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All Your Wine Related Questions ?..... Sort by:
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Posted on Sat, Jun 22, 2013 19:59

~~ Dear Friends ~~

 

As a  Globally  Experienced  Wine-Maker, I will do my best to answer any and all Questions you may have regarding this topic, with pleasure.  This blog is intended to be inter-active and I welcome your input so we may all learn from it with courteous discussion.

 

Many First Dates  are " cemented " with a great Dinner & Fine Wine .....a good starting point.  Then the next episode.... What Wine shall we have for Brunch Dear ?....

 

Eventually it may shift to... Varietals...Alcohol Percentages...Regions...Vintages...Aromas... Volatile Acidity....  Info on Labels....Sulphites....Tannins.... Health Issues.... Marketing Hype....White Merlot.... California Champagne .... Fermentations .... Filtration ..... Corks  vs  Screw Tops .... Wine Glasses.... Tears  vs  Legs ...and the list goes on.... 

 

To Your Health....Cheers,

 

~~ S L ~~

 



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Posted on Sun, Oct 09, 2016 06:38

Whose blogs are these any way that would allow visitors to stimulate chaos by attacking others; then offering NO apologies or value to the readers?   Silverlion it's my opinion that you are literally providing a forum for hate speeches. Hateful comments having nothing to do with your topic or question are allowed on your blogs.    

 

A week ago when ask to join the blog conversations after withdrawing. It was already perceived that the only way to maintain the integrity of an intelligent conversation is by blocking feeble minded people who add "No Value", those who wish to control the thoughts of others, and those who refuse to address the define topic, and using the forum to promote personal issues.  

 

This type of person brings chaos to any experience as their only means to defend unsupportive rhetoric and thoughts by changing the conversation to trivial nonsense to capture the attention they would never receive otherwise.

 

Indeed…I’m from another planet and probably another galaxy as we here have ZERO (0) tolerance for idiocy. On that note… sorry Silverlion; this environment is not suitable for one's mental health so just stick a fork in me; I’m done. :)

 

May peace be with you where-ever you are…  


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Posted on Sat, Oct 08, 2016 05:04

Quoting Vmeeee:

Silverloin...

 

Your following statement has opened a whole new world for me...

 

 

Silverlion wrote: "I can't think of a situation where there is no remedy."

 

… don't you know you may have just created a dangerous vintner-monster, lol.



**  Vmeeee  **

 

Speaking of remedies, a thought regarding the Co2 content you had mentioned, crossed my mind.

 

One easy fix, is to toss in some copper coins as in pennies etc, into the bottle and allow it to breathe for a while.  

 

Do not hesitate with any other questions you may have.

 

To Your Health,

 

**  S L  **



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Posted on Sat, Oct 01, 2016 11:49

Quoting Dolcedileche:

Good evening all!

 

Seems I came in (late) to a great conversation.  Will have to figure out a way to capture all the great advise.  Thanks.

 

Silverlion - started my first batch of wine in June. I'm a true novice and not knowing what to expect, tossed that batch in July.  Knowing better and since then have concocted:

  • Mead
  • Mystery Fruit wine..(manical laugh)
  • BeSap wine
  • Grape wine
  • Dandelion wine
  • Jalepeno wine
  • Peach wine
  • Vodka infused peach, apple, pear, blueberries, and plum liquers.  Still looking for Casises - hard to find here.

 

Will be starting a white wine for grins and giggles.  Strawberry wine to age for one year in celebration of a relative's new marriage.

 

What made me do it?  The holidays are coming and needed ideas for presents..smile

 

I'm no where near your level of expertise but REALLY enjoy changing grapes into wine...yuk, yuk.

 

Remain blessed

 

Dolce



**  Dolcedileche  **

 

Your list of wines sound very intriguing.   I would love to taste through them. 

 

My first ever fermentation, was with pineapple skins.  The jar blew open and pieces of pineapple hung from the kitchen ceiling.   What a Royal mess that was. 

 

I have great respect for home brewers,  having graduated from there. 

In fact,  some of the best beer I've ever tasted,  came from micro home brews. 

 

No commercial production,  can come anywhere close to them. 

