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All Your Wine Related Questions ?..... Sort by:
emmanuel...
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Posted on Thu, Jul 04, 2013 05:44

Hi SL

St. Agnes... a vin de paille and a Vidal Icewine  Glen Sutton. Quebec Oh Canada. We do have more than snow.

bonjour cherie



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Diana33...
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Posted on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 22:45

Awww…thanks SL.  You are very kind….and I appreciate that you didn’t say I look like Barbara Streisand.  Lololol…..*wink* 



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Posted on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 13:45

Quoting Mtnsunny:

My knowledge on wine is very limited....but the one thing I do know, is that Moscato is a wonderful dessert wine.   A sweet wine is a sweet wine, like a Sweet Riesling, but a dessert wine...is different,  light bodied, almost a perfume like fragrance (aromatic), and a little on the sparkling side.  What's your thoughts on dessert wines SL?  Who makes some of the best Moscatos?

 

 

Mtnsunny :)


~~ Mtnsunny ~~  &  Lulu  ~~

 

 

My recollection of  " Moscato " ..... is that firstly it's the Italian word for  "Muscat "  grapes of which there are at least four principal varieties in several hues making for wines of various colors, from white to red and a few in-between. The main character of Muscats,  is the aromatic....    " musk " like perfume.

 

 

In Italy these Muscats are known as....Moscato Bianco,  Giallo,  Rosa Trentini, and Alexandria.  To add to the confusion, bottles are usually labelled according to Region instead of the specific grape variety. For example, Moscato di Asti is made from the historic white  " Bianco " version typical of the Piedmont Region, whereas Moscato Giallo and Rosa Trentini from Alto Adige, are Golden and Pink respectively.

 

 

A Drier, crisper style of Moscato is produced in the Trentino Region. The majority of Moscatos are low in alcohol, at least lightly sweet, pair well with fruit and fruit based desserts. Due to their intense perfume, often regarded as Dessert Wines, but are not the best examples of such.

 

 

True Dessert Wines are made from grapes that attract Botrytis or " Noble Rot "....which increases the levels of Tartaric Acid and Grape Sugars. This stimulates the production of Glycerol that gives the wine its Viscosity and impact the aromas and flavors in the finished wines.

 

 

Best examples are from Sauternes, south of Bordeaux and unmatched by any other global wine region in the production of  " Unfortified " Sweet Dessert Wines.  Varietals in Sauternes are strictly Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle with blending allowed.

 

 

Many other so called Dessert Wines often contain grape consentrates which is allowed in California where chaptalisation is illegal ?.....go figure...!.

 

 

Stay Sweet,

 

 

~~ S L ~~



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RealtorLu...
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Posted on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 05:59

No other fruits than grapes is an eye opener. I could've sworn there were several other fruits in that wine. 

 

I appreciate that you're taking the time to educate us in this topic. I had figured that pressing the grapes may have been for the purpose of extracting just the juice in order to get a finer wine and crushing was to get stronger flavors as in the dryer wines. Thanks SL!

 

Mtnsunny, I've never been a fan of Moscato but if SL gives us a recommendation I will try it. It is nice to have a nice dessert wine after a good meal.

 

All the best, -Lulu-



Lulu in Dallas

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Posted on Sun, Jun 30, 2013 20:20

Quoting RealtorLulu:

Wow! That's a lot of information on a subject we all seem to love. Thanks SL for sharing your knowledge. I have always wondered about the various types of wine and how the grapes and other ingredients were chosen. Like Hope, I was a white wine drinker but have come to prefer Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah and Pino.

 

 

 

One thing I thought was that Riesling was always sweet. I thought of it as a dessert wine. I will have to check out the dry Riesling.

 

 

 

Question: I heard someone talking about crushing and pressing the grapes. What's the difference?

 

 

 

While I was living in California, I had a chance to taste some wine from several wineries and was a member of one of them.  I was once invited to a private wine tasting 7 course dinner in Palm Springs. One of the courses was served with a wine that after a few seconds I could recognize various fruit flavors. It was quite an adventure. I didn't realize that how many other fruits were used. 

