Member's Blog > Silverlion's blogs > All Your Wine Related Questions ?.....
All Your Wine Related Questions ?..... Sort by:
Author
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sat, Jun 22, 2013 19:59

~~ Dear Friends ~~

 

As a  Globally  Experienced  Wine-Maker, I will do my best to answer any and all Questions you may have regarding this topic, with pleasure.  This blog is intended to be inter-active and I welcome your input so we may all learn from it with courteous discussion.

 

Many First Dates  are " cemented " with a great Dinner & Fine Wine .....a good starting point.  Then the next episode.... What Wine shall we have for Brunch Dear ?....

 

Eventually it may shift to... Varietals...Alcohol Percentages...Regions...Vintages...Aromas... Volatile Acidity....  Info on Labels....Sulphites....Tannins.... Health Issues.... Marketing Hype....White Merlot.... California Champagne .... Fermentations .... Filtration ..... Corks  vs  Screw Tops .... Wine Glasses.... Tears  vs  Legs ...and the list goes on.... 

 

To Your Health....Cheers,

 

~~ S L ~~

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    2 Likes Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Wed, Sep 28, 2016 14:51

Quoting Maryclaire2000:

 

SL ,

 

The Question ...HOW DOES ONE FIND A QUALITY WINE , AT

AFFORDABLE PRICE ??

 

Yes I can , yes we can .. I drink once a year but I quite know where to buy a good stuff ..either I go to a wine Store or wine 

Section ..I can ask questions and seek better infos about wine.. Usually I have spent up to 10 Euro but I did too at 50 Euro.. In my opinion the Price is not a question in buying a good stuff ..There are some points and details to take into

considerations such as the taste , the dryness ( Tannin contents ), the Seal (official Test result ) , the availability ( top or flop ) , the Storage , the color , sugar rest , the bottle , cork or other cover and last but not the least , the durability ( Rw - 4 yrs , Rose a. white wine 2 yrs ) how long we can keep it ..

 

So SL , I hope Im doing it right ...Much to pay attention to but

its worth buying the right stuff ..

 



**  maryclaire2000  **

 

If that approach works for you,  as a once a year consumer,  it's fine. 

 

With everyday wine consumers,  it's a lot more involved than that.   It is the focus of my teachings in all the tasting sessions. 

 

Essentially,  how to judge and find a high quality wine,  within a reasonable budget,  via blind tastings. 

 

**  S L  **



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Tue, Sep 27, 2016 07:31

Quoting born1top:

Good evening Mr.SL my question is what does age have to do with wine, I'm not a wine drinker nor any beverage with alcohol, but in my younger days I did participate and I have many friends/ family members that do. And is a age wine better, and if so how many years of age is sufficient. 

 

Yours truly,  Mr. Born1top.

  Love & peace.



**  born1top  **

 

Nice question, for which I Thank you.  To make it easily understandable, I shall refrain from complex Oenology, as much as possible.

 

The primary benefit to age wines, is to soften the ' astringency ' , or mouth feel.  This puckering sensation comes from the grape skin tannins, which is inherent in all young Red Wines.  It is also the component that produces the intensity of color, again largely in Red Wines.

 

The level or amount of tannins, depend on several factors such as,  grape varietal, quality of a harvest,  wine making techniques, desired style of wine and so on.  There is also tannin extraction from the wood of cellar barrel's.  The levels of which, will depend on cellar time and age of the barrel itself.

 

The above in turn, dictates the required bottle aging period, in order to soften the tannins according to one's personal preferences.

 

Insofar as taste goes, it is a trade off.  Older Wines have a tendancy to lose it's fruitiness, but have a silkier mouth feel.

 

I hope this helps for a general answer, feel free with any specific aspects of aging that you may have.

 

To Your Health,

 

**  S L  **



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
Vmee...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2016 22:11

Quoting silverlion:

** Vmeeee  **

 

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this topic.  There is much to clarify on them, and I shall do my best to make it easily understandable.

 

Firstly, not all ' cheap ' wines need chilling.  The quality and not price, should decide that.  For example,  some of Trader Joe's  ' Two Buck Chuck ' Wines, have actually won Gold Medals.  Their 2005 Chardonnay, being one of them.  