 

Keep an eye on those temps, 

 

**  S L  **



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Posted on Fri, Sep 30, 2016 09:20

Quoting Vmeeee:

Silverlion, you are fascinating…

 

A Master Sommelier, indeed!  The understanding is not in what you say, but in how you’ve delivered the message. You have given me a boat-load of valuable information and for that I'm thankful.  May peace be with you :>).



**  Vmeeee  **

 

I am equally grateful for your obviously knowledgeable questions and participation. 

The word ' synergy ' comes to mind. 

 

A great big Thanks for posting that picture of a flight of vertical tasting glasses with Red Wine. 

 

It is exactly the only way to weed out the best from the rest.   As an advocate for blind tastings,  may all viewers take a close look at the picture. 

 

Some may think that it is only for Oenophiles at an auction such as Christie's,  but very practical to conduct with friends and family.  

 

It is the focus of my teaching,  on how to find the best wine within one's budget.

Let's not forget, even bidders at an auction,  have a budget.  

 

Cheers, 

 

**  S L  **

 

 



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Posted on Thu, Sep 29, 2016 16:28

Good evening all!

 

Seems I came in (late) to a great conversation.  Will have to figure out a way to capture all the great advise.  Thanks.

 

Silverlion - started my first batch of wine in June. I'm a true novice and not knowing what to expect, tossed that batch in July.  Knowing better and since then have concocted:

  • Mead
  • Mystery Fruit wine..(manical laugh)
  • BeSap wine
  • Grape wine
  • Dandelion wine
  • Jalepeno wine
  • Peach wine
  • Vodka infused peach, apple, pear, blueberries, and plum liquers.  Still looking for Casises - hard to find here.

 

Will be starting a white wine for grins and giggles.  Strawberry wine to age for one year in celebration of a relative's new marriage.

 

What made me do it?  The holidays are coming and needed ideas for presents..smile

 

I'm no where near your level of expertise but REALLY enjoy changing grapes into wine...yuk, yuk.

 

Remain blessed

 

Dolce



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Posted on Thu, Sep 29, 2016 11:52

Quoting silverlion:


**  Vmeeee  **

 

Thanks for the follow up questions, and your kind patience.  The past week has been somewhat hectic.

 

Levels of alcohol, do not add to the expense in general table wine production, as long as they are within legal limits.  There are however, protocols for tax purposes, which can impact the prices based on the various other categories of wine.  

For example, ' Port ' has to have a minimum of 18 %, in order to qualify as such, and is taxed accordingly.

 

Other factors that may contribute to low budget wines, are those made from bulk juice, depending on the market and vintage situations.  There are no rules in terms of age vs price,  that is purely flexible and more dependant on supply vs demand, and business status.

 

The variable in commercial wine production, that cannot be controlled, is the quality of the harvest with each different vintage.  As you may be aware, that quality is the product of weather conditions, for which we have no control.

 

I can't think of a situation where there is no remedy.  Good winemakers rarely encounter such.

 

To restart a stuck fermentation, Champagne yeasts are the choice as it tends to be a little more aggressive and thrives in low sugar content juices that are the norm in Sparkling wine production.

 

The Wine Aerator, is a useful gadget to help dispel  ' free So2 ' which is the initial sulphur aroma, prior to allowing the wine to breathe.

If you subsequently have any fizz or carbonic activity, it cannot be a cause of the aerator, but inherent in the wine itself.

 

Hope the above answers are satisfactory, do not hesitate with any others.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  ** 

 



Silverloin...

 

Your following statement has opened a whole new world for me...

 

 

Silverlion wrote: "I can't think of a situation where there is no remedy."

 

… don't you know you may have just created a dangerous vintner-monster, lol.


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Posted on Thu, Sep 29, 2016 11:35

Quoting silverlion:


**  Vmeeee  **

 

Thanks for the follow up questions, and your kind patience.  The past week has been somewhat hectic.

 

Levels of alcohol, do not add to the expense in general table wine production, as long as they are within legal limits.  There are however, protocols for tax purposes, which can impact the prices based on the various other categories of wine.  

For example, ' Port ' has to have a minimum of 18 %, in order to qualify as such, and is taxed accordingly.

 

Other factors that may contribute to low budget wines, are those made from bulk juice, depending on the market and vintage situations.  There are no rules in terms of age vs price,  that is purely flexible and more dependant on supply vs demand, and business status.