 

 

 

Great info, thanks

 

 



~~ Realtor Lulu ~~

 

Answer to your question as to the difference between Crushing and Pressing is as follows...

 

1)  Crushing : Basic wine-making operation of breaking open the grape berries so that the juice is readily available to the yeast for fermentation. Modern equipment are called  " crusher de-stemmers " , removing all the stems only without crushing the seeds that can impart bitter tannins.

 

2 )  Pressing  :  Wine-making operation whereby pressure is applied to grapes or grape pomace in order to squeeze the liquid out of the solids. There are various types of equipment developed over the years to accomplish this.

 

In Red Wine production, pressing of the pomace is done after fermentation when sufficient color and tannins are extracted from the skins.  White grapes are normally pressed prior to fermentation as they are made with much less skin contact.

 

As for your wine tasting adventure, the fruit component in table wines come from the various grape varietals. Other fruits are not used to create this, unless a bottle is specifically labelled such as  " plum wine, peach wine " ...etc.

 

For quality grapes, remember it's all about.....location, location, location...just as in real estate !.

 

~~ S L ~~

 



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Posted on Sun, Jun 30, 2013 19:04

Quoting Diana3316:

Thank you SL for the different grapes.  I really did not know there were so many varieties.  Do white wines have resveratrol?  I like the whites, mostly because they do not cause the head congestion I often experience with the reds and they don't stain my teeth.  However sometimes they can seem a bit sour to me.

 

Last night I enjoyed a bottle of Pouilly-Fuisse.  I think it was a Chardonnay, yet it was quite devine....very smooth.  I believe it was bottled by Louis Jadot.  Can you tell me anything more about it?  Who is Louis Jadot?



~~ Dear Lady Di ~~

 

Oooh ! Sweetie...You are looking better than ever, It's the best photo to date.  Perhaps the work of all that Resveratrol. 

 

Speaking of which and to answer your question regarding its content in White Wines....Yes it is found in all grape products including raisins and juice. Keep in mind that Resveratrol is a phenolic compound of grape skins, so eating fresh grapes could be just as benificial.  Variety and regions impact the concentration levels.  For example Pinot Noir has higher levels than Cabernet Sauvignon and wines from cooler regions such as Burgandy and New York have even higher levels than those from hot dry regions such as California and Australia.

 

Pouilly-Fuissé  is made exclusively from Chardonnay Grapes as restricted by the A O C  in the Màcconias district of Burgandy. Normally bottled after a year of barrel maturation they are capable of ageing well there-after. 

 

Louis Jadot Family from Belgium has a long history having purchased their first vineyards in 1826 and founded the winery in 1859.  I believe their success and fame is due to the region in Southern Burgandy where the grapes are grown in  " sun traps ".

 

The Sour taste in some white wines are generally from damaged grapes caused by bird pecks, high humidity and over irrigation that causes the berries to split and oxidize. Could also be from faulty screw top closures.

 

Keep on Smiling....

 

~~ S L ~~



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RealtorLu...
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Posted on Sun, Jun 30, 2013 09:04

Wow! That's a lot of information on a subject we all seem to love. Thanks SL for sharing your knowledge. I have always wondered about the various types of wine and how the grapes and other ingredients were chosen. Like Hope, I was a white wine drinker but have come to prefer Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah and Pino.

 

 

 

One thing I thought was that Riesling was always sweet. I thought of it as a dessert wine. I will have to check out the dry Riesling.

 

 

 

Question: I heard someone talking about crushing and pressing the grapes. What's the difference?

 

 

 

While I was living in California, I had a chance to taste some wine from several wineries and was a member of one of them.  I was once invited to a private wine tasting 7 course dinner in Palm Springs. One of the courses was served with a wine that after a few seconds I could recognize various fruit flavors. It was quite an adventure. I didn't realize that how many other fruits were used. 

 

 

 

Great info, thanks

 

 


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Lulu in Dallas

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Posted on Sat, Jun 29, 2013 21:36

Thank you SL for the different grapes.  I really did not know there were so many varieties.  Do white wines have resveratrol?  I like the whites, mostly because they do not cause the head congestion I often experience with the reds and they don't stain my teeth.  However sometimes they can seem a bit sour to me.

