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Les Miserables by Victor Hugo Sort by:
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Posted on Sun, Aug 17, 2008 09:55 AM

"Preface So long as there shall exist, by reason of law and custom, a social condemnation which, in the face of civilization, artificially creates hells on earth, and complicates a destiny that is divine, with human fatality; so long as the three problems of the age--the degradation of man by poverty, the ruin of woman by starvation, and the dwarfing of childhood by physical and spiritual night--are not solved; so long as, in certain regions, social asphyxia shall be possible; in other words, and from a yet more extended point of view, so long as ignorance and misery remain on earth, books like this cannot by useless. Hauteville House, 1862" Victor Hugo just because i absolutely love him.


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Posted on Wed, Aug 20, 2008 08:06 AM

wow! finally, someone who understands! i'm amazed and shocked at the same time... at first i didn't get it at all... it was crazy and creative... but after reading and rereading it... it made sense to me... but nicely put. i thought it was one of the most brilliant and creative thing a writer can do to their books. i mean every masterpiece has its own style but Victor just blew my mind. if only he was alive... all of our greatest.... the greatest within us are gone. actually... i haven't finish reading it... it made my blood boil in rage and it depresses me so i stopped three fourth of the way... i do this at times from books to books... sometimes it takes me years to come back to it... i think i wasn't strong enough to read it yet... or mature enough to let go.


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Posted on Tue, Aug 19, 2008 06:47 PM

Dear Avaredrose, Thanks for sharing this moving introduction. What did you think of the musical interpretation of the novel? I was actually quite impressed by Cameron McIntosh's ability to lighten the mood for public consuption while still providing a compelling story of the internal struggle of Javert (so aptly analogized in this opening) and the comparative lives of Eponine, Cozette, Jean Valjean and the rest of the characters.


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