 

The variable in commercial wine production, that cannot be controlled, is the quality of the harvest with each different vintage.  As you may be aware, that quality is the product of weather conditions, for which we have no control.

 

I can't think of a situation where there is no remedy.  Good winemakers rarely encounter such.

 

To restart a stuck fermentation, Champagne yeasts are the choice as it tends to be a little more aggressive and thrives in low sugar content juices that are the norm in Sparkling wine production.

 

The Wine Aerator, is a useful gadget to help dispel  ' free So2 ' which is the initial sulphur aroma, prior to allowing the wine to breathe.

If you subsequently have any fizz or carbonic activity, it cannot be a cause of the aerator, but inherent in the wine itself.

 

Hope the above answers are satisfactory, do not hesitate with any others.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  ** 

 



Silverlion, you are fascinating…

 

A Master Sommelier, indeed!  The understanding is not in what you say, but in how you’ve delivered the message. You have given me a boat-load of valuable information and for that I'm thankful.  May peace be with you :>).


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Posted on Thu, Sep 29, 2016 07:15

Quoting Vmeeee:

 

Thank you Silverlion..

 

Ok… so does the level of alcohol in the wine and the speed at which it evaporates add to expense? Please define cheap if it’s not based on labor and time to get it to the market. What percentage of cost is the AGE?  I’ll wait for this answer to the above in thinking it will be part of the summary.

 

Patience, science and uncontrollable variables is why I’m fascinated by wine making… it’s truly an art with unsuspecting surprises in each stage. Making bread is very similar but one can learn how to control many of the variables. I’m interested in knowing what variables in commercial wine making CANNOT be controlled, or what could happen where there would be no remedy?

 

Although I’ve never discarded a batch, I'll admit I’ve made some awful tasting wine. I’m always hopeful and try to re-start the batch, but it seems to only get worst. In the end, I just store the wine that lacks skillful recovery techniques and save it for those who drink just about anything.

 

Why is said that the best wine yeast to use in a starter to restart a stuck fermentation is Champagne yeast, what does Champagne Yeast have or do not have compared to other yeast strands does not? 

 

As an effort to encourage my wine making adventures, the "wine aerator" in the photo was given to me as a gift. Kindly tell me if I’m hallucinating when thinking it give the wine a bit of carbonation :).

 




**  Vmeeee  **

 

Thanks for the follow up questions, and your kind patience.  The past week has been somewhat hectic.

 

Levels of alcohol, do not add to the expense in general table wine production, as long as they are within legal limits.  There are however, protocols for tax purposes, which can impact the prices based on the various other categories of wine.  

For example, ' Port ' has to have a minimum of 18 %, in order to qualify as such, and is taxed accordingly.

 

Other factors that may contribute to low budget wines, are those made from bulk juice, depending on the market and vintage situations.  There are no rules in terms of age vs price,  that is purely flexible and more dependant on supply vs demand, and business status.

 

The variable in commercial wine production, that cannot be controlled, is the quality of the harvest with each different vintage.  As you may be aware, that quality is the product of weather conditions, for which we have no control.

 

I can't think of a situation where there is no remedy.  Good winemakers rarely encounter such.

 

To restart a stuck fermentation, Champagne yeasts are the choice as it tends to be a little more aggressive and thrives in low sugar content juices that are the norm in Sparkling wine production.

 

The Wine Aerator, is a useful gadget to help dispel  ' free So2 ' which is the initial sulphur aroma, prior to allowing the wine to breathe.

If you subsequently have any fizz or carbonic activity, it cannot be a cause of the aerator, but inherent in the wine itself.

 

Hope the above answers are satisfactory, do not hesitate with any others.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  ** 

 



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Posted on Wed, Sep 28, 2016 14:51

Quoting Maryclaire2000:

 

SL ,

 

The Question ...HOW DOES ONE FIND A QUALITY WINE , AT

AFFORDABLE PRICE ??