 

Last night I enjoyed a bottle of Pouilly-Fuisse.  I think it was a Chardonnay, yet it was quite devine....very smooth.  I believe it was bottled by Louis Jadot.  Can you tell me anything more about it?  Who is Louis Jadot?


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Posted on Sat, Jun 29, 2013 05:37

Quoting AURORADORADA:

 

Monsieur SL,

I would apprecciate if you explain what does it means exacly the metaphor "wine legs" "wine tears".

Merci,

Auroradorada

 


~~ Auroradorada ~~

 

 

Thanks for the nice picture along with your question.  You have telepathic powers, since the explanation regarding Legs vs Tears was written at the time that you were pondering about it. Kindly see a few posts below this response.

 

 

I hope it is sufficient to clear the mystique for you ?. Feel free with any others that come to mind.

 

 

~~ S L ~~

 

 



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Posted on Sat, Jun 29, 2013 04:20

Quoting silverlion:

~~ Hi Sarah ~~

 

Personally I believe the true and finest  Rosé Wines are produced in the Provence Region. Fortunately for you Majestic Wines in Livingston, I recall it being on Almondvale Blvd.  is doing an in store tasting from 28 th june to 4 th July, on Rosé Wines from Provence. 

 

Your best bet is to head on down and taste what they have to offer and it's free.  I'm confident you may find some that excite your palette within budget.

 

I suggest You also get some Sparkling Rosé from Spain while there. Sparklig Wines from Spain are the Best Deals on the Global Market and of fine quality.

 

Take Care and Keep us posted on your findings.

 

~~ S L ~~



Thank you S.L. I shall have to check this out.

 

Sarah :-)



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Posted on Fri, Jun 28, 2013 14:44

 

Monsieur SL,

I would apprecciate if you explain what does it means exacly the metaphor "wine legs" "wine tears".

Merci,

Auroradorada

 



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Posted on Fri, Jun 28, 2013 06:10

~~ To All Members ~~

 

Tears  vs  Legs ! .....in a wine glass

 

I had a member ask me privately, what exactly this meant ?...

 

Both these words are used to describe the same behaviour of the surface wine layer seen on the inside of a partially filled glass.  It was thought that this is a reaction between ahcohol and glycerol, a by product in wines that create viscosity.

 

Wine is mainly a solution of alcohol and water with grape flavor components. When the film of wine climbs up on the glass surface, the alcohol evaporates faster than the water creating Tears or Legs and the subsequent droplets.

 

Neither Pure Water Nor Pure Alcohol does this. Tears require air to form and ceases if the glass is covered.  It is more visible in wines with higher alcohol levels.

 

The word " Legs " is more popular in the Western World while  " Tears "  is largely a European choice..... Hmm !.

 

~~ S L ~~



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Posted on Thu, Jun 27, 2013 05:35

Quoting Curious2078:

Thanks so much for this answer to Orlando's question, Silver.  I used to buy Riesling, a number of years ago--forget the brand--that was wonderfully dry, and I loved it.  One day I picked up a different brand and found it sweet as soda pop.  I eventually Googled Riesling and that's when I discovered it can vary from very dry to very sweet.  What confusion!!!  I still find myself arguing with people who insist that Reisling is ALWAYS dry--or the opposite; that it's always a sweet wine.

 

So much confusion.  Thanks so much for your most generous tutorials.  I'm finding them most enlightening.  However, I still remain confused.  So much information!  So little time to digest it all.  LOLOL

 

Pat 



~~ Curious ~~

 

Thanks for bringing up the  " confusion "  issue, you are not alone on this.  I will clarify to help solve the mystery....

 

Riesling is the name of a grape varietal just as Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah etc. etc...  and has no bearing wheter or not,  the wines produced from them are always Sweet or always Dry.  That is purely up to The Wine-maker.  In other words, any style of wine can be produced from any grape varietal.