My entire career in Wine, is focused on the following question :

 

How does one find a High Quality Wine,  at an affordable price ?.

 

I shall leave that question open, to answers from all viewers, before doing a summary.  Go ahead folks, let's learn together.

 

With regards to yeasts and fermentations, there are risks associated with variable choices.  The most important elements for success, being ideal temperature and time for the fungi to produce the desired results.

Too fast with higher temps. often result in Wines with burnt aromas, such as in match sticks.

Too slow and cool, runs the risk of ' stuck ' fermentations, with the resulting residual sugar.  It can be re-started, which is a dedicated tedious process, or bottled as ' off dry ', demi-sec,  etc. after Sterile Filtration.

In commercial winemaking, the tanks are innoculated with yeasts of choice, with the temps. monitored and kept under control.

 

With certain styles of wine, in the likes of Beaujolais, Carbonic Maceration is the technique to produce them with so called natural or wild yeasts.

The resulting wine, is low in tannins, somewhat fruity, but lacks aging potential and therefore subject to early spoilage as well.

 

As for your thoughts on Mead, I believe there are over forty styles produced in various parts of the world.

Usually based on tradition and available ingredients.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  **

 


 

Thank you Silverlion..

 

Ok… so does the level of alcohol in the wine and the speed at which it evaporates add to expense? Please define cheap if it’s not based on labor and time to get it to the market. What percentage of cost is the AGE?  I’ll wait for this answer to the above in thinking it will be part of the summary.

 

Patience, science and uncontrollable variables is why I’m fascinated by wine making… it’s truly an art with unsuspecting surprises in each stage. Making bread is very similar but one can learn how to control many of the variables. I’m interested in knowing what variables in commercial wine making CANNOT be controlled, or what could happen where there would be no remedy?

 

Although I’ve never discarded a batch, I'll admit I’ve made some awful tasting wine. I’m always hopeful and try to re-start the batch, but it seems to only get worst. In the end, I just store the wine that lacks skillful recovery techniques and save it for those who drink just about anything.

 

Why is said that the best wine yeast to use in a starter to restart a stuck fermentation is Champagne yeast, what does Champagne Yeast have or do not have compared to other yeast strands does not? 

 

As an effort to encourage my wine making adventures, the "wine aerator" in the photo was given to me as a gift. Kindly tell me if I’m hallucinating when thinking it give the wine a bit of carbonation :).

 


Available only
to logged in members

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
Maryclaire20...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sun, Sep 25, 2016 23:04

 

SL ,

 

The Question ...HOW DOES ONE FIND A QUALITY WINE , AT

AFFORDABLE PRICE ??

 

Yes I can , yes we can .. I drink once a year but I quite know where to buy a good stuff ..either I go to a wine Store or wine 

Section ..I can ask questions and seek better infos about wine.. Usually I have spent up to 10 Euro but I did too at 50 Euro.. In my opinion the Price is not a question in buying a good stuff ..There are some points and details to take into

considerations such as the taste , the dryness ( Tannin contents ), the Seal (official Test result ) , the availability ( top or flop ) , the Storage , the color , sugar rest , the bottle , cork or other cover and last but not the least , the durability ( Rw - 4 yrs , Rose a. white wine 2 yrs ) how long we can keep it ..

 

So SL , I hope Im doing it right ...Much to pay attention to but

its worth buying the right stuff ..

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sun, Sep 25, 2016 08:06

Quoting Vmeeee:

 

Thank you 4-that...

 

Cheap & Chill does make sense. I suppose cheap means fast fermentation time, less fruit, more sugar and short aging period? Personally find that when wines are at room temperature, the aroma and flavor is more intense. Kind-of like that ah-ha smell when we sauté onions and garlic before adding the rest of the ingredients. The whiff, when the smell is so delightful we begin to wonder why should add anything else to the pan. lol

 

Now I'm confused…so are all wines assumed to be fermented using manufactured yeast?  The first wine batch ever-made while was using untamed wild yeast while experimenting with the art of wine making. Possessing a bit of yeast bread baking experience from making my own yeast starters I knew it could be done. Without the science and not knowing the repercussions that may exist in the end...I used the old world method trying to avoid any chemical additives, if any.   The batched produced about 40-50 bottles and it I think took about 2-3 weeks before wild yeast activation begin while in a cool place, in October; but in the end collecting wild yeast from the air seemed to work. 