 

Yes I can , yes we can .. I drink once a year but I quite know where to buy a good stuff ..either I go to a wine Store or wine 

Section ..I can ask questions and seek better infos about wine.. Usually I have spent up to 10 Euro but I did too at 50 Euro.. In my opinion the Price is not a question in buying a good stuff ..There are some points and details to take into

considerations such as the taste , the dryness ( Tannin contents ), the Seal (official Test result ) , the availability ( top or flop ) , the Storage , the color , sugar rest , the bottle , cork or other cover and last but not the least , the durability ( Rw - 4 yrs , Rose a. white wine 2 yrs ) how long we can keep it ..

 

So SL , I hope Im doing it right ...Much to pay attention to but

its worth buying the right stuff ..

 


**  maryclaire2000  **

 

If that approach works for you,  as a once a year consumer,  it's fine. 

 

With everyday wine consumers,  it's a lot more involved than that.   It is the focus of my teachings in all the tasting sessions. 

 

Essentially,  how to judge and find a high quality wine,  within a reasonable budget,  via Blind Tastings. 

 

**  S L  **



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Posted on Tue, Sep 27, 2016 07:31

Quoting born1top:

Good evening Mr.SL my question is what does age have to do with wine, I'm not a wine drinker nor any beverage with alcohol, but in my younger days I did participate and I have many friends/ family members that do. And is a age wine better, and if so how many years of age is sufficient. 

 

Yours truly,  Mr. Born1top.

  Love & peace.



**  born1top  **

 

Nice question, for which I Thank you.  To make it easily understandable, I shall refrain from complex Oenology, as much as possible.

 

The primary benefit to age wines, is to soften the ' astringency ' , or mouth feel.  This puckering sensation comes from the grape skin tannins, which is inherent in all young Red Wines.  It is also the component that produces the intensity of color, again largely in Red Wines.

 

The level or amount of tannins, depend on several factors such as,  grape varietal, quality of a harvest,  wine making techniques, desired style of wine and so on.  There is also tannin extraction from the wood of cellar barrel's.  The levels of which, will depend on cellar time and age of the barrel itself.

 

The above in turn, dictates the required bottle aging period, in order to soften the tannins according to one's personal preferences.

 

Insofar as taste goes, it is a trade off.  Older Wines have a tendancy to lose it's fruitiness, but have a silkier mouth feel.

 

I hope this helps for a general answer, feel free with any specific aspects of aging that you may have.

 

To Your Health,

 

**  S L  **



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Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2016 22:11

Quoting silverlion:

** Vmeeee  **

 

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this topic.  There is much to clarify on them, and I shall do my best to make it easily understandable.

 

Firstly, not all ' cheap ' wines need chilling.  The quality and not price, should decide that.  For example,  some of Trader Joe's  ' Two Buck Chuck ' Wines, have actually won Gold Medals.  Their 2005 Chardonnay, being one of them.  

My entire career in Wine, is focused on the following question :

 

How does one find a High Quality Wine,  at an affordable price ?.

 

I shall leave that question open, to answers from all viewers, before doing a summary.  Go ahead folks, let's learn together.

 

With regards to yeasts and fermentations, there are risks associated with variable choices.  The most important elements for success, being ideal temperature and time for the fungi to produce the desired results.

Too fast with higher temps. often result in Wines with burnt aromas, such as in match sticks.

Too slow and cool, runs the risk of ' stuck ' fermentations, with the resulting residual sugar.  It can be re-started, which is a dedicated tedious process, or bottled as ' off dry ', demi-sec,  etc. after Sterile Filtration.

In commercial winemaking, the tanks are innoculated with yeasts of choice, with the temps. monitored and kept under control.

 

With certain styles of wine, in the likes of Beaujolais, Carbonic Maceration is the technique to produce them with so called natural or wild yeasts.

The resulting wine, is low in tannins, somewhat fruity, but lacks aging potential and therefore subject to early spoilage as well.

 

As for your thoughts on Mead, I believe there are over forty styles produced in various parts of the world.

Usually based on tradition and available ingredients.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  **

 


 

Thank you Silverlion..

 

Ok… so does the level of alcohol in the wine and the speed at which it evaporates add to expense? Please define cheap if it’s not based on labor and time to get it to the market. What percentage of cost is the AGE?  I’ll wait for this answer to the above in thinking it will be part of the summary.

 

Patience, science and uncontrollable variables is why I’m fascinated by wine making… it’s truly an art with unsuspecting surprises in each stage. Making bread is very similar but one can learn how to control many of the variables. I’m interested in knowing what variables in commercial wine making CANNOT be controlled, or what could happen where there would be no remedy?