 

In general the more aromatic varietals are the grapes of choice in Sweet Wine production. The addition of sugar during fermentation,  known as  " chaptalisation " is another factor. It is illegal in some countries yet allowed in others.  Same with Acids.

 

Hope this helps your Curious mind.

 

~~ S L ~~

 



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Posted on Wed, Jun 26, 2013 16:16

Quoting Mtnsunny:

~Hi SL~

I was wondering if you have ever tried any Canadian wines?  I have heard a lot of rave reviews from the wine that is coming out of the Similkameen River Valley.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge on wines, enjoying your blog.

Mtnsunny


~~ MtnSunny ~~

 

 

Aaah ! Yes my Dear... I am quite familiar with the Wine History of Canada and could write a book on it.  Small one though. 

 

 

For Starters the whole  " Ice Wine "  thing... where the Canadian V.Q.A. set the minimum Residual Sugar levels at  a whopping 35° Brix. much higher than those for Germany's " Eiswein " .   Back in 1991,  A Canadian Icewine which was technically  illegal in Europe had won a Gold Medal at Vinexpo in Bordeaux ?.... much to the surprise of many.

 

 

Similkameen region, on the other hand is focused on the Alsace varietals and doing fine. Personally, I think it has potential to produce some terrific Sparkling Wines in the " Brut "  category....  would love to give it a shot, ... someday perhaps... who knows.

 

 

Now where is that Amazing Hat Picture of yours ?.... love it.

 

 

~~ S L ~~

 

 

 

 



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Posted on Wed, Jun 26, 2013 15:17

Quoting silverlion:

~~ Orlando ~~

 

To answer your questions Professor.....

 

1 )  Perhaps due the members here who mentioned that this is a refreshing topic or the followers I have from C A.  who had joined my old wine-club back there.  Personally I feel that single or not, many of us enjoy a relaxing glass of Wine with Dinner.

 

2 )  For a good Dry Riesling, may I suggest these notable producers from Alsace :  Zind Humbrect,  Fréderic Emile, Boxler Sommeberg, and Bott Geyl.  The 2008 vintage from any of these producers are good Dry examples as the it was a cool growing season that enhanced acid levels while keeping the grape sugars on the low side.  

 

A good rule of thumb to find a Dry Riesling in your local store, is to look for the alcohol levels.  Anything with 13° plus is an indicator that most of the grape sugars have been converted to alcohol, leaving little or No Residual Sugar.

 

Your Student,

 

~~ S L ~~



Thanks so much for this answer to Orlando's question, Silver.  I used to buy Riesling, a number of years ago--forget the brand--that was wonderfully dry, and I loved it.  One day I picked up a different brand and found it sweet as soda pop.  I eventually Googled Riesling and that's when I discovered it can vary from very dry to very sweet.  What confusion!!!  I still find myself arguing with people who insist that Reisling is ALWAYS dry--or the opposite; that it's always a sweet wine.

 

So much confusion.  Thanks so much for your most generous tutorials.  I'm finding them most enlightening.  However, I still remain confused.  So much information!  So little time to digest it all.  LOLOL

 

Pat 



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Posted on Wed, Jun 26, 2013 13:52

Quoting Hoping4Love2000:

OMG! The Princess has died and gone to heaven! Our very own tutorial on grapes!! I had no idea you make wine.. I'LL BE RIGHT OVER!! ;)

 

Okay SL (and IC, of course..)...

 

I have SEVERAL questions!!

 

1) In much younger years I drank white wine more than red. NOW, I find I drink red... NEVER white!! Have my taste buds changed? I'm a bit confused as I have drank ALL types of alcohol, from tequilla to whiskey to mescal, BUT, vodka has and I guess always will be, a main staple in my house. So why the change for me in wine? Have you known anyone else who has flip-flopped? 

 

2) I understand from my liquor store owner in Atlanta, Cabs are #1 sellers.. HANDS DOWN.. Your thoughts? From what I recall... He said Cabs are bolder, but can even range in boldness from cab to cab? If I recall, he said Noir is a tier above cab in boldness and Shiraz above this?