 

Thought that was the standard for home-makers of wine. I once read that the reason why the better wines are made high in the mountains, at high altitudes was the more sterile and cool climate so the barrels of wine can collect the wild yeast and slow down the fermentation.  Could this be a fable? :) 

Now-a-days…I use wine-yeast in a vile, or packet because it’s noticeably quicker.

 

Interesting... I suppose Mead could be altered into different styles.   I must admit that I liked mead the first time tasting it.  A self-serving thought as it has been my batch of mead, I haven’t taste any other mead since. So to be honest, I don't have a judgment or opinion how my honey-wine stacks-up with others, but I like to say it’s the best so-far. lol

 

 

 



** Vmeeee  **

 

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this topic.  There is much to clarify on them, and I shall do my best to make it easily understandable.

 

Firstly, not all ' cheap ' wines need chilling.  The quality and not price, should decide that.  For example,  some of Trader Joe's  ' Two Buck Chuck ' Wines, have actually won Gold Medals.  Their 2005 Chardonnay, being one of them.  

My entire career in Wine, is focused on the following question :

 

How does one find a High Quality Wine,  at an affordable price ?.

 

I shall leave that question open, to answers from all viewers, before doing a summary.  Go ahead folks, let's learn together.

 

With regards to yeasts and fermentations, there are risks associated with variable choices.  The most important elements for success, being ideal temperature and time for the fungi to produce the desired results.

Too fast with higher temps. often result in Wines with burnt aromas, such as in match sticks.

Too slow and cool, runs the risk of ' stuck ' fermentations, with the resulting residual sugar.  It can be re-started, which is a dedicated tedious process, or bottled as ' off dry ', demi-sec,  etc. after Sterile Filtration.

In commercial winemaking, the tanks are innoculated with yeasts of choice, with the temps. monitored and kept under control.

 

With certain styles of wine, in the likes of Beaujolais, Carbonic Maceration is the technique to produce them with so called natural or wild yeasts.

The resulting wine, is low in tannins, somewhat fruity, but lacks aging potential and therefore subject to early spoilage as well.

 

As for your thoughts on Mead, I believe there are over forty styles produced in various parts of the world.

Usually based on tradition and available ingredients.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  **

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
born1t...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sat, Sep 24, 2016 18:32

Quoting silverlion:

~~ Dear Friends ~~

 

As a  Globally  Experienced  Wine-Maker, I will do my best to answer any and all Questions you may have regarding this topic, with pleasure.  This blog is intended to be inter-active and I welcome your input so we may all learn from it with courteous discussion.

 

Many First Dates  are " cemented " with a great Dinner & Fine Wine .....a good starting point.  Then the next episode.... What Wine shall we have for Brunch Dear ?....

 

Eventually it may shift to... Varietals...Alcohol Percentages...Regions...Vintages...Aromas... Volatile Acidity....  Info on Labels....Sulphites....Tannins.... Health Issues.... Marketing Hype....White Merlot.... California Champagne .... Fermentations .... Filtration ..... Corks  vs  Screw Tops .... Wine Glasses.... Tears  vs  Legs ...and the list goes on.... 

 

To Your Health....Cheers,

 

~~ S L ~~

 



Good evening Mr.SL my question is what does age have to do with wine, I'm not a wine drinker nor any beverage with alcohol, but in my younger days I did participate and I have many friends/ family members that do. And is a age wine better, and if so how many years of age is sufficient. 

 

Yours truly,  Mr. Born1top.

  Love & peace.



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
Vmee...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sat, Sep 24, 2016 16:24

Quoting silverlion:

**  Vmeeee  **

 

To answer your questions : 

 

Firstly " Mead "  is an alcoholic beverage, with most of it's fermentable sugars obtained from Honey.  In addition to various fruit, spices, grains, hops, and water, it is often made in various styles such as sweet or dry, still or sparkling.

 

Although Honey Wine and Mead are basically the same, some cultures claim that their " Honey Wine ", is fermented with wild natural yeasts, and therefore is not Mead, which for the most part is fermented with wine making yeasts.   That non-sense even confuses me at times.

