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migliore Recommended
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Posted on Wed, Oct 13, 2010 19:43

Often when after giving another member of the military the greeting of the day, I'll say, "Are we having fun yet?"  Most will answer with reasonable sincerity, "Always."  To which I add, "If you're having fun, getting paid and accruing gummint benefits, that's a win-win-win.  And two out of three is good too."  

 

Just a reminder that due to our mission and service we do what we do fun or not.  Some people view military life as one comprised of arbitary rules and unnecessary discipline.  Others reckon that our mission calls for focus and precision.  There are rules of courtesy members of the military are required to observe.  We even have "mandatory fun" wherein soldiers are ordered to participate in wholesome, "fun" activities.  Sound like fun? 

 

What does this have to do with the men and women of Annapolis and my barracks at Ft. Huachuca?   Persons training at both locations live in accord with certain rules that support an appropriate level of discipline so we can accomplish our mission.  When I stepped out in the hallway of my barracks at Ft. Huachuca in response to the concerns expressed by one of the female soldiers in residence there, tradition and rank empowered me to apply those rules and enforce standards necessary for us to have a healthy living environment. 

 

Every soldier -- including officers -- knows the importance of a lawful order to observe established rules of conduct.  As I went through the barracks during my initial inspection there was alot that was below standards.  I also found soldiers out on the fire escapes using them as balconies as they drank liquor and enjoyed the temperate Arizona winter weather.  When I stepped out there with them my words were simply spoken, "Get on your feet and show me your ID tags and ID Card." 

 

There were some older males out there socializing much younger soldiers who refused and told me they were officers.  "Sir," I said to the apparent ranking officer, "these are my barracks and only officers in our chain of command are authorized to be here, otherwise you're fraternizing.  With all due respect, Sir," I added, "either you show me your ID tags and ID card or you need to leave immediately."  They left. 

 

Later they went to my chain of command and accused me of being disrespectful.  My superiors in some ways would rather have had me do nothing, because my actions had created fallout for them and may have called them into account to enforce essential standards.  However, what could they say to the rationale I presented, "Sir," I explained to my company commander, "they were in civilian clothers and they refused to show me identification so who they were was a mystery to me.  As officers they know that for them to engage in fraternization with junior enlisted soldiers -- particularly female junior enlisted  -- is ill-advised." 

 

May sound arbitrary, ominous and heavy handed to many for the military to continue to observe the seemingly arcane rule which discourages officers and enlisted from mixing socially.  That's a matter worth examining, which we will do in my next post which will take a look at whether the non-fraternization policy supports or prevents healthy living and positive growth.



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billzeke
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Posted on Sun, Oct 17, 2010 23:41

John and Andy. Don't forget I live in Tucson, so I keep up with this stuff. Living here, it would be hard not to. I wanted Andy's opinion because of his familiarity with Ft. Hauchuca. I got Mr. Woodward's account from a good friend of mine, a retired Air Force Colonel, who was also a friend of Robert Krentz; the AZ. rancher who was recently murdered on his own property. Regarding warning signs. There are signs posted in the United States warning Americans not to enter certain areas because of the danger from Mexican drug and human smugglers. I repeat. SIGNS POSTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. It's a disgrace...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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migliore Recommended
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Posted on Thu, Oct 14, 2010 14:25

Bill,

 

Roger your concern also expressed by Mr. Woodward as regards controlling the border and the threat posed by drug-related violence.  The media in its collective wisdom seizes on any scrap of discouraging news from Iraq or Afghanistan seemingly to spread discouragement and defeatism, yet the violence just south of our border is barely on the public's radar screen.

 

What has been going on in Mexico is truely gruesome.  Mass graves from execution-style killings are discovered constantly.  The violence appears endless and the Mexican Federal Army has been deployed because in many cases local law enforcement authorities are owned and influenced by the drug cartels.  One wonders the extent of corruption in the Federal Army as well.

 

The cartels clearly seem interested in extending the mayhem north of the boarder.  Apparently there are home invasions and kidnappings that victimize American citizens.  I've heard reports of over-extended law enforcement agencies in the US opting to warn citizens they are entering a zone where the rule of law had been degraded.

 

Easy for certain spokespersons to lecture and moralize from far away.  Quite different when your person and property is at risk.  My view is that debates over political philosophy are inappropriate in this situation.  The discussion needs to be about practical techniques for preserving the rule of law on American soil and assisting Mexican authorities to establish such on their side of the border.

 

Andy



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migliore Recommended
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Posted on Thu, Oct 14, 2010 14:08

John,
Your support and interest is appreciated.  Roger your comments about Miss Sophia.  My view is that if she ever ran for office she would put some people on notice that the time for positive change has arrived.

 

As regards command authority I think you would agree its all about what an outstanding gentleman once said, "The leader is servant of all."

 

Sei beato,
Andy



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migliore Recommended
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Posted on Thu, Oct 14, 2010 13:58

Grüsse Sophia,

 

 

 

Am I noticing an expression of strong opinion as regards the need for discipline and appropriate behavior?  Could be wrong, however, my training leads me to initially assess that you have a strong drive for excellence and precision. 

 

Command authority is important in the military and unless it is exercised responsibly, judiciously and with the best interest of all in mind, our military could be rendered ineffective from within.  Fortunately we have many outstanding members of the military, male and female, officer and enlisted. 

 

 Falling standards can be a little like low oil levels in a car -- the whole engine can seize and bring foward progress to a grinding halt.



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attaboy127
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Posted on Thu, Oct 14, 2010 13:16

Thank you M for your continuation of your story.   Waiting for the next part.    Thank you for handling your situation as well as you did.      Having had CM Authority in my day, it is good to read of such a reasoned approach to a situation that could have turned out a lot differently!