Would you mind explaining the "simple" elements of the reds for us? (and even whites?)

 

Now, at this very moment, I am sipping on something called a "Summer Red" SL, what the heck is that? I saw that it was a lighter red, but it was the only red anything they had at General Dollar and I saw it was BAREFOOT, a fairly decent, low cost brand to keep at home, so I decided to try it. Now I do not ever chill reds, but this seems more of a -- well, I honestly do not know!! So I did place it in fridge. It is lighter and sweeter. I am not caring for it anywhere near as I do my RM Cab or Pinot Noir..  which have kind of become staples here, as it is only a little more costly than say the Livingston or some other cheaper brands. 

 

WHY does this taste ... carbonated? (Is this what I am tastng?) WHY is it so sweet? 

What makes the sparkly, bubbly wines? 

I've drank more champagne lately, so the "bubbly wines" are nore tolerable than previously, but,,,, some of this is too sweet... 

 

So to reiterate the lady earlier, twist / cork? I don't often use twist.... doesn't feel right. 

 

And BRAVO to her BOX WINE sign!! I dated one primary care doc who kept "Black Box" wine... That IS possibly the best.. but, NO THANK YOU... 

 

Wine headaches????? (Sugar content? Does even natural sugar create this?) 

 

I realise these are many questions, but I am with our Lovely Lady DI here.. The men I date always order the wine. When he asks me, I just "gladly" play the "lady" role ... BUT, I would love to know more.. 

 

Okay, I have lots more questions for our "Wine Man," but I will leave you go for now!

 

But thanks for a truly informative blog that keeps our viewers in the "POSITIVE" mode.. 

 

It was getting a bit redundant hearing about how online dating stinks, everybody lies, we are all getting divorced... and that's only IF we are lucky enough to find a man, because men.. are so much more attractive than women... 

 

I'm ready for class Inspector! ;)

 

Next time.. The "C's" 

Questions on Chocolate and Cheese!! 



~~ Hoping4Love ~~

 

Thanks for your observation regarding this topic keeping our viewers in a  " Positive "  mode.

 

Will do my best to address your slightly complex questions, so bear with me Dear....

 

1 )  Color of Wine is largely a personal " visual " choice.  70 % in a blind tasting could Not determine the color while tasting them blind-folded !.  

 

2 )  Cabernet Sauvignon may well be the best seller in Atlanta but White-Wine production clearly surpasses Reds by about 10 % in the U S .   To compare Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and  " Shiraz " ( Australian for Syrah ) for  " boldness " is ....ridiculous.  They are notable Varietals and the Wines from them will depend on many factors such as region, viticultural practice, vintage, harvest yields, and more importantly Wine-making styles such as extraction, rotary vs stationary fermentation, cooperage, ageing, fining and filtration levels.

 

3 )  Barefoot  " Summer Red "  is a blend of a few varietals, with Residual Sugar.  Savvy marketing at those who have a palette for cool sodas. The  " carbonated " taste is from Co2 induced into the wine, hence the fizz and is Not the traditional Methode Champenoise used to make quality Sparkling Wines.

 

4 )  Wine Headaches :  Generally from low quality sweet wines. Our warm tummies act as mini fermentation containers and may kick off a secondary fermentation on the Residual Sugars.  A by product of which is Co2 that can create headaches and or upset tummies.

 

Hope the above helps and look fore-ward to your questions on  The  " C's "....

 

~~ S L ~~



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Posted on Wed, Jun 26, 2013 11:04

Quoting Orlando__:

Two questions:

1.  How come you have so many views?

2.  I'm looking for a good Dry Riesling. Any suggestions?



~~ Orlando ~~

 

To answer your questions Professor.....

 

1 )  Perhaps due the members here who mentioned that this is a refreshing topic or the followers I have from C A.  who had joined my old wine-club back there.  Personally I feel that single or not, many of us enjoy a relaxing glass of Wine with Dinner.

