#1 Dating Site for Successful Singles and Admirers
Millionaire Blogs > Worldmind's blogs > BoDyLaNgUaGe
BoDyLaNgUaGe Sort by:
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:55

Plausible facts...

  • Our body can deliver 70,000 different signals nonverbally.
  • Our face has approximately 250,000 different facial expressions.
  • We have more than 5,000 different moves of hands as per nonverbal language.
  • We have more than 1,000 ways or styles of standing and sitting.

Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
Dakota35
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 1214
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:40

When a woman crosses her legs toward you, it could mean she is interested in you.  When she crosses her legs away it could mean she is not.  A person's nose will actually get larger when they are lying...but probably is to small to tell.  No gesture definitely tells what is in the mind of the gesturer (is that even a word?).  Also, if one knows each of these gestures and knows a person is reading them, then why wouldn't they make false gestures or avoid making them.  This blog take me back to college...my psy teacher always sounded like she was about to cry when she talked...it was weird as I was expecting her to burst out in tears at any moment, but she never did.  LOL   She carried a huge bottle of pepper spray on her key chain along with some other weapons.  I was more interested in what her problems were than what she was teaching.  LOL



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:37

...


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:37

...


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:36

...


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:32

When the index finger points vertically up the cheek and the thumb supports the chin, the listener is having negative or critical thoughts about the speaker or his subject. Often the index finger may rub or pull at the eye as the negative thoughts continue.

 

The next time you have the opportunity to present an idea to a group of people, watch them carefully as you give your idea and you will notice something fascinating. Most, if not all the members of your audience will bring one hand up to their faces and begin to use evaluation gestures. As you come to the conclusion of your presentation and ask for the group to give opinions or suggestions about the idea, the evaluation gestures will cease. One hand will move to the chin and begin a chin-stroking gesture.

 

This chin-stroking gesture is the signal that the listener is making a decision. When you have asked the listeners for a decision and their gestures have changed from evaluation to decision-making.

 


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:29

Pain in Neck Gesture - A person who uses this when lying usually avoids your gaze and looks down. This gesture is also used as a signal of frustration or anger and, when this is the case, the hand slaps the back of the neck first and then begins to rub the neck.

Forgetfulness Gesture - The slapping of the head communicates forgetfulness, the person signals how he feels about you or the situation by the position used when he slaps his hand on his head, either the forehead or the neck. If he slaps his forehead he signals that he is not intimidated by your having mentioned his forgetfulness, but when he slaps the back of his neck. He non-verbally tells you that you are literally a ‘pain-in-the-neck’ for pointing out his error.


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:22

The Collar Pull - when a person is feeling angry or frustrated or sweating and needs to pull the collar away from his neck in an attempt to let the cool air circulate around it. When you see someone use this gesture, a question like, "Would you repeat that, please?" or, "Could you clarify that point, please?" can cause the would-be deceiver to give the game away. 

 

Fingers in the Mouth - Morris's explanation of this gesture is that the fingers are placed in the mouth when a person is under pressure. Whereas most hand-to-mouth gestures involve lying or deception, the fingers-in-mouth gesture is an outward manifestation of an inner need for reassurance.


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
Dakota35
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 1214
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:20

Quoting worldmind:

The mouth guard is one of the few adult gestures that is as obvious as a child's. The hand covers the mouth and the thumb is pressed against the cheek as the brain sub-consciously instructs it to try and suppress the deceitful words that are being said. Sometimes this gesture may only be several fingers over the mouth or even a closed fist, but its meaning remains the same. Many people try to disguise the mouth guard gesture by giving a fake cough.If the person who is speaking uses this gesture, it indicates that he is telling a lie. If, however, he covers his mouth while you are speaking, it indicates that he feels you are lying!


I total disagree with this one.  As I've caught myself doing this and by all means not lying.  In fact I was doing it while reading this.  Not all is what it seems.



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:15

Boredom Gesture - When the listener begins to use his hand to support his head, it is a signal that boredom has set in and his supporting hand is an attempt to hold his head up to stop himself from falling asleep. Extreme boredom and lack of interest are shown when the head is fully supported by the hand.

 

Interested Gesture - Interested gesture is shown by a closed hand resting on the cheek, often with the index finger pointing upwards. Should the person begin to lose interest but wish to appear interested, for courtesy’s sake, the position will alter slightly so that the heel of the palm supports the head.

 

Genuine interest is shown when the hand is on the cheek, not used as a head support.

 


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:11

The Ear Rub - This is, in effect, an attempt by the listener to 'hear no evil' in trying to block the words by putting the hand around or over the ear. This is the sophisticated adult version of the handsover-both-ears gesture used by the young child who wants to block out his parent's reprimands. Other variations of the ear rub gesture include rubbing the back of the ear, the finger drill (where the fingertip is screwed back and forth inside the ear), pulling at the earlobe or bending the entire ear forward to cover the earhole. This last gesture is a signal that the person has heard enough or may want to speak.

The Neck Scratch - In this case, the index finger of the writing hand scratches below the earlobe, or may even scratch the side of the neck. Our observation of this gesture, reveals an interesting point. The person scratches about five times. Rarely is the number of scratches less than five and seldom more than five. This gesture is a signal of doubt or uncertainty and is characteristic of the person who says, "I'm not sure I agree." It is very noticeable when the verbal language contradicts it, for example, when the person says something like, "I can understand how you feel."