 

Although I’ve never discarded a batch, I'll admit I’ve made some awful tasting wine. I’m always hopeful and try to re-start the batch, but it seems to only get worst. In the end, I just store the wine that lacks skillful recovery techniques and save it for those who drink just about anything.

 

Why is said that the best wine yeast to use in a starter to restart a stuck fermentation is Champagne yeast, what does Champagne Yeast have or do not have compared to other yeast strands does not? 

 

As an effort to encourage my wine making adventures, the "wine aerator" in the photo was given to me as a gift. Kindly tell me if I’m hallucinating when thinking it give the wine a bit of carbonation :).

 


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Posted on Sun, Sep 25, 2016 23:04

 

SL ,

 

The Question ...HOW DOES ONE FIND A QUALITY WINE , AT

AFFORDABLE PRICE ??

 

Yes I can , yes we can .. I drink once a year but I quite know where to buy a good stuff ..either I go to a wine Store or wine 

Section ..I can ask questions and seek better infos about wine.. Usually I have spent up to 10 Euro but I did too at 50 Euro.. In my opinion the Price is not a question in buying a good stuff ..There are some points and details to take into

considerations such as the taste , the dryness ( Tannin contents ), the Seal (official Test result ) , the availability ( top or flop ) , the Storage , the color , sugar rest , the bottle , cork or other cover and last but not the least , the durability ( Rw - 4 yrs , Rose a. white wine 2 yrs ) how long we can keep it ..

 

So SL , I hope Im doing it right ...Much to pay attention to but

its worth buying the right stuff ..

 



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Posted on Sun, Sep 25, 2016 08:06

Quoting Vmeeee:

 

Thank you 4-that...

 

Cheap & Chill does make sense. I suppose cheap means fast fermentation time, less fruit, more sugar and short aging period? Personally find that when wines are at room temperature, the aroma and flavor is more intense. Kind-of like that ah-ha smell when we sauté onions and garlic before adding the rest of the ingredients. The whiff, when the smell is so delightful we begin to wonder why should add anything else to the pan. lol

 

Now I'm confused…so are all wines assumed to be fermented using manufactured yeast?  The first wine batch ever-made while was using untamed wild yeast while experimenting with the art of wine making. Possessing a bit of yeast bread baking experience from making my own yeast starters I knew it could be done. Without the science and not knowing the repercussions that may exist in the end...I used the old world method trying to avoid any chemical additives, if any.   The batched produced about 40-50 bottles and it I think took about 2-3 weeks before wild yeast activation begin while in a cool place, in October; but in the end collecting wild yeast from the air seemed to work. 

 

Thought that was the standard for home-makers of wine. I once read that the reason why the better wines are made high in the mountains, at high altitudes was the more sterile and cool climate so the barrels of wine can collect the wild yeast and slow down the fermentation.  Could this be a fable? :) 

Now-a-days…I use wine-yeast in a vile, or packet because it’s noticeably quicker.

 

Interesting... I suppose Mead could be altered into different styles.   I must admit that I liked mead the first time tasting it.  A self-serving thought as it has been my batch of mead, I haven’t taste any other mead since. So to be honest, I don't have a judgment or opinion how my honey-wine stacks-up with others, but I like to say it’s the best so-far. lol

 

 

 



** Vmeeee  **

 

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this topic.  There is much to clarify on them, and I shall do my best to make it easily understandable.

 

Firstly, not all ' cheap ' wines need chilling.  The quality and not price, should decide that.  For example,  some of Trader Joe's  ' Two Buck Chuck ' Wines, have actually won Gold Medals.  Their 2005 Chardonnay, being one of them.  

My entire career in Wine, is focused on the following question :

 

How does one find a High Quality Wine,  at an affordable price ?.

 

I shall leave that question open, to answers from all viewers, before doing a summary.  Go ahead folks, let's learn together.

 

With regards to yeasts and fermentations, there are risks associated with variable choices.  The most important elements for success, being ideal temperature and time for the fungi to produce the desired results.

Too fast with higher temps. often result in Wines with burnt aromas, such as in match sticks.

