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Bipolar Disorder
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Posted on Sat, Dec 24, 2005 07:23

I didn't see this one listed and to me it's a very important one. The stigma of being mentally ill,(bipolar) in this instance...
In my own findings, most people cannot distinguish or tell when someone is bipolar. What they may call "crazy, looney, or otherwise" in other words they have no idea this person is bipolar, I know I am one of them. Of course this varies upon the depth of the illness and ones own inner strength and drive.
This makes dating and relationships difficult for some of my fellow bipolarians. It has been hard for me as well. You have to be in those shoes, so to speak to really understand this issue. It has been with me my whole life and I deal with it as best as I possibly can. My writing helps and so does helping others who are mentally ill. Words or titles such as visionary, eccentric, enigma have been placed on me as well as crazy, looney funny and wild! To me this is a great compliment. I see life in my own special way I feel and see so deeply that words cannot express in totality what I would like to say. This is what drives me to write my poetry, philosophy erotica and novels. My escape into deep thought and expression is through my writing and my goal to help others is very rewarding. I have nothing to hide and am proud of who I am. Check out my site its called moodcycles.
Lauri A Nally

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Posted on Sun, Mar 09, 2008 12:28

Quoting Belle2000:

I am a 26 year old Bipolar and ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) female. I was diagnosed 2 years ago. I agree that writing helps my mental illness. For someone who is not Bipolar it is hard for them to understand why my moods change so often and why I don't have a reason for them changing. When I joined this sitte I had full intentions on having my picture online but I have not come to that point yet I still have a lot of self-esteem issues but some days I don't. Other people who are Bipolar tell me it gets better with age but it doesn't seem like it will.


I like your point on this... I was made fun of by several on this site and it is cruel and sad people making fun of others about this... Nice to see I'm not alone...



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Posted on Sun, Dec 30, 2007 12:16

I liked your comments, they made sense, my husband was severely bi-polar, i always say he was a genius but with genius comes insanity and we had alot of it. People would be amazed to know the percentage of high level CEO/doctors/and other highly brilliant individuals have this disorder. Also close to 80% of males incarcerated are diagnosed with it. It has a heavy impact on drug and alcohol abuse, medications like Zyprexa, which my husband took only lesson the manic up's, we focused and worked every moment to help him try to stay balanced. Unfortunately he passed away this past Oct 5th, in his sleep from a heart attack. We shared 14 amazing, terrifying, and perfect years together. Anyone who has this disorder, find a med that works for you, but remember the med is not a cure, it is a tool to help you focus enough to actually work your way through your daily life. Good Luck to all of you!



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Posted on Sat, Jul 21, 2007 05:39

It's been my experience that "fuzzy Diagnosis codes" are applied to MI Issues, directly tied to $$$ available to treatment, under insurance.

I am aware of "pressures' placed on LMHP's,et al, to nudge things to AXIS I Dx codes, due to re-imbursement schedules of Health Insurers. (ie BP treatment is a covered expense)

Axis II disorders, such as BPD can "mimic" BP , although there are subtle differences (ie. length of duration,Intensity, control,etc) and they are not "Covered" expenses for Health Insurance.

I am a survivor of a long-term BP/BPD marriage--a "Non" in the parlance of BPD.
Dealing with the Psych community as a "Non" was/is difficult, as she would constantly change providers, once a clear picture of her true MI issues/Hx was present. The application of HIPPA does not help much either. Co-parenting is complex and difficult in this situation.

Not a condemnation of the Professional MI community, rather an observation.

Leaving Issues of Stigma aside, what can you offer "Non's/ Significant Others" and the patients themselves, to deal with the constant chaos and confusion presented by these difficult patients/ Spouses ??

Kreiger, Lawson, et al write that distance, detachment, and boundaries are the most effective tools available to "Nons". Meanwhile ongoing distortion campaigns and manipulations make this an extremely difficult undertaking.

Any insights you could provide would be appreciated.

Thanks.



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Posted on Sun, Mar 18, 2007 19:36