 

With regards to temperature for wine appreciation, a lot of that depends on the quality of the wine, and some of it can be personal tastes as well.

 

Besides Sparkling Wines, if it needs to be deeply chilled, the chances are more than likely,  that it is poor quality wine.

In General, cellar temperatures of around 55°F, is a good rule of thumb to follow,  in order to enjoy good quality wines, regardless of it's color.

 

**  S L  **

 


 

Thank you 4-that...

 

Cheap & Chill does make sense. I suppose cheap means fast fermentation time, less fruit, more sugar and short aging period? Personally find that when wines are at room temperature, the aroma and flavor is more intense. Kind-of like that ah-ha smell when we sauté onions and garlic before adding the rest of the ingredients. The whiff, when the smell is so delightful we begin to wonder why should add anything else to the pan. lol

 

Now I'm confused…so are all wines assumed to be fermented using manufactured yeast?  The first wine batch ever-made while was using untamed wild yeast while experimenting with the art of wine making. Possessing a bit of yeast bread baking experience from making my own yeast starters I knew it could be done. Without the science and not knowing the repercussions that may exist in the end...I used the old world method trying to avoid any chemical additives, if any.   The batched produced about 40-50 bottles and it I think took about 2-3 weeks before wild yeast activation begin while in a cool place, in October; but in the end collecting wild yeast from the air seemed to work. 

 

Thought that was the standard for home-makers of wine. I once read that the reason why the better wines are made high in the mountains, at high altitudes was the more sterile and cool climate so the barrels of wine can collect the wild yeast and slow down the fermentation.  Could this be a fable? :) 

Now-a-days…I use wine-yeast in a vile, or packet because it’s noticeably quicker.

 

Interesting... I suppose Mead could be altered into different styles.   I must admit that I liked mead the first time tasting it.  A self-serving thought as it has been my batch of mead, I haven’t taste any other mead since. So to be honest, I don't have a judgment or opinion how my honey-wine stacks-up with others, but I like to say it’s the best so-far. lol

 

 

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Tue, Sep 20, 2016 08:19

Quoting Vmeeee:

How lovely to offer your talents across the ocean. Not often does one get the opportunity to hear from the hands on talent. Thank you. 

 

Here's a question that I read a lot of material on... but never satisfied with the explanation.  Historical refrigeration did not exist... so were they basically tolerable?

 

To be chilled; or not to be chilled? What are the suggestions’ to get lost in the fragrance and awaken the palate?

 

What do you think about mead, some refer to mead is honey-wine?

 

Thank you... may peace be with you.



**  Vmeeee  **

 

To answer your questions : 

 

Firstly " Mead "  is an alcoholic beverage, with most of it's fermentable sugars obtained from Honey.  In addition to various fruit, spices, grains, hops, and water, it is often made in various styles such as sweet or dry, still or sparkling.

 

Although Honey Wine and Mead are basically the same, some cultures claim that their " Honey Wine ", is fermented with wild natural yeasts, and therefore is not Mead, which for the most part is fermented with wine making yeasts.   That non-sense even confuses me at times.

 

With regards to temperature for wine appreciation, a lot of that depends on the quality of the wine, and some of it can be personal tastes as well.

 

Besides Sparkling Wines, if it needs to be deeply chilled, the chances are more than likely,  that it is poor quality wine.

In General, cellar temperatures of around 55°F, is a good rule of thumb to follow,  in order to enjoy good quality wines, regardless of it's color.

 

**  S L  **

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    2 Likes Bookmark and Share
Vmee...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sat, Sep 17, 2016 16:47

How lovely to offer your talents across the ocean. Not often does one get the opportunity to hear from the hands on talent. Thank you. 

 

Here's a question that I read a lot of material on... but never satisfied with the explanation.  Historical refrigeration did not exist... so were they basically tolerable?

 

To be chilled; or not to be chilled? What are the suggestions’ to get lost in the fragrance and awaken the palate?

 

What do you think about mead, some refer to mead is honey-wine?

 

Thank you... may peace be with you.



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
Jenkne...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Mon, Jul 22, 2013 19:26

Quoting BeWell:

Dear Silverlion--the official Millionaire Match wine expert,

Although I am not a wine connoisseur...... at least not anymore, I thought this wine chiller tip I got from a friend (see below) was kind of a fun and unusual idea.

