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Colloquial terms, quirky idioms and origin of words.
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Posted on Wed, Apr 27, 2005 14:27

The originators of this thread are Bonnie88 and Minerva415.

"Hi,
What do you think if we start a collection of colloquial terms for all sorts of saucy words, naughty words, quirky idioms and even swearing in other languages, their origins..
this was started in another topic site..so this seems a good place to move to.. Bonnie 88"

ps - Let us transfer our Sardonicia hormones onto this thread over here, shall we?? - MR

  


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Posted on Tue, Dec 01, 2009 17:19

Hilarious! I always thought it was funny how we've come to use the word "NICE", as if it's a good thing. It comes from a Latin word that means "ignorant".



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Posted on Mon, Sep 25, 2006 20:41

I'm not positive on all of these, but this is what I've been told:

"Rule of Thumb" is from an old English law allowing a man to beat his wife with a swatch no thicker than his thumb.

"The whole 9 yards" refers to the fact machine gun ammunition came in 27 foot strips of bullets and if you were told to give them the whole nine yards it meant to exhaust your ammunition on the enemy.

"A stitch in time saves nine" referred to Roosevelt's attempt to amend the constitution and create 12 justice seats on the Supreme Court instead of 9 in order to overturn some controversial rulings but the court began to issue more administration friendly opinions and he abandoned his efforts.



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Posted on Wed, Oct 19, 2005 19:40

i am from australia, so we have a few...

eggnishna = air conditioner
i.e. turn the eggnishning up

dag = literally a piece of dung hanging from the rear end of a sheep. colloquially it means a person who is funny, cute, and weird

thongs = footwear,not underwear. probably what everywhere else knows as flip flops.

mate = reference to friends, as well as strangers met on the street. i.e. excuse me mate, you got the time?

footpath = sidewalk

aggro = angry

AFL = australian football league

that is just a short list, but there are many more. i will add some more as i think of them.
i am from australia, so we have a few...

eggnishna = air conditioner
i.e. turn the eggnishning up

dag = literally a piece of dung hanging from the rear end of a sheep. colloquially it means a person who is funny, cute, and weird

thongs = footwear,not underwear. probably what everywhere else knows as flip flops.

mate = reference to friends, as well as strangers met on the street. i.e. excuse me mate, you got the time?

footpath = sidewalk

aggro = angry

AFL = australian football league

that is just a short list, but there are many more. i will add some more as i think of them.



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Posted on Thu, Jun 30, 2005 17:04

13. We eat supper (dinner? we ate it at noon) together with our families. We pray before we eat--yeah, even breakfast. We go to church on Sundays, and we go to high school football games on Friday nights. We still address our seniors with "yes, sir" and "yes, ma'am," and we sometimes still take Sunday drives around town to see friends and neighbors.
14.. We don't do "hurry up" real well.
15. Greens -- yeah, we have greens, but you don't putt on them. You boil them with fatback or bacon and sometimes eat them with a smoked hog jowl.

16. Yeah, we eat catfish, bass, bream, and carp. You really want sushi and caviar? It's available down at the bait shop.

17. They are pigs. That's what they smell like. Get over it. Don't like it? Interstate 95 goes two ways. Interstate 40 goes the other two. Pick one.

18. Grits are corn. You put butter, salt, and maybe even some pepper on them. If you want to put milk and sugar on them, then you want Cream of Wheat -- go to Kansas . That would be I-70 West.

19. The "Opener" refers to the first day of deer season or dove season. Both are holidays. You can get pancakes, cane syrup, and sausage before daylight at the church on either day.

20. So every person in every pickup truck waves? Yeah, it's called being friendly. You understand the concept?

21. Yeah, we have golf courses. Don't hit in the water hazards. It spooks the fish and bothers the 'gators -- and, if you hit it in the rough, we have these things called diamondbacks, and they're not baseball players.

22. That Highway Patrol Officer that just pulled you over for driving like an idiot -His name is "Sir," no matter how young he is.

23. We have lots of pine trees. They have sap. It drips from them. You park your darn Navigator under them, and they'll leave a souvenir on your hood.
24. You burn an American Flag in our state, you get beat up. No questions. The liberal contingent of our state legislature en...



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Posted on Thu, Jun 30, 2005 17:03

In an effort to help outsiders understand the rules of the Southerner's mind, the following list should be handed to each person as they enter a Southern State. i.e., Texas, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Arkansas, Florida, etc.

1. That farm boy you see at the gas station did more work before breakfast than you do all week at the gym.

2. It's called a "gravel road." No matter how slow you drive, you're going to get dust on your Lincoln Navigator. Drive it or get it out of the way!

3. The red dirt -- it's called clay. Red clay. If you like the color, don't wash your car for a couple weeks -- it'll be permanent.