Too slow and cool, runs the risk of ' stuck ' fermentations, with the resulting residual sugar.  It can be re-started, which is a dedicated tedious process, or bottled as ' off dry ', demi-sec,  etc. after Sterile Filtration.

In commercial winemaking, the tanks are innoculated with yeasts of choice, with the temps. monitored and kept under control.

 

With certain styles of wine, in the likes of Beaujolais, Carbonic Maceration is the technique to produce them with so called natural or wild yeasts.

The resulting wine, is low in tannins, somewhat fruity, but lacks aging potential and therefore subject to early spoilage as well.

 

As for your thoughts on Mead, I believe there are over forty styles produced in various parts of the world.

Usually based on tradition and available ingredients.

 

Cheers,

 

**  S L  **

 



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Posted on Sat, Sep 24, 2016 18:32

Quoting silverlion:

~~ Dear Friends ~~

 

As a  Globally  Experienced  Wine-Maker, I will do my best to answer any and all Questions you may have regarding this topic, with pleasure.  This blog is intended to be inter-active and I welcome your input so we may all learn from it with courteous discussion.

 

Many First Dates  are " cemented " with a great Dinner & Fine Wine .....a good starting point.  Then the next episode.... What Wine shall we have for Brunch Dear ?....

 

Eventually it may shift to... Varietals...Alcohol Percentages...Regions...Vintages...Aromas... Volatile Acidity....  Info on Labels....Sulphites....Tannins.... Health Issues.... Marketing Hype....White Merlot.... California Champagne .... Fermentations .... Filtration ..... Corks  vs  Screw Tops .... Wine Glasses.... Tears  vs  Legs ...and the list goes on.... 

 

To Your Health....Cheers,

 

~~ S L ~~

 



Good evening Mr.SL my question is what does age have to do with wine, I'm not a wine drinker nor any beverage with alcohol, but in my younger days I did participate and I have many friends/ family members that do. And is a age wine better, and if so how many years of age is sufficient. 

 

Yours truly,  Mr. Born1top.

  Love & peace.



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Posted on Sat, Sep 24, 2016 16:24

Quoting silverlion:

**  Vmeeee  **

 

To answer your questions : 

 

Firstly " Mead "  is an alcoholic beverage, with most of it's fermentable sugars obtained from Honey.  In addition to various fruit, spices, grains, hops, and water, it is often made in various styles such as sweet or dry, still or sparkling.

 

Although Honey Wine and Mead are basically the same, some cultures claim that their " Honey Wine ", is fermented with wild natural yeasts, and therefore is not Mead, which for the most part is fermented with wine making yeasts.   That non-sense even confuses me at times.

 

With regards to temperature for wine appreciation, a lot of that depends on the quality of the wine, and some of it can be personal tastes as well.

 

Besides Sparkling Wines, if it needs to be deeply chilled, the chances are more than likely,  that it is poor quality wine.

In General, cellar temperatures of around 55°F, is a good rule of thumb to follow,  in order to enjoy good quality wines, regardless of it's color.

 

**  S L  **

 


 

Thank you 4-that...

 

Cheap & Chill does make sense. I suppose cheap means fast fermentation time, less fruit, more sugar and short aging period? Personally find that when wines are at room temperature, the aroma and flavor is more intense. Kind-of like that ah-ha smell when we sauté onions and garlic before adding the rest of the ingredients. The whiff, when the smell is so delightful we begin to wonder why should add anything else to the pan. lol

 

Now I'm confused…so are all wines assumed to be fermented using manufactured yeast?  The first wine batch ever-made while was using untamed wild yeast while experimenting with the art of wine making. Possessing a bit of yeast bread baking experience from making my own yeast starters I knew it could be done. Without the science and not knowing the repercussions that may exist in the end...I used the old world method trying to avoid any chemical additives, if any.   The batched produced about 40-50 bottles and it I think took about 2-3 weeks before wild yeast activation begin while in a cool place, in October; but in the end collecting wild yeast from the air seemed to work. 

 

Thought that was the standard for home-makers of wine. I once read that the reason why the better wines are made high in the mountains, at high altitudes was the more sterile and cool climate so the barrels of wine can collect the wild yeast and slow down the fermentation.  Could this be a fable? :) 

Now-a-days…I use wine-yeast in a vile, or packet because it’s noticeably quicker.

