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wwww12345
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Posted on Sun, Oct 03, 2010 15:46

What if the hokey pokey really is what it's all about? That's all I can come up with today. Have you had any revelations lately? What do you think it's all about?


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Curious2078
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Posted on Sat, Oct 09, 2010 20:51

Quoting wwww12345:

What if the hokey pokey really is what it's all about? That's all I can come up with today. Have you had any revelations lately? What do you think it's all about? <


What's it all about?

 

Food, shelter, clothing---and grand entertainment.  Love should be in there somewhere, but love is the most difficult need to find, and in truth,love is not so much of a need as the other four.  Unless you're between the ages of one second old and roughly 15 years of age. 

 

Unless, of course, you consider happiness a basic need.   If you do, that changes everything, doesn't it? 



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wwww12345
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Posted on Tue, Oct 05, 2010 23:11

You guys just stick with me. We will solve the worlds problems right here on the net. I am glad I am finally getting a little respect for my wisdom and knowledge, at least from Bill. I was feeling like Rodney Dangerfield for the last few months. lol


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wwww12345
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Posted on Tue, Oct 05, 2010 08:36

So you folks thought I asked a trivia question. huh. Well, live and learn. from wikipedia. Origins and meaning According to one account,[1] in 1940, during the Blitz in London, a Canadian officer suggested to Al Tabor, a British bandleader of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s that he write a party song with actions similar to "Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree". The inspiration for the song's title, "The Hokey Pokey", that resulted, came from an ice cream vendor whom Al had heard as a boy, calling out "Hokey pokey penny a lump. Have a lick make you jump". He changed the name to "The Hokey Cokey" at the suggestion of the officer who said that 'hokey cokey', in Canada, meant 'crazy' and would sound better. A well known lyricist/songwriter/music publisher of the time, Jimmy Kennedy, reneged on a financial agreement to promote and publish it, and finally Al settled out of court, giving up all rights to the number. There had been many theories and conjectures about the meaning of the words "Hokey Pokey", and of their origin. Some scholars[citation needed] attributed the origin to the Shaker song Hinkum-Booby which had similar lyrics and was published in Edward Deming Andrews' A gift to be simple in 1960: (p. 42) . " A song rendered ("with appropriate gestures") by two Canterbury sisters while on a visit to Bridgewater, N.H. in 1857 starts thus: I put my right hand in, I put my right hand out, In out, in out. shake it all about. As the song continues, the "left hand" is put in, then the "right foot," then the "left foot," then "my whole head." ...Newell gave it the title, "Right Elbow In," and said that is was danced " deliberately and decorously...with slow rhythmical motion." Before the invention of ice cream cones, ice cream was often sold wrapped in waxed paper and known as a hokey-pokey (possibly a corruption of the Italian ecco un poco - "here is a little")[2] An Italian ice cream street vendor was called a hokey-pokey man. Other scholars[citation needed] found similar dances and lyrics dating back to the 17th century. A very similar dance is cited in Robert Chambers' Popular Rhymes of Scotland from 1826. The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that the phrase "hokey cokey" ultimately comes from "hocus pocus", the traditional magician's incantation. However, the dictionary discounts suggestions that "hocus pocus" in its turn derives from a distortion of hoc est enim corpus meum ("this is my body" - the Latin words of consecration of the host at Eucharist, the point, at which according to traditional Catholic practice, transubstantiation takes place - mocked by Puritan and others as a form of "magic words"), noting that "The notion that hocus pocus was a parody of the Latin words used in the Eucharist, rests merely on a conjecture thrown out by Tillotson". The conjecture put forward by Tillotson reads "In all probability those common juggling words of hocus pocus are nothing else but a corruption of hoc est corpus, by way of ridiculous imitation of the priests of the Church of Rome in their trick of Transubstantiation". The Anglican Canon Matthew Damon, Provost of Wakefield Cathedral, West Yorkshire, has claimed that the dance as well comes from the Catholic Latin mass.