4. We all started hunting and fishing when we were seven years old. Yeah, we saw that Bambi movie, too. We got over it.

5. Go ahead and bring your $600 Orvis fly rod. Don't cry to us if a flathead breaks it off at the handle . We have a name for those little 13-inch Trout you fish for: BAIT !

6. Pull your pants up! You look like an idiot.

7. If that cell phone rings while a bunch of mallards are making their final approach, we will shoot it. You might want to ensure it's not up to your ear at the time.

8. No, there's no "Vegetarian Special" on the menu. Order steak. Order it rare or you can order the Chef's Salad and pick off the two pounds of ham and turkey.

9. Tea -- yeah, we have tea. It comes in a glass over ice and it's sweet. You want it hot? Set it in the sun. You want it unsweetened? Add a lot of water.

10. You bring Coke into our house! It better be brown, bubbly, and served over ice!

11. You have a sixty-thousand-dollar car. We're real impressed. We have a quarter of a million-dollar Combine that we only use two weeks a year.

12. Let's get this straight. We have one stop light in town. We stop when it's red. We may even stop when it's yellow.



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Posted on Tue, May 10, 2005 18:13

Only a Southerner knows the difference between a hissie fit and a conniption fit, and that you don't "HAVE" them, you "PITCH" them.

Only a Southerner knows how many fish, collard greens, turnip greens, peas, beans, etc., make up "a mess."

Only a Southerner can show or point out to you the general direction of yonder."

<>Only a Southerner knows exactly how long "directly " is as in: "Going to town, be back directly."

Even Southern babies know that "Gimme some sugar" is not a request for the white, granular sweet substance that sits in a pretty little bowl in the middle of the table.

<>All Southerners know exactly when "by and by" is. They might not use the term, but they know the concept well.
<>

<>Only a Southerner knows instinctively that the best gesture of solace for a neighbor who's got trouble is a plate of hot fried chicken and a big bowl of cold potato salad. If the neighbor's trouble is a real crisis, they also know to add a large banana puddin!

<>Only Southerners grow up knowing the difference between "right near" and "a right far piece." They also know that "just down the road" can be 1 mile or 20.

<>Only a Southerner, both knows and understands, the difference between a redneck, a good ol' boy, and po' white trash.

No true Southerner would ever assume that the car with the flashing turn signal is actually going to make a turn.

<>A Southerner knows that "fixin" can be used as a noun, a verb, or an adverb.
<>
<>Only Southerners make friends while standing in lines. We don't do "queues," we do "lines"; and when
<>we're "in line," we talk to everybody!
<>
<>Put 100 Southerners in a room and half of them will discover they're related, even if only by marriage.



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Posted on Tue, May 10, 2005 18:12

<>Southerners never refer to one person as "ya'll."

<>Southerners know grits come from corn and how to eat them.
<>
Every Southerner knows tomatoes with eggs, bacon, grits, and coffee are perfectly wonderful; that red eye gravy is also a breakfast food; and that fried green tomatoes are not a breakfast food.
<>
<>When you hear someone say, "Well, I caught myself lookin'," you know you are in the presence of a genuine Southerner!
<>
<>Only true Southerners say "sweet tea" and "sweet milk." Sweet tea indicates the need for sugar and lots of it -- we do not like our tea unsweetened. "Sweet milk" means you don't want buttermilk.
<>
<>And a true Southerner knows you don't scream obscenities at little old ladies who drive 30 MPH on the freeway. You just say, "Bless her heart" and go your own way.

<>To those of you who're still a little embarrassed by your Southerness, take two tent revivals and a dose of sausage gravy and call me in the morning.<><>

And to those of you who are still having a hard time understanding all this Southern stuff, bless your hearts, I hear they are fixin' to have classes on Southerness as a second language! Bless your heart!

And for those that are not from the South but have lived here for a long time, ya'll need a sign to hang on ya'lls front porch that reads "I aint from the South but I got here as fast as I could!!!"



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Posted on Wed, May 04, 2005 18:09

Kim, I loved reading about the origins of the olde english phrases. I have a few phrase origins that might enlighten the audience.

Jarhead - This is the term for a US Marine. The phrase came from the early days of the US Navy and those serving on the USS Constitution. The Marines of the day were typically much taller then the sailors below decks. The below deck sailors were conscripted for their small stature because of the cramped working space and low beams. If one of the gunners killed in battle one of the marines would take his place. Being tall in stature they would normally hit or jar their heads on the low beams hence the name.

Keep a stiff upper lip - This phrase too began in the US Navy. Many on the first US sailors were actually civilian sailors that were rounded up at port and forced to serve in the US Navy. Soon the US Navy learned that when they would enter a new port they would lose as many sailors as they could round up so they started mooring the ships a mile or so from the port. Some very brave sailors that wanted out though would fake thier own death. The dead sailor would be placed in his hammock and sewn in with all of his possesions. The very last stitch would go through the bottom of the jaw and out through his upper lip. This was to ensure that the sailor was actually dead. So, if the "faking" sailor could "keep a stiff upper lip" then he could use his knife to cut himself free once the hammock was tossed overboard, then he could swim to shore and his freedom.