Hello to the many bloggers on Bipolar Disorder. I'm a psychiatrist who wants to share the way we conceptualize the range of things that include bipolarity. It's not helpful to see it as purely biological, as at the least, the person and those involved with them have had their development changed by it. There've been psychosocial impacts and results, as well as the mood and irritability problems of the disorder. And, somewhat unfortunately, we don't know the full scope of benefit of the newer medications, but so much good has been done by them, that it's difficult to not try them in people whose mood problems really relate 1st to their personalities, and relationship excesses and deficits. So people get labeled as "Bipolar" to get insurances to pay for medication trials. And they do often help! So we have cures searching for diseases, while we retool and the field gets defined and expands. It's unfortunate that those who have the true bipolar disorders have to be associated with those who get that label as a secondary diagnosis. A great number of personality disordered people can be made available for psychotherapy, when their mood problems are stabilized a bit. Unfortunately, they often want to call themselves Bipolar. The same thing is true for those with schizophrenia, and "bipolar" meds are used there too. Interestingly, things are coming together with the meds for mood and thinking problems: Risperdal, Zyprexa, Seroquel, Geodon, and Abilify are all now approved for bipolar conditions, and Lithium, Tegretol, Depakote, and Lamictal often can help in the management of thinking disorders like schizophrenia, as well as those with personality disorders. The point I want to make: You make multiple diagnoses, and there's overlap with mood, thinking, and personality. Most people still need therapy no matter what brain problem is on "Axis I"; everybody still has a personality, on "Axis II". The mix of all, makes presentations and treatments complex & confusing.

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Posted on Fri, Mar 16, 2007 10:28

Very accurate poem for bi-polar. I myself and at least one of my daughters have been diagnosed. With the possibility of 2 more having it. I also suffer from PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder and ADD (attention deficit disorder) and a few minor compulsive disorders. My couselor informed me that it was actually common for people with bi-polar to have at least one more disorder if not mutiple ones. I also suffer with an ex-spouse who does not understand and thinks it is all just a bunch of crap. He doesn't comprehend that there are actually mental disorders and illnesses. But then again he is an alcoholic and addict along with a few other things. This has definitely made it hard for me and especially my daughters over the years as he has said derogitive things about the bi-polar. My daughters and I are one meds and each of us take different things. As someone else stated bi-polar effects each person differently. We are also recieving counseling. Someone stated that alot of times people stop taking the meds because they start getting better, this is true, but they also sometimes stop because they feel the meds are not helping. My daughter has done this in the past and her doctor and I have finally convinced her to not stop taking them untill we consult with the doctor first. It is very important to stay on the meds unless your doctor tells you to stop them. Well, I think I have rambled on enough now. Again the poem about bi-polar is an accurate one.



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Posted on Mon, Mar 05, 2007 19:15

i would have to admit that i also have Bi-polor disorder. was told by doctors up at va in topeka kansas that I was by-polor but I also have post tramatict stress disordeer on top of the bi-polor disorder. I haave my good days and my bad days and up most nights at the truckstop here in Emporia Kansas. Every one have a good evening Catch every one later.
Charlie



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Posted on Wed, Jan 10, 2007 22:06

Wow. This forum has been a huge eye-opener! I have heard a lot about children's bipolar d. but never really thought of it as an adult problem. I just broke up with a man I really care for but I could never understand nor did I know what to expect from him from one minute to the next. He hurts all those around him as if he were constantly testing them until he finally pushes too far. Of course he will never admit to this. It's everyone else who is unworthy. and then...He is the best guy in the world!
I knew he had some issues (don't we all? lol)but reading these posts makes me think he might be in more trouble than he is aware of. I am very saddened but enlightened. Thanks everyone for sharing



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Posted on Sat, Dec 30, 2006 19:03

There are now some medical imaging tests that can very accurately diagnose bi-polar and other disorders. There is a Dr. Amen who runs a series of clinics that has done the most work. Search for Amen Clinic to find his web site. Sadly, these studies are not YET covered by insurance, however, as someone familiar with the technology, it works. It is similar to routine studies for heart problems and cancer. It has been around for 20 years, but for some reason, virtually no one is doing it even though each year there are about 40 to 50 studies published in peer reviewed journals. If anyone has any questions, feel free to email me. (No, I am not affiliated with Dr. Amen, though I do know people who work there.)



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Posted on Sat, Oct 07, 2006 13:55

My son is Bipolar too. He was diagnosed 2 years ago. He is now 16 years old and doing a lot better on his medication. He is a brillant artist. He loves to make up his own comic book heroes and stories for them.He is very quiet and shy around people. His biggest fear is people will find out about his illness. He is ashamed that he has the illness. He is in counceling which helps a lot. I hope someday he will realize there is nothing to be ashamed of and that he will come out of his coccoon more beautiful than ever.



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Posted on Sat, Oct 07, 2006 13:48

To BigBozMaam. I love your poem it sums everything up about Bipolar. I have had the illness all my life but I was only diagnosed 4 years ago. The diagnoses finally made my life make sense. All the weird thoughts and impulses I have had all my life. I cried when they finally diagnosed me. I stay on my medicine long enough to take the edge off and but not enough to clip my inspirational "wings". I love to write when I am soaring. I stay up all night sometimes. I just have to be careful of the "cranial" landings. The worst part of my illness is if I am having a "normal" bad day everyone asks "did you take your pill today?" I hate that. People need to realize that we do have "normal" bad days like them. If you want to try something interesting marry another Bipolar with different swings... life is never dull. Loving a Bipolar person is not hard just different.