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:10

 

The Nose Touch - In essence, the nose touch gesture is a sophisticated, disguised version of the mouth guard gesture. It may consist of several light rubs below the nose or it may be one quick, almost imperceptible touch. Like the mouth guard gesture, it can be used both by the speaker to disguise his own deceit and by the listener who doubts the speaker’s words.

The Eye Rub - 'See no evil' says the wise monkey, and this gesture is the brain's attempt to block out the deceit, doubt or lie that it sees or to avoid having to look at the face of the person to whom he is telling the lie. Men usually rub their eyes vigorously and if the lie is a big one they will often look away, normally towards the floor. Women use a small, gentle rubbing motion just below the eye, either because they have been brought up to avoid making robust gestures, or to avoid smudging make-up. They also avoid a listener’s gaze by looking at the ceiling.


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 13:08

The mouth guard is one of the few adult gestures that is as obvious as a child's. The hand covers the mouth and the thumb is pressed against the cheek as the brain sub-consciously instructs it to try and suppress the deceitful words that are being said. Sometimes this gesture may only be several fingers over the mouth or even a closed fist, but its meaning remains the same. Many people try to disguise the mouth guard gesture by giving a fake cough.If the person who is speaking uses this gesture, it indicates that he is telling a lie. If, however, he covers his mouth while you are speaking, it indicates that he feels you are lying!


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 12:49

Introduced by Edward T Hall in 1966, proxemics is the study of measurable distances between people as they interact with one another. The distance between people in a social situation often discloses information about the type of relationship between the people involved. Proximity may also reveal the type of social setting taking place.


  1. Intimate range ranges from touching to about 18 inches (46 cm) apart, and is reserved for lovers, children, as well as close family members and friends, and also pet animals.
  2. Personal distance begins about an arm's length away; starting around 18 inches (46 cm) from the person and ending about 4 feet (122 cm) away. This space is used in conversations with friends, to chat with associates, and in group discussions.
  3. Social distance ranges from 4 to 8 feet (1.2 m - 2.4 m) away from the person and is reserved for strangers, newly formed groups, and new acquaintances.
  4. Public distance includes anything more than 8 feet (2.4 m) away, and is used for speeches, lectures, and theater. Public distance is essentially that range reserved for larger audiences.

Proximity range varies with culture.

Diagram of Edwars T Halls personal reaction bubbles (1966), showing radius  in feet


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
worldmind
Available only
to logged in members

total posts: 702
Posted on Sat, Jan 12, 2013 12:44

 

Scientific research on nonverbal communication and behavior began with the 1872 publication of Charles Darwin's The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals.

Since that time, there has been an abundance of research on the types, effects and expressions of unspoken communication and behavior. While these signals are often so subtle that we are not consciously aware of them, research has identified several different types of nonverbal communication.

In many cases, we communicate information in nonverbal ways using groups of behaviors. For example, we might combine a frown with crossed arms and unblinking eye gaze to indicate disapproval.

Facial Expression

Facial expressions are responsible for a huge proportion of nonverbal communication. Consider how much information can be conveyed with a smile or a frown. While nonverbal communication and behavior can vary dramatically between cultures, the facial expressions for happiness, sadness, anger and fear are similar throughout the world.

Gestures

Deliberate movements and signals are an important way to communicate meaning without words. Common gestures include waving, pointing, and using fingers to indicate numeric amounts. Other gestures are arbitrary and related to culture.

Paralinguistics

Paralinguistics refers to vocal communication that is separate from actual language. This includes factors such as tone of voice, loudness, inflection and pitch. Consider the powerful effect that tone of voice can have on the meaning of a sentence. When said in a strong tone of voice, listeners might interpret approval and enthusiasm. The same words said in a hesitant tone of voice might convey disapproval and a lack of interest.

Body Language and Posture

Posture and movement can also convey a great deal on information. Research on body language has grown significantly since the 1970's, but popular media have focused on the over-interpretation of defensive postures, arm-crossing, and leg-crossing, especially after the publication of Julius Fast's book Body Language. While these nonverbal behaviors can indicate feelings and attitudes, research suggests that body language is far more subtle and less definitive that previously believed.

Proxemics

People often refer to their need for "personal space," which is also an important type of nonverbal communication. The amount of distance we need and the amount of space we perceive as belonging to us is influenced by a number of factors including social norms, situational factors, personality characteristics and level of familiarity. For example, the amount of personal space needed when having a casual conversation with another person usually varies between 18 inches to four feet. On the other hand, the personal distance needed when speaking to a crowd of people is around 10 to 12 feet.

Eye Gaze

Looking, staring and blinking can also be important nonverbal behaviors. When people encounter people or things that they like, the rate of blinking increases and pupils dilate. Looking at another person can indicate a range of emotions, including hostility, interest and attraction.

Haptics

Communicating through touch is another important nonverbal behavior. There has been a substantial amount of research on the importance of touch in infancy and early childhood. "Harry Harlows classic monkey study" demonstrated how the deprivation of touch and contact impedes development. Baby monkeys raised by wire mothers experienced permanent deficits in behavior and social interaction. Touch can be used to communicate affection, familiarity, sympathy and other emotions.

Appearance

Our choice of color, clothing, hairstyles and other factors affecting appearance are also considered a means of nonverbal communication. Research on color psychology has demonstrated that different colors can evoke different moods. Appearance can also alter physiological reactions, judgments and interpretations. Just think of all the subtle judgements you quickly make about someone based on his or her appearance. These first impressions are important, which is why experts suggest that job seekers dress appropriately for interviews with potential employers.


Available only
to logged in members

by Worldmind

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    0 up Bookmark and Share
Follow - Email me when people comment