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TRUTH ABOUT FARMERS AND RANCHERS Sort by:
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Posted on Sat, Apr 28, 2007 08:11

I am a 3rd generation farmer/racher. I have raised corn, soybeans, oats, hay, barley, and milo. I have dairyed, farrowed to finished hogs, raised feeder cattle, trained horses, and now currently I breed cows and raise baby calves. My fist experience farming was about 4 years old. I put on my dads cowboy boots, and went outside completely naked. I crawled up on the manure spreader and began throwing crap out, till mom caught me... My grandpa and dad are top farmers. Grandpa started farming at 17 when is dad died. He took over the family and the farm. I moved on one of our farms when I was 18 my senior year. It was fun I got to wake up from my own house and go to school. Man the parties I had.... I have been farming on my own since then. I started out farming by raising hogs with my dad. Then dairying and raising horse hay with my uncle. Things were a lot simpler back then.... Now I work a full time job in town and farm. I'm a certified tech for Vermeer, farm 400 acres, and have cow herd. I've been poor and I've been rich, just depends on the market and luck... Between Grandpa , dad, and me we farm about 1800 acres. We are not big farmers by anymeans. When it comes to animals and the land I know what I'm talking about. I do soil sampling, commercial pestiside application, and manure management. You have to be certified to do all these things. Today's farmer actually does a lot more for the land than they did 50 or 100 years ago. We have strict conservation practices we follow, and 10 times the knowlede we had back then. The ground is in better shape than it has ever been. There are a few big farmers that don't follow the rules and get caught. Those are the ones that put a bad image on the TV. But the vast majority take pride in the product we raise. If properly raised your food is safer and healthier than ever. Do you know it takes 320 to 350 dollars an acre to raise corn? That can be more depending on the rent you pay. A bag of seed corn cost up to $190. One bag does about 3 acres depending on seed count.It takes about $275 for soybeans. A bag of seed beans is about $30 and covers about an acre. Most people think farmers are rich because of the trucks and equipment we have. We are not rich, farmers are always cash poor, but we look good on paper. We handle large amounts of money, but hardly see it. Combines and tractors cost a 100000 to a quarter million depending on the size. All profit is invested. We are the only business people who gets what they tell us our crop is worth. Other business's get to set their price. Our world is governed by the Chicago board of trade. Our corn can be worth 1.89 to 3.50 a bushel. Corn back in the fifties was worth $2. It doesn't matter what our cost is. We can raise from 150 to 200 bu corn. Last year we had a drought and most of use raised 100 to 130 bu. It's easy to loose a lot of money out here. Someday people in this country will starve. There is only so much land and each year it gets to be less and less. The population grows and we try to raise more bushels to cover it. But if we have a major crop failure, it will get ugly. Right now there are 90 million projected acres of corn going to be planted. We need all of it at 157 bu to the acre to keep up with demand and have a slight surplus. The chances of that going to be tuff. Just think what would happen if we had a crop failure?? Just a little food for thought. In the spring and fall I get up at 6 and get in at 12 to 1 am. We work very hard these months. But we get a great lifestyle, watching crops and animals grow. We don't have to lock our houses or vehicles. Kids can go to school without metal detectors. And I can walk around outside naked if i want to..... So please next time you have to slow down for a farmer on the road, or sit down at the table for a meal. Say a prayer for a farmer. We are out here trying to make a difference in a world that sometimes doesn't realize what we have to do. We do care!!

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Posted on Sun, Apr 29, 2007 07:43

I'm not a organic farmer. I use Roundup, which has no residual effects on my crops. My hay was all organic though.


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bambidag
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Posted on Sat, Apr 28, 2007 22:21

Yes I seen that Geniek... he retracting his comment!!! C'mon Will put the tie on!!! LOL


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_HONEY
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Posted on Sat, Apr 28, 2007 18:09

Thank you Horsewhisperer, We need our American farmer to sustain this country so badly. It's the best and most healthful food we could eat. On the news tonight they said that we need to be careful about the foods we import from China as many of them have poisons in them similar to the ones in the dog food products. China and the U.S. need to start more inspection where there is none. So I trust food that comes from the American farmer before I'll buy imported food. It's always good.


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bambidag
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Posted on Sat, Apr 28, 2007 16:11

Horsewhisper that is quite a blog!! We all should be very grateful for the farmer, because without them there would be world chaos. So, thank you and you are appreciated. Ya know as a child I would visit my Aunt who lived upstate NY on a farm and she had chickens, cows, horses, etc. I do remember one day walking towards the barn where the cows stayed. It was quiet and then all of sudden here they come, running toward me.. I jumped the fence so fast.. which happen to be where the bull was. Needless to say, I was covered with mud from head to toe.. ugh!!!


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LatinPrincess4U
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Posted on Sat, Apr 28, 2007 14:57

My Sweet Rancher/Farmer Thank You for letting "Blogland" know who you are and how valuable you are not only for their everyday Life, but in my Life as well!! You are very "special" Mr. Randy and you know that and your heart is as big as the World!!, Ur KARI


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Posted on Sat, Apr 28, 2007 08:50

Amen. Farming, in my brother's words: it's the only business where you buy seed at retail, pay freight both ways and get paid wholesale for your crop. You know what you are talking about, but this further backs you up. With GPS, buyers know what crop yields before you probably do, so no farmer can negotiate pricing. Talk about being between a rock and a hard place. It behoves us all to buy US produced food products when possible to support our local and national farmers. Not every farm or ranch is owned by Monsanto, at least not yet. The family farm is a rich part of our history and deserves our full support. Once we have to rely on foreign imports to feed our nation... It's interesting to note that the FDA only inspects about 1% of food items imported to the US. Most of what they inspect ends up being rejected. There are countries where pesticides are not monitored and pesticides banned in the US are used. I've met quite a few people who are converting to organic production. The problem is finding the buyers. Not every producer can supply Whole Foods. I predict that changes are coming and rapidly, so it may be something for you to consider. You know what's best for your operation. If you want to support US products buy them. If you want more organic, buy it or ask for it at your supermarket. We, as consumers, create demand.


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