Sophia you are very right in your writings.   Than you for being such a good citizen.    It is a pleasure knowing you in the blogs.

And Bill, where in the world did you get mr. Woodard's account?     Thanks for the ammo!

God bless everyone,

John



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billzeke
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Posted on Wed, Oct 13, 2010 20:20

Hey Migliore. Would you please comment on the following...

 

Report from Cochise County, Arizona
>   By T.J. Woodard
>
>   Being an avid AT reader, and living on the Arizona border in Cochise
County, I thought I would provide those who wish to be informed some insight
into the truth about the state of the U.S.-Mexican border -- at least in
this part of the state.
>
>
>   I moved to Cochise County after retiring from the Army in 2008 to take a
position working at Fort Huachuca (pronounced "wa-choo-ka," an Apache word
meaning "place of thunder" and referring to the time after the summer
monsoon season). Having lived here in 1991 for eight months while attending
an Army school, I soon realized that the place had changed considerably in
the eighteen years of my absence.
>
>   
>
>   The first thing I noticed was how many border patrol vehicles were on
the roads in the city of Sierra Vista. The Border Patrol has a large station
near here in the city of Naco. There are far more Border Patrol vehicles in
the area than SV police cars. They come in many forms -- trucks for off-road
work, trailers carrying all-terrain vehicles, pickups with capacity for
carrying large numbers of people once apprehended, and even a staff car for
the area chaplain. The Border Patrol presence has grown substantially, so
one would think the border area was nice and safe.
>
>   
>
>   Not so. Within a short time after arriving in southern Arizona while on
my way to work, I noticed eight illegal immigrants on the side of the road.
Fortunately, they were in the custody of capable and attentive Border Patrol
agents. Unfortunately, they were less than a hundred feet from my daughter's
bus stop. She gets personal service to school now, as the school district
refuses to enter the gated community in which we live. There is a nice wash,
a valley into which the rainwater drains during the monsoons, which provides
a nice route for the illegals to follow into the city, and therefore into
their locations for pickup by the vehicles that will get them farther north.

>
>   
>
>   Later, after I attended a movie on a Friday night, a car passed by me in
the next lane going nearly a hundred miles an hour. It took a few seconds
before I saw the police behind -- way behind -- with lights and sirens,
trying to catch up. Surprise, surprise -- the next morning's paper discussed
a Mexican drug runner being caught by County Sheriff's Deputies. On several
occasions, the Border Patrol's helicopter has flown low and slow over the
neighborhood, rattling windows and shining its spotlight in our backyard.
When this happens, I strap on my pistol, grab a flashlight, and look and
listen. Fortunately, I haven't found anybody within a hundred yards of the
house -- yet.
>
>   
>
>   Working on a U.S. Army fort, one would think we were fairly secure from
these threats. Just not true. Reading the Fort Huachuca newspaper one
morning, I noticed an interesting part of the "community" page. It asked for
volunteers to assist in cleaning up "dumps" on posts where the illegals
would drop their supplies used to cross the border and change clothing. They
do this in order to blend in and not look like they just spent a day or two
crossing the border in the dust and heat of southern Arizona. The most
frightening part of this is that Fort Huachuca is the U.S. Army Intelligence
Center, where the Army trains its intelligence soldiers -- analysts,
interrogators, radio intercept specialists, and counterintelligence agents
-- for operations overseas. If we can't secure the fort we use to train our
intelligence soldiers, how can we secure anything else?
>
>   
>
>   Much has been discussed about the new law in Arizona making it unlawful
to be in Arizona in violation of federal immigration statutes. However, much
less has been discussed about the shooting of rancher Robert Krentz. Robert
was killed on his ranch on March 28, 2010. His ranch, on which the family
began grazing cattle in 1907 (Arizona became a state in 1912), is a large,
35,000-acre area in remote Cochise County. It is so remote that the original
Cochise, an Apache leader, used the mountainous terrain near it to hide from
the U.S. Cavalry in the early 1870s. But much less is being said about the
eight illegal immigrants and their load of 280 pounds of marijuana seized
the day before Krentz was killed. 
>
>   
>
>   So Arizona should be boycotted because its people would like to keep it
safe? Somebody please explain the logic of that for me. It doesn't take a
bullet from a drug runner's gun to make those of us down here near the
border understand that this is drug-related violence -- and Rob's death
proves it.
>
>   
>
>   It also doesn't take much more reading to see that the drug dealers are
a huge problem with far-reaching capabilities. On April 27, 2010, a large
drug bust took place here in Cochise County. Among those arrested was
Angelica Marie Borquez, the secretary for the Drug Enforcement Division of
the Cochise County Attorney office. Allegedly, Ms. Borquez was tipping off
the drug runners to counter drug operations conducted by the county. She was
so bold that she used the phone in the County Attorney's office to make some
of her calls. 
>
>   
>
>   This isn't a blatant effort by drug cartels to obtain control here in
America?
>
>   
>
>   Many have already called Arizona residents racists. They are concerned
that police will profile Hispanics and disproportionally harass them. But we
understand something others in Washington, D.C. and San Francisco don't seem
to remember -- we border Mexico. The fact is that most illegal immigrants
coming across the border here are, well, Mexicans. Those of us down here
facing the danger every day really don't care what some Hollywood actor has
to say about the issue. Nor do we care about what the Colombian government
or the Latino music community thinks of it. We just want to stay safe.
>
>   
>
>   This is not about race; it's about facts. Use a few of these facts the
next time somebody wants to engage you in discussion about the border. Tell
him you learned these things from somebody who can see Mexico from his front
porch.
>
>   
>
>   T.J. Woodard is a retired Army officer who lives less than ten miles
from the Mexican border. He carries a pistol even in his own house in order
to be prepared to defend his family whenever necessary.
>
>   
>
>   
>
>   Ted



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