet intimacy over weeks or months then asking them to send money to get them out of trouble.



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Posted on Sat, Oct 22, 2005 05:12

There was an excellent article in the Los Angeles Times Thursday of these boiler rooms in Nigeria where they write these e-mails and try and dupe people. Their success rate is 3 out of 500 people acyually send money to them, some after being threatened and followed by Nigerian cohorts of theirs in the US. I will seeif I can get a link. Interesting reading.
There was an excellent article in the Los Angeles Times Thursday of these boiler rooms in Nigeria where they write these e-mails and try and dupe people. Their success rate is 3 out of 500 people acyually send money to them, some after being threatened and followed by Nigerian cohorts of theirs in the US. I will seeif I can get a link. Interesting reading.



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Posted on Sat, Oct 08, 2005 07:29


statuesque4u write:

ciaobaby7 write:
I was in a chat room not to long ago and a guy came in from Russia. Naturally he was being obnoxious and threatening to "hack" people. He then started to post names, addresses and credit card numbers in the chat room. I was shocked! I'm not quite sure how he obtained such information, but my guess would be that he knows how to gain this information through personal computers.



I had a situation happen the other day where someone from Connecticut got a hold of one of my CC info and charged on it several hundred. One of the people he was buying from alerted me as the addy didn't match the number. I then took the neccessary precaution and F/U to change it and alert the companies. First time that has happened to me and there is a lot of work in taking care of this problem after it has occurred.. I think i will go the phone route from now on. Barring someone tapping the phones it would be the safest.....

That probably is the best route to take even if we are protected by the companies for fraud. It's the hasdle of of resolving the issues that becomes a headache.



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Posted on Fri, Oct 07, 2005 09:53


ciaobaby7 write:
I was in a chat room not to long ago and a guy came in from Russia. Naturally he was being obnoxious and threatening to "hack" people. He then started to post names, addresses and credit card numbers in the chat room. I was shocked! I'm not quite sure how he obtained such information, but my guess would be that he knows how to gain this information through personal computers.



I had a situation happen the other day where someone from Connecticut got a hold of one of my CC info and charged on it several hundred. One of the people he was buying from alerted me as the addy didn't match the number. I then took the neccessary precaution and F/U to change it and alert the companies. First time that has happened to me and there is a lot of work in taking care of this problem after it has occurred.. I think i will go the phone route from now on. Barring someone tapping the phones it would be the safest.....



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Posted on Thu, Oct 06, 2005 18:01

I was in a chat room not to long ago and a guy came in from Russia. Naturally he was being obnoxious and threatening to "hack" people. He then started to post names, addresses and credit card numbers in the chat room. I was shocked! I'm not quite sure how he obtained such information, but my guess would be that he knows how to gain this information through personal computers.

  


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Posted on Thu, Oct 06, 2005 16:23


Robec8 write:
I get those letter constantly, but mine are about them being some sort of royalty and wanting to deposit money in my checking account. (LOL). I always write back and tell them to Western Union the money to me. They can trust me to give it back to them.



Just found this thread!

LMAO robec THATS one way round it!!

  


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Posted on Wed, Oct 05, 2005 17:36

I have had so many of those stupid royalty emails sent to me, it is almost funny. I also had a supposed credit card company tell me that someone had tried to use my card. Asked my number, etc....then tried to get $400 out of my bank acct. I don't use my credit online anymore either!!!



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Posted on Fri, Aug 26, 2005 12:41

Top Five Online Scams

You might think Web surfers have started to wise up to Internet rip-offs. But you'd be wrong. Here's how scammers are trying to dupe you today.

Dan Tynan
Tuesday, March 08, 2005

After years of trying to recover from the do*t-com hangover, the Internet is booming again. Online retail sales increased by 26 percent in 2004, according to comScore Networks. In September 2004, the number of domain name registrations hit 64.5 million--an all-time high. You know what else is on the rise? Internet crime.


Complaints about online fraud nearly doubled from 2003 to 2004, according to a December 2004 report by the FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center. Research firm Gartner estimates that nearly 10 million Americans were hit by online fraudsters last year--largely due to a wave of phishing e-mails seeking to steal users' identities.

In fact, phishing attacks seem to be the new, hot scam. Scammers send you an e-mail that tries to lure you to a legitimate-looking Web site where you'll be asked to enter personal information. The thing is, it's all fake; and if you fall for it, someone is ready to take your Social Security Number and start opening credit card accounts.

The FBI recently began warning people of scammers posing as tsunami-relief organizations. And late last month, the FBI warned that someone out there was even posing as the FBI itself--sending a fraudulent e-mail with the subject line "FBI Investigation" and trying to lure people into buying products from a separate, fictional scam artist whom the Feds were supposedly on to.

Confusing? Sure. But just ask yourself this: When was the last time the FBI sent a polite e-mail when they wanted someone's cooperation in an investigation?

