Bipolar Disorder Message Board

  • View author's info posted on Apr 05, 2006 08:01


    Bonnie88 write:
    Thanks Weelassy and WWW for your encouragement and compassion. I now sympathise with people who suffer from mental health problems and their loved ones who have to live with them and care for them. True unconditional love is constantly tested when you live with invisible illness of the mind.

    I get up each morning to call him at school to wake him up and make sure he is not too idle and bored or depressed with his lessons and work. Then again at night to make sure he takes his medication. Observing for side effects of the medication requires a very detail observation of the patient constantly and his reactions to events and interaction with others.
    I am deeply grateful to the staff at his school for spotting the problem and we are able to arrest it before it got too far. They were also kind enough to take him back inspite of his dabbling with cannabis which triggered his condition in the first place.
    Compassion, patience and empathy are so vital when dealing with sufferers of mental illness and I guess my son has opened a whole new area of education for me.
    Our journey through life sure takes us to the most unexpected adventures and locations..and encounter the most unusual of friends..thanks for being there for me.

    alter ego. miss wee also tortures and makes fun of some of us bi-polars, not kewl, but cruel, and bad taste too...
  • View author's info posted on Mar 22, 2006 23:09


    Thanks Weelassy and WWW for your encouragement and compassion. I now sympathise with people who suffer from mental health problems and their loved ones who have to live with them and care for them. True unconditional love is constantly tested when you live with invisible illness of the mind.

    I get up each morning to call him at school to wake him up and make sure he is not too idle and bored or depressed with his lessons and work. Then again at night to make sure he takes his medication. Observing for side effects of the medication requires a very detail observation of the patient constantly and his reactions to events and interaction with others.
    I am deeply grateful to the staff at his school for spotting the problem and we are able to arrest it before it got too far. They were also kind enough to take him back inspite of his dabbling with cannabis which triggered his condition in the first place.
    Compassion, patience and empathy are so vital when dealing with sufferers of mental illness and I guess my son has opened a whole new area of education for me.
    Our journey through life sure takes us to the most unexpected adventures and locations..and encounter the most unusual of friends..thanks for being there for me.
  • View author's info posted on Mar 20, 2006 20:38


    Bonnie88 write:
    www.
    Thanks for starting this section of the MM forum on mental health a long time ago. I never thought then that it could be so relevant to me and that my own son could be a victim of such a painful problem.

    He is on the mend and hopefully regain his normal self though he finds it extremely tired and sleeps alot under this medication.

    I am aware that a lot of creative people in the film and arts world ar prone to bi-polarism and mental depression due to their mercurial emotional and sensitive make-up. He manifests all these creative signs but I just hope that it will not be a lifelong issue.


    Apparently with bi-polar there is a great temptation to not take the meds because the highs are so good and you can be so productive. Make sure you son understands how it works.

    wwww
  • View author's info posted on Mar 20, 2006 15:08


    Oh my Bonnie. I am very sorry to hear your unfortunate experience and sadness. I am sure your son will receive the up most care from a medical team. You are a very strong articulate intelligent women/Mother. You have always demonstrated reasoning and brilliance to all that encounter you.

    I do hope though you have continued to sooth your soul during this time. I have always adored you for your strength. Your Lad is one lucky kid to have you as a Mom.

    Everything will work out my friend.

    Weelassy1
  • View author's info posted on Mar 20, 2006 08:45


    It is a cruel illness, I have had for years, it has no boundries of who can have it...Great views...
  • View author's info posted on Mar 19, 2006 02:16


    www.
    Thanks for starting this section of the MM forum on mental health a long time ago. I never thought then that it could be so relevant to me and that my own son could be a victim of such a painful problem.

    He is on the mend and hopefully regain his normal self though he finds it extremely tired and sleeps alot under this medication.

    I am aware that a lot of creative people in the film and arts world ar prone to bi-polarism and mental depression due to their mercurial emotional and sensitive make-up. He manifests all these creative signs but I just hope that it will not be a lifelong issue.
  • View author's info posted on Mar 18, 2006 19:43


    Bonnie, I am so happy to hear that your son is doing well.