 

What do you think about it? Would it ruin the wine? Or would it add some fun to it? I'm thinking about serving wine this way to future guests............ BeWell



I think it's a great idea to use frozen grapes.

 

If I make a beverage in a punch bowl (like sangria), I take my bundt cake ring and freeze some of the beverage along with several pieces of fruit in it and once frozen, i place it in the punch bowl. Keeps it cold,it's pretty to look at and eventually you have fruit to eat.

I also use liquid filled (turned frozen) plastic decorative ice cubes, place them in your drinks or use them to keep buffet food like shrimp,etc.,cold.



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Mon, Jul 22, 2013 04:37

Quoting BeWell:

Dear Silverlion--the official Millionaire Match wine expert,

Although I am not a wine connoisseur...... at least not anymore, I thought this wine chiller tip I got from a friend (see below) was kind of a fun and unusual idea.

 

What do you think about it? Would it ruin the wine? Or would it add some fun to it? I'm thinking about serving wine this way to future guests............ BeWell



~~ BeWell ~~

 

What a Terrific,  Creative and Practical idea.  Thanks for sharing this.... love it !.

 

My suggestion would be to freeze the grapes in small bunches, keeping the little stems ( pedicels ) attached to the berries.  This will prevent any interference to The Wine Quality as the berries eventually thaw out. 

 

To add some fun, you may use other colorful frozen berries. Just make sure they are intact and clean,  so as not to  " bleed " into the wine.

 

Hmm !... too kind to call me an " expert ".... fact is, great members like You, help keep me on my toes and are much appreciated.

 

Hugs,

 

~~ S L ~~



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    1 Like Bookmark and Share
BeWe...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sun, Jul 21, 2013 15:31

Dear Silverlion--the official Millionaire Match wine expert,

Although I am not a wine connoisseur...... at least not anymore, I thought this wine chiller tip I got from a friend (see below) was kind of a fun and unusual idea.

 

What do you think about it? Would it ruin the wine? Or would it add some fun to it? I'm thinking about serving wine this way to future guests............ BeWell


Available only
to logged in members

BeWell and wishing you only the best ! ..................;-D

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    2 Likes Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Thu, Jul 04, 2013 07:56

Quoting emmanuelst:

Hi SL

St. Agnes... a vin de paille and a Vidal Icewine  Glen Sutton. Quebec Oh Canada. We do have more than snow.

bonjour cherie



~~ emmanuelst ~~

 

So nice to see you again after a long  while.  Thanks fot the suggestions on Ice-Wines.

 

Canada has certainly captured lots of attention with them and is the worlds largest producer of Ice-Wine, after Germanys Eiswein, ....thanks to the cool climate.

 

Vidal is a widely planted grape there but the Canadian Ice-Wines made from Viognier  are very note-worthy from warmer vintages.

 

Best Regards,

 

~~ S L ~~

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    1 Like Bookmark and Share
emmanuel...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Thu, Jul 04, 2013 05:56

Apple wines and iced Apple... look to Quebec, Canada for these...



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
emmanuel...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Thu, Jul 04, 2013 05:44

Hi SL

St. Agnes... a vin de paille and a Vidal Icewine  Glen Sutton. Quebec Oh Canada. We do have more than snow.

bonjour cherie



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    1 Like Bookmark and Share
Diana33...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 22:45

Awww…thanks SL.  You are very kind….and I appreciate that you didn’t say I look like Barbara Streisand.  Lololol…..*wink* 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    2 Likes Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 13:45

Quoting Mtnsunny:

My knowledge on wine is very limited....but the one thing I do know, is that Moscato is a wonderful dessert wine.   A sweet wine is a sweet wine, like a Sweet Riesling, but a dessert wine...is different,  light bodied, almost a perfume like fragrance (aromatic), and a little on the sparkling side.  What's your thoughts on dessert wines SL?  Who makes some of the best Moscatos?

 

 

Mtnsunny :)


~~ Mtnsunny ~~  &  Lulu  ~~

 

 

My recollection of  " Moscato " ..... is that firstly it's the Italian word for  "Muscat "  grapes of which there are at least four principal varieties in several hues making for wines of various colors, from white to red and a few in-between. The main character of Muscats,  is the aromatic....    " musk " like perfume.