Thousands of con artists, grifters, fraudsters, and other denizens of the dark are trolling for victims online. Can you recognize online fraud when you see it? Here's a quick guide to the Top 5 scams and schemes you're most likely to find on the 'Net.

1. Auction Fraud

The setup: Online auction fraud accounts for three-quarters of all complaints registered with the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center (formerly the Internet Fraud Complaint Center). There are many types of eBay chicanery, but the most common one is where you send in your money and get nothing but grief in return.

What actually happens: You never get the product promised, or the promises don't match the product. The descriptions may be vague, incomplete, or completely fake. One scammer accepted bids for Louis Vuitton bags that she didn't own, and then scoured the Internet looking for cheap knockoffs that cost less than the winning bid. She managed to collect at least $18,000 from bidders before she got nailed. A buyer thought he'd purchased a portable DVD player for $100, but what he got instead was a Web address for a site where he could buy a player for a $200 discount. The stories are virtually endless.

The risk: You get ripped off, losing time and money. If you spill the beans about the scam, the seller may retaliate by posting negative eBay reports about you using phony names.

The question you've gotta ask yourself: Who in their right mind would sell a $200 bag for $20?

2. Phishing Scams

The setup: You receive an e-mail that looks like it came from your bank, warning you about identity theft and asking that you log in and verify your account information. The message says that if you don't take action immediately, your account will be terminated.

What actually happens: Even though the e-mail looks like the real deal, complete with authentic logos and working Web links, it's a clever fake. The Web site where you're told to enter your account information is also bogus. In some instances, really smart phishers direct you to the genuine Web site, then pop up a window over the site that captures your personal information.

The risk: Your account information will be sold to criminals, who'll use it to ruin your credit and drain your account. According to Gartner, phishing scammers took consumers (and their banks, who had to cover the charges) for $1.2 billion in 2003.

The question you've gotta ask yourself: If this matter is so urgent, why isn't my bank calling me instead of sending e-mail?

3. Nigerian 419 Letter

The setup: You receive an e-mail, usually written in screaming capital letters, that starts out like this:

"DEAR SIR/MADAM: I REPRESENT THE RECENTLY DEPOSED MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE FOR NODAMBIZIA, WHO HAS EMBEZZLED 30 MILLION DOLLARS FROM HIS STARVING COUNTRYMEN AND NOW NEEDS TO GET IT OUT OF THE COUNTRY..."

The letter says the scammers are seeking an accomplice who will transfer the funds into their account for a cut of the total--usually around 30 percent. You'll be asked to travel overseas to meet with the scammers and complete the necessary paperwork. But before the transaction can be finalized, you must pay thousands of dollars in "taxes," "attorney costs," "bribes," or other advance fees.

What actually happens: There's no minister and no money--except for the money you put up in advance. Victims who travel overseas may find themselves physically threatened and not allowed to leave until they cough up the cash. (FYI, "419" is named for the section of Nigeria's penal code that the scam violates.)

The risk: Serious financial loss--or worse. Victims of Nigerian letter fraud lose $3000 on average, according to the FBI. Several victims have been killed or gone missing while chasing a 419 scheme.

The question you've gotta ask yourself: Of all the people in the world, why would a corrupt African bureaucrat pick me to be his accomplice?

4. Postal Forwarding/Reshipping Scam

The setup: You answer an online ad looking for a "correspondence manager." An offshore corporation that lacks a U.S. address or bank account needs someone to take goods sent to their address and reship them overseas. You may also be asked to accept wire transfers into your bank account, then transfer the money to your new boss's account. In each case, you collect a percentage of the goods or amount transferred.

What actually happens: Products are purchased online using stolen credit cards--often with identities that have been purloined by phishers--and shipped to your address. You then reship them to the thieves, who will fence them overseas. Or you're transferring stolen funds from one account to another to obscure the money trail.

The risk: Sure, you can make big bucks for a while. But after a few months, you're going to look inside your bank account and find it cleaned out. Worse, when the feds come looking for the scammers, you're the one they're going to nail.

The question you've gotta ask yourself: Why can't these people receive their own darn mail?

5. "Congratulations, You've Won an Xbox (IPod, plasma TV, etc.)"

The setup: You get an e-mail telling you that you've won something cool--usually the hot gadget du jour, such as an Xbox or an IPod. All you need to do is visit a Web site and provide your debit card number and PIN to cover "shipping and handling" costs.

What actually happens: The item never arrives. A few months later, mystery charges start showing up on your bank account. The only thing that gets shipped and handled is your identity. (A more benign variation on this scam drives you to a site where you're asked to cough up your contact info and agree to receive spam from advertisers until unwanted e-mail is coming out of your ears.)

The risk: Identity theft, as well as lost money if you don't dispute the charges.

