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BeWell
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Posted on Thu, Jun 07, 2012 06:39

Quoting Voyager54:

~Aunt BE~...I know all about Beatle history. Saw the book although have not read it. Have read many others. Used to hang around Strawberry Fields in Central Park, look upon the Dakota and wished things could have been different that cold night on December 8 of 1980.

 

It's nice to see that Yoko looks great for her age. She was ten years older than John. And the boys both seem to be doing well.

I always wanted to pattern my family life after John...I respected who he was as a man. Albeit, he did go off on a couple of  benders, but so don't we all. And he did those things in his 20's and 30's and here I am now in my late 50's and I STILL want to go out once in a while and cut loose.

 

Anyway, nice to see somebody interested in one of the most interesting artists of the 20th century.



Yes, John Lennon was one of the most interesting. He was quite deep and constantly trying to find himself and make sense of the world. He was all about love and responsibility to his family once he settled down.

 

 Although there was a lot of competition between Lennon and McCartney, both were amazing, just different, and spectacular when they collaborated.

 

I never saw the four together, but did have the chance to see George Harrison in concert with Ravi Shankar. It was truly an experience!

 

I highly recommend the book. It is well written, and very well researched. Finally finished all 822 pages.



BeWell and wishing you only the best ! ..................;-D

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Curious2078
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Posted on Wed, Jun 06, 2012 20:15

Quoting BeWell:

Curious.... Maybe I'll skip that one. ;-D


Why, pray tell?  Why skip this one?

 

 

 

Unless, of course you've read other John Barth novels.

 

 

 

ROFLMAO

 

P.S.:  Still reading it.  It "DO" go on forever.  And carrying around a dictionary to elucidate mid-sentence commentary every few paragraphs is a chore indeed.



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BeWell
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Posted on Sun, Jun 03, 2012 13:44

Thanks, rmac,

I do love to study how people think, and learn. It's fascinating to me, and also helps me in my marketing work and relationships. I will also try to find, Stumbling On Happiness, as well as Thinking Fast and Slow. I kind of figured you would tell me I was going to still have to play a lot more chess to get better. I guess there's no magic book or other easy way around it, unless one is either a prodigy or have the neuro-transmitters established in their brain from sports or other forms of strategic or tactical thinking.

Thank you kindly for the recommendations............... BeWell

 

 

 



BeWell and wishing you only the best ! ..................;-D

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rmac22
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Posted on Sat, Jun 02, 2012 10:24

Quoting BeWell:

Curious.... Maybe I'll skip that one. ;-D



BeWelll:  Sometimes titles can really put one off and cause one to miss a great book.  The book Curious mentions is perhaps one of them.  I have not read it.  I have looked into others with titles that should have put me off, but the very oddness of the title pricked my curiosity.  One I would recommend in that Category is “Stumbling On Happiness,” not at all what you expect and another great book on how people think.  If you are fascinated on what and how people think – read it. 

 

rmac

 



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rmac22
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Posted on Sat, Jun 02, 2012 06:49

BeWell::  The whole thrust of the book is about our quick "instinctive" thinking and our slower critical thinking.  Chess is only one example.  The book is not about chess. 

 

How the book relates to chess, is that the great masters have played so much chess that they see the whole board and all the pieces as a pattern and they recognize the patterns and know the moves that work for each. 

 

So, from this book you would know that you need to play a lot of chess.  What has happened with the great masters is that the hard critical thinking necessary for most of us at each move has been shifted over into the quick thinking area, they see the pattern and know what to do.  They do not need to think, “If I do this my opponent will do that and then….”

 

The book can make you smarter though in all sorts of ways.  I recommend it.  The introduction nearly put me off though.  It says something like “his goal is to improve the quality of water cooler conversations.”  I thought as I read that, “who care about the quality of …”  Fortunately, I read on.    

 

rmac

 



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BeWell
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Posted on Fri, Jun 01, 2012 11:21

Quoting MissMonteCarlo:

I do like to read but at the moment it’s all academic reading on autistic spectrum disorders. Very interesting and insightful though.

I did start personal reading last year. Nelson Mandela’s Long Walk to Freedom but still have another 2/3 of the book to read.

 

Sarah :-)



Miss Monte Carlo,

That autistic disorder is certainly controversial. If it is a subject related to your work or life, it's important to keep up with all the new info on it.

I have a 2nd cousin who is autistic. He was a perfectly normal toddler one day, the next day he got an immunization shot and the day after that he left this conscious world to join a world deep within his mind.

Even though researchers say there is no link, how can thousands and thousands of children have a similar story and it not be caused from those shots that contain a form of mercury? Any way, it is good you are keeping up with it.

Mandela is a fascinating person and such a lightbeam of love and forgiveness. Hope you get a chance to finish the book................... BeWell



BeWell and wishing you only the best ! ..................;-D

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BeWell
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Posted on Fri, Jun 01, 2012 11:07

Quoting rmac22:

I am off and on reading "Thinking Fast and Slow."  It will definitely make you smarter about how we think.  It also explains some commonly misunderstood things such as how the great chess masters can do what they do. 

 

rmac

 



rmac,

I think I'll try to find Thinking Fast and Slow.

Sounds like it may be similar to the last book I read, The Art of Learning: A Journey in the Pursuit of Excellence by Josh Waitzkin, a Youth National Chess Champion. Through his life story, he teaches zen techniques for better concentration, and presents it from his experiences in chess and martial arts.

There was also a movie about Josh's life called, Searching for Bobby Fischer which I recently checked out at the library. Very interesting flick, if you like chess. He is kind of a child prodigy and learned the game from thugs and con-artists on the streets of New York. Josh is in his 30s now.

I could sure use more ideas about how to better my game. ;-D



BeWell and wishing you only the best ! ..................;-D

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BeWell
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Posted on Fri, Jun 01, 2012 10:51

Curious.... Maybe I'll skip that one. ;-D



BeWell and wishing you only the best ! ..................;-D

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Curious2078
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Posted on Thu, May 31, 2012 21:02

John Barth's "Giles Goat Boy."

 

What have I learned so far?

 

I have no idea.  If you've read it, you know full well why that's my answer to what have I learned so far.



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rmac22
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Posted on Thu, May 31, 2012 07:21

I am off and on reading "Thinking Fast and Slow."  It will definitely make you smarter about how we think.  It also explains some commonly misunderstood things such as how the great chess masters can do what they do. 

 

rmac

 



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MissMonteCarlo
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Posted on Thu, May 31, 2012 01:50

I do like to read but at the moment it’s all academic reading on autistic spectrum disorders. Very interesting and insightful though.

I did start personal reading last year. Nelson Mandela’s Long Walk to Freedom but still have another 2/3 of the book to read.

 

Sarah :-)



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