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Posted on Fri, Jul 28, 2006 21:25

Mental health issues need a lot of patience and strong boundaries. I think the hardest things include finding a good therapist and getting on the correct medicine and dosage. If I had a child or relative with mental health issues, I would have a brain scan done because too many people are miss diagnosed because some of the behaviors overlap into other disorders. The scan can tell the Drs. what part of the brain is not working correctly. The different disorders affect different areas of the brain.
The sad thing is that a number of adults with mental health disorders stop taking their meds. One reason is that they are better so they feel they don't need them anymore when the meds are what is making them better. Other people just don't make any effort to help themselves.

I work with kids with mental health issues, and I know parents have a long road ahead of them. Some parents will never get any rest.



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Posted on Thu, Jul 13, 2006 07:24

Quick update --- son is still taking his meds on schedule and we haven't had any mood extremes since he's been on the meds. If only they had figured this out when he was 5 or 6 instead of 17----his life could've been much different up until now. I'm glad I stuck to my instincts as a mom and didn't throw him to the wolves!!

Life is just beginning for him now!!



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Posted on Thu, Jul 06, 2006 23:01

dearest Bonnie,

Im sorry to inform you that bipolar is a life long disoreder not an illness !!! Its a chemical imbalance in our brains that our bodies cant produce the proper ones to keep us stable!!! However sweetheart there is much to educatenot only yourself but your son on this matter!!! Each one of us out here that are bipolar are completely differnt in our symptoms and what treatment will work for one may not for the other!!!!! this is why the education is so vital to your sons wellbeing you should know all the meds out there as well treatment even then you some times must takes parts of this and parts of that to help him as well yourself!!! Proper diet and exersise are vital to his well being and can help reduce the amount of meds for him!!! sunlight in the winter is a big key to for we all now about winter depression and we as bipolars suffer most then!!!! One more thing and i will stop lecturing to you GRAPEFRUIT IS A BIG NO NO NO NO NOOOOO WHAT IT DOSE IS ATACHES ITS SELF TO THE MEDICATION HE IS ON AND WILL LITERALLY PULL IT OUT OF HIS BODY DOING HIM NO GOOD!!!!!!!

thank you for hearing me and hope i may nave helped some of you out there!!!!


BEST REGUARDS,

~TOM~

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Posted on Mon, Jun 05, 2006 06:54

Lifesaver_notTHEcandy write:
cutiepie01 write:
There is a study being done that has shown great progress using timed release niacin for depression, shizophrenia and other mental disorders. Its important to use the timed release, but also the flush niacin gives a fast relief for other problems. Its all on the web, check it out.

The website would be helpful if you have it.

I sent you some of the information in email. MM doesnt seem to like it when you post other website names on here. LOL.



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Posted on Sat, Jun 03, 2006 15:58

cutiepie01 write:
There is a study being done that has shown great progress using timed release niacin for depression, shizophrenia and other mental disorders. Its important to use the timed release, but also the flush niacin gives a fast relief for other problems. Its all on the web, check it out.

The website would be helpful if you have it.



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Posted on Sat, Jun 03, 2006 15:57

BigBozMaam write:
Lifesaver_notTHEcandy writes:

Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

Boz says.. "can I lay down on your couch"?

Ahh...sure? I'm not a therapist however.



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Posted on Sat, Jun 03, 2006 09:51

There is a study being done that has shown great progress using timed release niacin for depression, shizophrenia and other mental disorders. Its important to use the timed release, but also the flush niacin gives a fast relief for other problems. Its all on the web, check it out.



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Posted on Sat, Jun 03, 2006 09:42

Lifesaver_notTHEcandy writes:

Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

Boz says.. "can I lay down on your couch"?

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Posted on Sat, Jun 03, 2006 06:05

Lifesaver_notTHEcandy write:
I find that the biggest problem with any mental illness is the fact that the patients in question have difficulty accepting the fact that they "need" medication. Please allow me to say this.

Needing to take any medication for any chemical imbalance is NO DIFFERENT than a diabetic needing insulin. You just are not producing something that your body needs. It really is as simple as that. Medications prescribed for depression do NOT make you "abnormal". They just bring you up to where you should be to be "normal"...just as insulin does for a diabetic. There is no need to feel as if you are "crazy or insane" as I have read.

On another note. It should also be mentioned that once you find the correct medication that works for you, you need to speak to your doctor to decide if you should stay on it. Many patients start to feel better and stop taking their medication...and they soon start to have their old symptoms again.

But please, do NOT feel as if you are an "outcast", there is nothing wrong with needing help with any health issue. This one in particular is very common and you are not alone.

I agree with you wholeheartedly.....I could not have put it any more than you have already.....Well done..

  


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