 

2 )  For a good Dry Riesling, may I suggest these notable producers from Alsace :  Zind Humbrect,  Fréderic Emile, Boxler Sommeberg, and Bott Geyl.  The 2008 vintage from any of these producers are good Dry examples as the it was a cool growing season that enhanced acid levels while keeping the grape sugars on the low side.  

 

A good rule of thumb to find a Dry Riesling in your local store, is to look for the alcohol levels.  Anything with 13° plus is an indicator that most of the grape sugars have been converted to alcohol, leaving little or No Residual Sugar.

 

Your Student,

 

~~ S L ~~



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Posted on Wed, Jun 26, 2013 09:20

Quoting MsLovable2001:

dear SL :) 

 

Thank you first of all for your friendship, I really appreciate it. My question on wine are the following: Does having a screw top as oppose to cork influence the  quality of the wine? I have known people to refuse to drink from a screw top wine but they drink box wine.....LOL

Loo



~~ MsLovable ~~

 

Love your questions and the  " cardboardoux "  description for boxed Wines.... very creative !.

 

Screw tops have yet to prove itself the equal of cork for extended bottle ageing. They are convenient for small bottles used to serve airline passengers but unacceptable in the eyes of traditionalists.  It is an inexpensive closure for short term use and wine quality may be compromised as screw caps cannot compensate for bottle lips that are not perfect.

 

Boxed Wines are popular since they are better able to preserve any wine remaining in the container, due to the collapsable bag inside thus preventing rapid oxidation.  Kind of like a blood transfusion bag, if I may.   Best to consume in its youth after packaging.

 

Feel free with any others that come to mind and Thanks for Participating.

 

~~ S L ~~

 

 



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Posted on Tue, Jun 25, 2013 20:06

OMG! The Princess has died and gone to heaven! Our very own tutorial on grapes!! I had no idea you make wine.. I'LL BE RIGHT OVER!! ;)

 

Okay SL (and IC, of course..)...

 

I have SEVERAL questions!!

 

1) In much younger years I drank white wine more than red. NOW, I find I drink red... NEVER white!! Have my taste buds changed? I'm a bit confused as I have drank ALL types of alcohol, from tequilla to whiskey to mescal, BUT, vodka has and I guess always will be, a main staple in my house. So why the change for me in wine? Have you known anyone else who has flip-flopped? 

 

2) I understand from my liquor store owner in Atlanta, Cabs are #1 sellers.. HANDS DOWN.. Your thoughts? From what I recall... He said Cabs are bolder, but can even range in boldness from cab to cab? If I recall, he said Noir is a tier above cab in boldness and Shiraz above this?

Would you mind explaining the "simple" elements of the reds for us? (and even whites?)

 

Now, at this very moment, I am sipping on something called a "Summer Red" SL, what the heck is that? I saw that it was a lighter red, but it was the only red anything they had at General Dollar and I saw it was BAREFOOT, a fairly decent, low cost brand to keep at home, so I decided to try it. Now I do not ever chill reds, but this seems more of a -- well, I honestly do not know!! So I did place it in fridge. It is lighter and sweeter. I am not caring for it anywhere near as I do my RM Cab or Pinot Noir..  which have kind of become staples here, as it is only a little more costly than say the Livingston or some other cheaper brands. 

 

WHY does this taste ... carbonated? (Is this what I am tastng?) WHY is it so sweet? 

What makes the sparkly, bubbly wines? 

I've drank more champagne lately, so the "bubbly wines" are nore tolerable than previously, but,,,, some of this is too sweet... 

 

So to reiterate the lady earlier, twist / cork? I don't often use twist.... doesn't feel right. 

 

And BRAVO to her BOX WINE sign!! I dated one primary care doc who kept "Black Box" wine... That IS possibly the best.. but, NO THANK YOU... 

 

Wine headaches????? (Sugar content? Does even natural sugar create this?) 

 

I realise these are many questions, but I am with our Lovely Lady DI here.. The men I date always order the wine. When he asks me, I just "gladly" play the "lady" role ... BUT, I would love to know more.. 

 

Okay, I have lots more questions for our "Wine Man," but I will leave you go for now!

 

But thanks for a truly informative blog that keeps our viewers in the "POSITIVE" mode.. 