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Posted on Wed, May 04, 2005 14:36

Six,
Love your elaborate rendition of Old English idioms..never realised the origins of all those strange sayings...

I now the only odd one was 'spend a penny' which my Mother-in-law uses-which meant going to the loo (toilet) because in the war years, one had to pay a penny to go and use a public toilet..



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Posted on Sat, Apr 30, 2005 05:09

Moonray... yeah that translation for goldfish is funny -- makes a lot of sense doesn't it?! lol
Did you know the popular expression gee whiz comes from geewhillikins?
How about the ever-popular French word: "andouille". Literally it means a sausage made of chitterlings (pig's intestines) but it also means twit or prat! And of course "couillon" which means dangly bit and also twit or prat.

  


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Posted on Sat, Apr 30, 2005 04:55

Bonnie... that HITSHITSHIT one was hilarious!!
and the $1 per head... lol...
There are some pretty choice swear words in Greek referring to a certain part of a woman's anatomy AND a man's. In French too but the Greek ones are worse. I think the further south one goes the more graphic they get! In fact now that I think about it, hell our swear words cover it all!!
But of course being the good girl I am, I NEVER swear....

  


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Posted on Fri, Apr 29, 2005 22:37

I recently saw two signs in the loo of the Tower of London -
"Loo of the Year Award 2005" and

"No eating or drinking in the toilets". There must be a reason they had to post it - probably crazy tourists.



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Posted on Fri, Apr 29, 2005 17:06

I learned a new phrase today.

Rock Pound - It appears to be a New England term that stands for a corral of sorts normally in the center of small towns that was used in the early days to house stray cows, horses or other livestock that was roaming the city. The corral was constructed out of rocks form the normally rocky ground in the area.



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Posted on Fri, Apr 29, 2005 11:28

FUNNY SIGNS WITNESSED IN MY TRAVEL:
INdonesia- 'Terminal Bus' for bus depot or garage for buses..anyone dare take that bus?

Sign for a record or now dvd music shop- 'HITSHITSHIT', the sign maker was trying to save on space..when they meant 'Hits, hits, hits..'

Sign in a stall that sells stew lamb brains:- '$1 per head' - you reckon is it per head of the lamb or per person who eats it??

Sign in Vancouver at a dept. store:

'Umbrella for sale..they don't last long.'
- do you think they are that honest about the quality of the umbrellas or that the sale is not going to last long?

  


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Posted on Fri, Apr 29, 2005 00:38


Cub39 write:
Oh my Bonnie, now you are truly straying from your norm!
______________________________________
CUB
please re read my definition on the 4 letter word again..I was not out of my norm..just to show how a decent acronym for an act of love been abused down the line..whoever started the acronym must be turning in his grave..to think that it has been so adulterated into a swear word world-wide...
I have never been able to fathom why 90% of the world's swear words in any language is related one way or other to the sexual act and the female genitalia often linked to one's mother..should the female anatomy which is the birthplace of all life be so abused?

  


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Posted on Thu, Apr 28, 2005 21:47

This is great, guys, I've been telling my daughters about the new words. I'll be gone for 4 days but I'll add something for sure next week! Have a great week-end, everyone!

Since I have to stick to the topic, did you know that "goldfish" translates into "poisson rouge" in French, which means "red fish"... now how did THAT come about???

  


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Posted on Thu, Apr 28, 2005 10:58

..so this seems a good place to move to.. Bonnie 88"

ps - Let us transfer our Sardonicia hormones onto this thread over here, shall we?? - MR


well done MOon..this glossary should be fun and here are some more of mine:

Kiasu- A Singlish term from Singapore which means a real loser

Bagaro- Japanese for a bloody fool

Loo- for toilet in UK similarly SPEND A PENNY - for going to the loo..

BUILDER'S CLEAVAGE-when workmen wear their pants slung low and they bend over to work , you see their bum cheeks..

FRisky- term for someone who is feeling really ho*ny



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Posted on Thu, Apr 28, 2005 06:51

wow..this is a hot site..COOL =brill
wonder if u guys know what the famous 4-letter word F*** word actually stand for..
For the uninitiated:
F--Fornication
U-under
C-Ca*nal
K-KNowledge
so in fact it was never a derogatory term..and how we have abused it!



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Posted on Thu, Apr 28, 2005 03:28

OK Mr Innocent (Orion) and you expect us to believe that?? If you don't know any swear words then I'm the Virgin Mary!! lol....
And fugly DEFINITELY does not apply to the beautiful Moonray!
I'm wearing my favorite jeans and my favorite cowboy boots - real python skin - ooh la la!! See?? I didn't deviate from the original thread people: ooh la la: a popular French expression meaning "baby that's hot!"

  


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