The question you've gotta ask yourself: When did I enter a contest to win an Xbox (iPod, plasma TV, etc.)?
Award-winning journalist Dan Tynan has written about Internet scams and scammers for more than a decade. He's the author of PC World's Gadget Freak column and the upcoming book, Privacy Annoyances (O'Reilly Media, 2005). He has never come to the rescue of a deposed African bureaucrat.



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Posted on Fri, Aug 26, 2005 07:04

I get those letter constantly, but mine are about them being some sort of royalty and wanting to deposit money in my checking account. (LOL). I always write back and tell them to Western Union the money to me. They can trust me to give it back to them.



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Posted on Fri, Aug 26, 2005 02:52


BK2005 write:
nigerians are notorious for con games. I suggest that you not even start a conversation with them. No predjudice intended, just personal knowledge of the manycon games someof they are infamous for

they are cunning & u dont even know they are nigerians. they come off as american men & as american women with all kinds of pics to prove they are americans........lol so u dont know. isnt easy to find out who they are until they have scammed many. M/M needs to step up their security before they get hit with breach of security lawsuits like crazy!



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Posted on Fri, Aug 26, 2005 02:44

Naturedoctor...If u read back to see what I opened this thread with.u will see it is same man as I had experience with but different name..& yes after we had talked awhile, he got my addy to send roses...2 doz, to be exact.M/M closed his acct out for fraud. He informed me that he was having stuff sent to my house & wanted forwarded on to him. didnt ask..it was already on it's way here. stuff started showing up from the Gap & other places, but when I checked the invoice it showed I had paid for it. I called the Gap to find it had been paid for by a visa in my name. Hell..I didnt have a visa, and my bank acct & debit was closed due to stuff happening & had charges on it I couldnt explain right before this. I called M/M & asked bout this guy to find out his profile was closed due to fraud, I asked M/M to warn other women, said they couldnt...so I have.that man is nigerian..we spoke on phone a few times but bout the time I started to get his accent, we we're disconnected. Now he is raising he*ll with me cuz I WONT forward this stuff, as matter of fact..the Secret Service is now involved!!! Secret Service told me to close my acct on M/M that these sites arent secure.there has been names & passwords stolen on here awhile back. there is a site in search that tells about the name & passwords stolen on M/M . I bet the pics u have of this guy are the same as what I have. I hear a few men are getting this with supposed women too.Best thing to do is do not have any credit card info on sites, they juggle the last 4 numbers not exposed to get a card number. these people are very slick, it is a new nigerian scam.....

  


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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 23:48

I had a man on here under the name gerald_lofton who posted an entirely normal picture -- age-appropriate. (MM has taken him entirely off, but he might be back on under a different name). My FIRST clue was that he sent flowers from "Europe"--only thing was that two bouquets arrived with two different names on the tags with almost the exact same "love note". When confronted he said it was "their mistake??????". Then he told me he was at the Carlton in England and that he was in a cottage for "people who don't like hotels". I called the hotel and they said they had no such cottages. Then he started to DEMAND that I buy his daughter something she needed..makeup and even had his "daughter" write to me--probably him under a different e-mail address. When I checked it out he wanted me to actually send him almost $4,000 worth of cosmetics that his "daughter" did not have the authority to sell in Africa. HUM...Has this happened to anyone else. I would love to find out if others started to fall into this trap!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Nothing on my credit that I know of but first thing tomorrow I will notify ALL of the credit card agencies and put a fraud alert on my accounts....What else can a trusting woman do. What topped if off was that he gave me an address which when I checked it out did not even exist. He told me that he lived in Dublin, Ohio and the Public Records said that NO ONE WITH THAT NAME lived there or owned property there.....Anyone else dealing with this man gerald_lofton??????? Don't worry as he is NOT on here.



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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 19:48

not long ago, my daughter listed her jeep parts on yaho* auction. a guy in england (so he said) bought them and wanted to send her a USPO money order for more than the cost of the parts and have her wire the remainder to Nigeria. Talk about red flags! There was an earlier thread about this scam, too. anyway, she played along and when she got the money order, she took it to the Post office and turned it in and sure enough it was a fake (the water mark was just a pic printed lightly on the back, and there was no security strip like they have on our new currency. she had already contacted the FBI about it and filed a report, for which she got a canned response of "we can't investigate every complaint, thank you". anyway the post office is gathering info on them to investigate. she sent him an email and told him, sorry the deal is off, NO PARTS FOR YOU! your Money Order is a fraud. apparently the money has something to with a civil war or to launder money for some highly placed individual so he can get his $$$ out of the country (Nigeria). i don't know for sure, but it is a little scarey.

  


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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 16:18

Ebay and Pay pal say they will never send you a email asking for personal info.