 

 

In Italy these Muscats are known as....Moscato Bianco,  Giallo,  Rosa Trentini, and Alexandria.  To add to the confusion, bottles are usually labelled according to Region instead of the specific grape variety. For example, Moscato di Asti is made from the historic white  " Bianco " version typical of the Piedmont Region, whereas Moscato Giallo and Rosa Trentini from Alto Adige, are Golden and Pink respectively.

 

 

A Drier, crisper style of Moscato is produced in the Trentino Region. The majority of Moscatos are low in alcohol, at least lightly sweet, pair well with fruit and fruit based desserts. Due to their intense perfume, often regarded as Dessert Wines, but are not the best examples of such.

 

 

True Dessert Wines are made from grapes that attract Botrytis or " Noble Rot "....which increases the levels of Tartaric Acid and Grape Sugars. This stimulates the production of Glycerol that gives the wine its Viscosity and impact the aromas and flavors in the finished wines.

 

 

Best examples are from Sauternes, south of Bordeaux and unmatched by any other global wine region in the production of  " Unfortified " Sweet Dessert Wines.  Varietals in Sauternes are strictly Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle with blending allowed.

 

 

Many other so called Dessert Wines often contain grape consentrates which is allowed in California where chaptalisation is illegal ?.....go figure...!.

 

 

Stay Sweet,

 

 

~~ S L ~~



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    1 Like Bookmark and Share
RealtorLu...
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 05:59

No other fruits than grapes is an eye opener. I could've sworn there were several other fruits in that wine. 

 

I appreciate that you're taking the time to educate us in this topic. I had figured that pressing the grapes may have been for the purpose of extracting just the juice in order to get a finer wine and crushing was to get stronger flavors as in the dryer wines. Thanks SL!

 

Mtnsunny, I've never been a fan of Moscato but if SL gives us a recommendation I will try it. It is nice to have a nice dessert wine after a good meal.

 

All the best, -Lulu-



Lulu in Dallas

Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    Like Bookmark and Share
silverli... Recommended
Available only
to logged in members


Posted on Sun, Jun 30, 2013 20:20

Quoting RealtorLulu:

Wow! That's a lot of information on a subject we all seem to love. Thanks SL for sharing your knowledge. I have always wondered about the various types of wine and how the grapes and other ingredients were chosen. Like Hope, I was a white wine drinker but have come to prefer Cabernet, Merlot, Syrah and Pino.

 

 

 

One thing I thought was that Riesling was always sweet. I thought of it as a dessert wine. I will have to check out the dry Riesling.

 

 

 

Question: I heard someone talking about crushing and pressing the grapes. What's the difference?

 

 

 

While I was living in California, I had a chance to taste some wine from several wineries and was a member of one of them.  I was once invited to a private wine tasting 7 course dinner in Palm Springs. One of the courses was served with a wine that after a few seconds I could recognize various fruit flavors. It was quite an adventure. I didn't realize that how many other fruits were used. 

 

 

 

Great info, thanks

 

 



~~ Realtor Lulu ~~

 

Answer to your question as to the difference between Crushing and Pressing is as follows...

 

1)  Crushing : Basic wine-making operation of breaking open the grape berries so that the juice is readily available to the yeast for fermentation. Modern equipment are called  " crusher de-stemmers " , removing all the stems only without crushing the seeds that can impart bitter tannins.

 

2 )  Pressing  :  Wine-making operation whereby pressure is applied to grapes or grape pomace in order to squeeze the liquid out of the solids. There are various types of equipment developed over the years to accomplish this.

 

In Red Wine production, pressing of the pomace is done after fermentation when sufficient color and tannins are extracted from the skins.  White grapes are normally pressed prior to fermentation as they are made with much less skin contact.

 

As for your wine tasting adventure, the fruit component in table wines come from the various grape varietals. Other fruits are not used to create this, unless a bottle is specifically labelled such as  " plum wine, peach wine " ...etc.

 

For quality grapes, remember it's all about.....location, location, location...just as in real estate !.

 

~~ S L ~~

 



Reply / add comments   Quote   Report abuse    2 Likes Bookmark and Share
Follow - Email me when people comment