 

Interesting... I suppose Mead could be altered into different styles.   I must admit that I liked mead the first time tasting it.  A self-serving thought as it has been my batch of mead, I haven’t taste any other mead since. So to be honest, I don't have a judgment or opinion how my honey-wine stacks-up with others, but I like to say it’s the best so-far. lol

 

 

 



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Posted on Tue, Sep 20, 2016 08:19

Quoting Vmeeee:

How lovely to offer your talents across the ocean. Not often does one get the opportunity to hear from the hands on talent. Thank you. 

 

Here's a question that I read a lot of material on... but never satisfied with the explanation.  Historical refrigeration did not exist... so were they basically tolerable?

 

To be chilled; or not to be chilled? What are the suggestions’ to get lost in the fragrance and awaken the palate?

 

What do you think about mead, some refer to mead is honey-wine?

 

Thank you... may peace be with you.



**  Vmeeee  **

 

To answer your questions : 

 

Firstly " Mead "  is an alcoholic beverage, with most of it's fermentable sugars obtained from Honey.  In addition to various fruit, spices, grains, hops, and water, it is often made in various styles such as sweet or dry, still or sparkling.

 

Although Honey Wine and Mead are basically the same, some cultures claim that their " Honey Wine ", is fermented with wild natural yeasts, and therefore is not Mead, which for the most part is fermented with wine making yeasts.   That non-sense even confuses me at times.

 

With regards to temperature for wine appreciation, a lot of that depends on the quality of the wine, and some of it can be personal tastes as well.

 

Besides Sparkling Wines, if it needs to be deeply chilled, the chances are more than likely,  that it is poor quality wine.

In General, cellar temperatures of around 55°F, is a good rule of thumb to follow,  in order to enjoy good quality wines, regardless of it's color.

 

**  S L  **

 



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Posted on Sat, Sep 17, 2016 16:47

How lovely to offer your talents across the ocean. Not often does one get the opportunity to hear from the hands on talent. Thank you. 

 

Here's a question that I read a lot of material on... but never satisfied with the explanation.  Historical refrigeration did not exist... so were they basically tolerable?

 

To be chilled; or not to be chilled? What are the suggestions’ to get lost in the fragrance and awaken the palate?

 

What do you think about mead, some refer to mead is honey-wine?

 

Thank you... may peace be with you.



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Posted on Mon, Jul 22, 2013 19:26

Quoting BeWell:

Dear Silverlion--the official Millionaire Match wine expert,

Although I am not a wine connoisseur...... at least not anymore, I thought this wine chiller tip I got from a friend (see below) was kind of a fun and unusual idea.

 

What do you think about it? Would it ruin the wine? Or would it add some fun to it? I'm thinking about serving wine this way to future guests............ BeWell



I think it's a great idea to use frozen grapes.

 

If I make a beverage in a punch bowl (like sangria), I take my bundt cake ring and freeze some of the beverage along with several pieces of fruit in it and once frozen, i place it in the punch bowl. Keeps it cold,it's pretty to look at and eventually you have fruit to eat.

I also use liquid filled (turned frozen) plastic decorative ice cubes, place them in your drinks or use them to keep buffet food like shrimp,etc.,cold.



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Posted on Mon, Jul 22, 2013 04:37

Quoting BeWell:

Dear Silverlion--the official Millionaire Match wine expert,

Although I am not a wine connoisseur...... at least not anymore, I thought this wine chiller tip I got from a friend (see below) was kind of a fun and unusual idea.

 

What do you think about it? Would it ruin the wine? Or would it add some fun to it? I'm thinking about serving wine this way to future guests............ BeWell



~~ BeWell ~~

 

What a Terrific,  Creative and Practical idea.  Thanks for sharing this.... love it !.

 

My suggestion would be to freeze the grapes in small bunches, keeping the little stems ( pedicels ) attached to the berries.  This will prevent any interference to The Wine Quality as the berries eventually thaw out. 

 

To add some fun, you may use other colorful frozen berries. Just make sure they are intact and clean,  so as not to  " bleed " into the wine.

 

Hmm !... too kind to call me an " expert ".... fact is, great members like You, help keep me on my toes and are much appreciated.

 

Hugs,

 

~~ S L ~~



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