 

It was getting a bit redundant hearing about how online dating stinks, everybody lies, we are all getting divorced... and that's only IF we are lucky enough to find a man, because men.. are so much more attractive than women... 

 

I'm ready for class Inspector! ;)

 

Next time.. The "C's" 

Questions on Chocolate and Cheese!! 



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Posted on Tue, Jun 25, 2013 19:02

Quoting Diana3316:

Ahhh….this is most excellent!  What a treasure you are SL, to provide a free tutorial on a subject that many sophisticated individuals study for years to learn about.   Recently I had the pleasure of a French bottle of wine over dinner.  It was truly fabulous!  I had intended on remembering the Chateau in order to tell you about it, but now I have forgotten.  Drat! 

 

So why don’t you start with the basics?  Tell us about the grapes.  Specifically, I would be interested in the French grapes, as I recently read in a health magazine that French wines rank the highest in Resveratrol content, due to the moist climate.  Napa wines, my favorite prior to my dinner experience, rank lower in Resveratrol because of a drier California climate....according to the article I read.

 

Please discuss the grape names, which are held in the highest regard and what region of France are they grown.

Thank you for your generosity!  :) 


~~ Dear Lady Di ~~

 

 

Thanks for your most kind words.  The truth is, I have learned an enormous amount from You on various informative topics that you've covered on this site.

 

 

I appreciate the Terrific Map provided along with some great questions, so here goes :

 

 

1 )  The Basics... Grapes.  In France viticulture is almost akin to a religion.  Specific varietals are only allowed in certain regions deemed suitable for them and governed by the  A O C ,  ( Appellation Origine Controlée ).  The A O C  also monitors quality control in the finished product before a label is allowed to claim its Status.  This ensures you are getting a Quality Wine and you may want to avoid those without the A O C approval on the label.

 

 

2 )  Resveratrol in Wine.  Your findings regarding this are true to some extent.  It actually belongs to a class of compounds called  " stilbenes " .  Grapes naturally produce resveratrol in response to actions such as fungal attack, where its accumulation may reduce or stop the infection.  Wines produced in cooler regions, such as Burgandy with greater disease pressure, tend to have higher levels of resveratrol.  Wine-making procedures also impact their levels.  Reds have a higher content because stilbenes form in the grape skins and maceration to extract color produce higher levels of these compounds in the finished Wine.

 

 

3 )  Grape Names  / Varietals and their Regions :   Traditionally French Wine Labels focus on Regions and Producers more,  than in grape names since most European consumers seem to be familiar as to the varietals they produce. However, I will gladly list these for you, focusing on those most likely to be found as exports.  Simpler to do this by Regions so we can follow on the map to learn of the principal varietals grown there.

 

 

Alsace  :  Pinot Noir, Riesling, Chardonnay, Gewurztraminer.

 

Bordeaux  :  Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Malbec, Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc

 

Bourgogne a.k.a. Burgandy  : Pinot Noir, Gamay, Chardonnay.

 

Chablis  :  Chardonnay at tis best !.. Caution... semi-generic use of the word " Chablis " in wines produced in the U S  is Not the Real thing but Marketing Hype, which I'm against in order to Protect You The Consumer.

 

Champagne  :  Pinot Noir,  Pinot Meunier, Chardonnay.  A Specific Region my friends and another pet pieve when I see a winery labelling a generic sparkler as " California Champagne " !.  Beyond an oxy-moron...it's a rip off.

 

Languedoc - Rousillon :  Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah, Mouvédre, Carignan, Maccabeu.

 

Loire & Central :  Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Gamay.

 

Provence :  Carignan, Cinsault, Grenache, Mouvédre.

 

Rhone :  Syrah, Grenache, Viognier...

 

Cognac :  Ugni Blanc, Colombard.. situated in the heart of Poitou Charentes on the map.

 

 

Hope this sheds some light and I will gladly expand on anything specific.  Also willing to help anyone get established, be it from scratch or any facet thereof.  It is my Passion to do so.

 

 

To Your Health,

 

~~ S L ~~

 

 



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