    I do encourage everyone to study and learn about the various disorders. They greatly impact our lives, often by people you don't even know. May great things have been accomplished by people with the bi-polar disorder. Do a search for famous people that are bi-polar. You won't believe the results.
  • View author's info posted on Mar 17, 2006 01:53


    Poet,
    Thanks for all your insightful info on your condition. My son recently had a psychotic condition triggered by his dabbling in cannabis at a party . He spent 2 weeks in psychiatric ward and is now stable on medication and back at school. His condition was caused primarily from not having grieved properly the death of his father at an early age and the recent rejection by his first girlfriend.
    I hope this is only a one-off episode and that it will not repeat or become full blown schizophrenia later in life.

    Like you, he is brilliant and a natural poet and speaks at full speed with all his ideas. He read CAmus on 'Existentialism' at 13 and wrote his own play, he is in the main roles of all the school plays and is an anarchic poet recognised by Poet laureate and his English master as a potential Shelley or Ginsberg..an emotional and sensitive boy who feels misunderstood..
    Your rendition of your own personality has made me aware of my own son's personality and characteristic.
    'Normality' is such an elusive word in mental health ..He was always eccentric and specially imaginative and creative that I could never tell what is 'normal' in his personality. I sometimes wonder about myself whether I am 'normal'..what constitutes 'normality' and 'others'..has become a profound issue with me as I observe life through my son's perspective and learn to undestand his inner psyche without being swept away by his charismatic, obsessive , warm, humourous , impulsive
    personality..
    HIs condition has led me to read and understand more about what it is to be plagued by this invisible mental condition that is so hard to detect.
  • View author's info Photo Verified posted on Jan 06, 2006 12:21


    Hi Poet & Belle,

    Kudos to you both for being so honest about yourselves. It seems there are still many taboos in society & mental health is one of them. My late husband was bipolar (manic depressive) probably his entire life, but was only diagnosed about 1 month before he passed away.

    I spent 30 yrs. with him, life was always like walking on eggshells, you never knew what kind of mood he'd be in, huge mood swings, compulsive buying (I joked & said he had "10 of" disease), impulse control issues, etc. The psychiatrist said bipolars will generally pick someone very strong & stable to partner with, it helps keep them in check. We separated for 10 mos. & I told him "I'm the glue, you're going to come undone" when we initially separated, but had no idea how rapidly it would happen nor how true my words would turn out to be.

    Once diagnosed, they prescribed meds which take about 2 wks. to kick in & it just wasn't enough, he was gone within 2 days, severely depressed & took his own life. Suicide is another totally taboo subject, yet when I spoke to others, found many had had someone in their life commit suicide.

    Looking back on it all, it made sense this bipolar disorder, it helped me greatly come to terms with what had happened, but infuriated & saddened me to see how ineffective our mental health care system truly was.

    I've read many statistics on how many people are struggling with some sort of mental health issue & it was a staggering figure of 50% of the population!

    I think it remarkable that you help others with mental health issues, the more we talk about it, the less the stigma, and who better than someone who's actually experienced it.

    Keep well
  • View author's info posted on Dec 29, 2005 11:08


    I am a 26 year old Bipolar and ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) female. I was diagnosed 2 years ago. I agree that writing helps my mental illness. For someone who is not Bipolar it is hard for them to understand why my moods change so often and why I don't have a reason for them changing. When I joined this sitte I had full intentions on having my picture online but I have not come to that point yet I still have a lot of self-esteem issues but some days I don't. Other people who are Bipolar tell me it gets better with age but it doesn't seem like it will.
  • View author's info posted on Dec 27, 2005 10:17


    I had a younger boyfriend for 8.5 years that is Bipolar, OCD (Obcessive Complusive Disorder), and has a Personality Anxiety Disorder. He went undiagnoised and untreated his whole life until 2 years after we met when I told him we had to go see a therapist for help. He wouldn't stay on his medication and that eventually brought our living together statis to an end. He has been moved out for 2.5 years, but we stay in contact daily because I am the only one who understands him and will listen to him for who he really is. He is under the care of a psychiatrist now, and for the first time in his life he is holding down a real job. It is a tough world for anyone with these mental illnesses. And it is even tougher for us who try to help them.
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