[3] The priest would perform his movements with his back to the congregation, who could not hear well the words, nor understand the Latin, nor clearly see his movements. This theory led Scottish politician Michael Matheson in 2008 to urge police action "against individuals who use it to taunt Catholics.” This claim by Matheson was deemed ridiculous by fans from both sides of the Old Firm (the Glasgow football teams Celtic and Rangers) and calls were put out on fans' forums for both sides to join together to sing the song on 27 December 2008 at Ibrox.[4] Close relatives of the song's original publisher and of the song's author have publicly stated their recollections of its origin and its meaning. These accounts differ. In January 2009, the son of Jimmy Kennedy stated that the song which his father originally published as Cokey Cokey originated in 1942 from an experience his father had with Canadian soldiers stationed at a London nightclub. Jimmy Kennedy Jr. quoted his father's writing: "They were having a hilarious time, singing and playing games, one of which they said was a Canadian children's game called The Cokey Cokey. I thought to myself, wouldn't that be fun as a dance to cheer people up! So when I got back to my hotel, I wrote a chorus based on the feet and hand movements the Canadians had used, with a few adaptations. A few days later, I wrote additional lyrics to it but kept the title, Cokey Cokey, and, as everybody knows, it became a big hit." According to Kennedy Jr., his father told him "the unusual title was to do with drugs [cocaine] taken by the miners in Canada to cheer themselves up in the harsh environment where they were prospecting."[5] Alternatively, the grandson of the song's author, Alan Balfour, stated in a letter to The Times published 11 January 2009, responding to the then-recent claims that the song was anti-Catholic: The idea that the Hokey Cokey song was inspired by any hocus pocus (hoc est enim corpus meum), is a lot of bigoted bunkum (News, December 21). The man who wrote the Hokey Cokey was my grandfather – Al Tabor, a well-known bandleader of the 1930s and 1940s, and neither a Latin scholar nor a bigot.[6] Alan Balfour has written a play about his grandfather’s life called The Hokey Cokey Man (scheduled as of January 2009 to start a five-week run at New End Theatre in London, UK, on 20 May 2009) and was interviewed at its announcement by The Times: "All of a sudden the song has become something to hammer people with when all it was something to create cheer and a better feeling for the population during the time of the war. "My grandfather would have thought this was totally absurd. It was never meant to be a dig at anybody, it was meant to inspire people to express themselves physically and celebrate living. It was to cheer everybody up not just Protestants or Jews or whoever. "This whole business with the Catholic church is silly. The song and the music for the song certainly didn’t come from hocus-pocus." Balfour said his grandfather told him he thought of the ice-cream sellers of his youth when he was looking for a cheery title for a throwaway ditty. "When he was a boy they used to come up and down the street shouting 'hokey pokey, penny a lump' to sell ice cream. The Canadian officer said to him why don't you change it to 'hokey cokey' because in Canada 'cokey' means 'crazy'."[6] [edit] Dance across the world [edit] Britain Known as the Hokey Cokey and Okey Cokey, the song and accompanying dance peaked in popularity as a music hall song and novelty dance in the mid-1940s in Britain and Ireland. There is a claim of authorship by the British/Irish songwriter Jimmy Kennedy, responsible for the lyrics to popular songs such as the wartime We're Going to Hang out the Washing on the Siegfried Line and the children's song Teddy Bears' Picnic. Sheet music copyrighted in 1942 and published by Campbell Connelly & Co Ltd, agents for Kennedy Music Co Ltd, styles the song as "the Cokey Cokey".[citation needed] The song was us


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billzeke
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Posted on Mon, Oct 04, 2010 02:21

That's really funny 5W's. It might even work. Whenever you get stressed: "Do the Hokey Pokey and turn yourself about." If only it were that easy. Maybe we could do the "Bunny Hop" to celebrate the finer things in life. LOL...


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Tinkerbelle
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Posted on Mon, Oct 04, 2010 01:54

lol if thats what its all about then we are all in trouble


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