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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 12:26


knock3times write:

realdealru2 write:
K3T I just got thru talking with the U.S. Secret Service..she said these sites are NOT secure & had advised me to close my acct down. that these scams are done with bits & pieces of info taken off sites & what we tell them. Well I no longer have my bank acct. or any of that anymore because someone got to my info So from now on it's with cash only! I wont be a paying member of this site again...that's for sure~



My Ebay account was compromised a couple of months ago. Someone sent a counterfeit email with Ebay's logo requesting my bank acct. info, pin number etc. Red flags went off in my head. Now why would Ebay need my pin number? I contact them and it was confirmed a scam was perpetrated. Nice try crooks.

Better safe than sorry.


It's called "phishing" and is apparently pretty lucrative. You can apot these fakes by running your mouse pointer over anything that appears to be a link. In many cases the pointer will not turn to a hand. Fake. If it doews turn into a hand, the web address you will go to by clicking will appear either right next to your pointer or at the bottom of the window. It may say ebay or paypal, but that's still no reason to trust it. If in any doubt, forward the entire message to the address "spoof" at either ebay or paypal, as appropriate. 99 times out of 100 you'll get an email back saying they did not in fact send it. This may happen for sites other than these two, but those are the only ones I get. Oh, and if you're on a-o-l, beware of messages saying you've got pictures. Those are always fake: if someone has sent you pictures, there will be a clickable link on your sign-on screen.

I've heard of theives cutting the bottoms out of mailboxes to steal checks that will now not pay your bills, of stealing credit cards when they are in your mailbox (your card, your name in their handwriting, can it get any easier?)

There's a wonderful Arab proverb that holds: Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel. Be careful out there!

Bill / wilfred06



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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 12:20

nigerians are notorious for con games. I suggest that you not even start a conversation with them. No predjudice intended, just personal knowledge of the manycon games someof they are infamous for



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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 08:08


realdealru2 write:
K3T I just got thru talking with the U.S. Secret Service..she said these sites are NOT secure & had advised me to close my acct down. that these scams are done with bits & pieces of info taken off sites & what we tell them. Well I no longer have my bank acct. or any of that anymore because someone got to my info So from now on it's with cash only! I wont be a paying member of this site again...that's for sure~



My Ebay account was compromised a couple of months ago. Someone sent a counterfeit email with Ebay's logo requesting my bank acct. info, pin number etc. Red flags went off in my head. Now why would Ebay need my pin number? I contact them and it was confirmed a scam was perpetrated. Nice try crooks.

Better safe than sorry.



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Posted on Thu, Aug 25, 2005 06:24

K3T I just got thru talking with the U.S. Secret Service..she said these sites are NOT secure & had advised me to close my acct down. that these scams are done with bits & pieces of info taken off sites & what we tell them. Well I no longer have my bank acct. or any of that anymore because someone got to my info So from now on it's with cash only! I wont be a paying member of this site again...that's for sure~

  


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Posted on Wed, Aug 24, 2005 18:55


knock3times write:

realdealru2 write:
[

Jolene I doubt they can open charge accts. using anyone's name unless they have the correct S.S.I. number and other pertinent information such as employer's name, income etc.

If someone is foolish enough to give a stranger their S.S.I. -- well you know what P.T. Barnum said -- "there's a s*ucker born every minute".

quote_message]k3t.........they can & have.......MINE! i now have a visa out there with my name & things charged to it by the guy who had a profile on here. there is a way to steal ur name & password & has been done on M/M many times in the past. there is also a site to go to to steal passwords & names for millionairematch ..i had moonpie look it up. dont u remember when names were being used on M/M cuz someone stole another's password & created so much havoc? it may of been before ur time..ask moon, bet she remembers it too." Nigerians can get around the ssi info...check the nigerian scams on the net.



I do recall the incident when identities where stolen especially Angie's and insults were directed to Lorrie, in addition, there was a problem with someone using IM in which 1hotmamma(or Nightmyst or perhaps Dawn's)username was used to randomly send sexually suggestive i.e. obscene messages primarily for the shock value. No the security issues of this site are nothing new to me.

Admittedly I'm not aware of scams generated on the net by Nigerians or any ethnic group that has the capability to steal identity with or without knowledge of a S.S.I. number. I guess you learn something new everyday.

most of us use credit cards or debit cards to sign on to sites..with these people knowing how to get & use names, passwords they can get into ur billing info..like on credit card info it dont show last 4 digets...they play with numbers to get them to working.is one reason they say never put info on the net that has any kind of personal info, cuz these people are really slick & pulling all sort of scams.this guy had told me he talked to many women on this site & I wanted to alert them. not long ago was a girl that had this same problem...the guy cleaned her out, said she didnt give out banking info or ssi numbers but he still got to her...betting is same guy. i didnt give out my banking or ssi number but had gave out addy cuz he wanted to send those roses..Damn........now I am wondering who paid for em.......lol



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