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pretty_ladyyyyy
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Posted on Sat, Feb 02, 2013 06:39

 

A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS.....

 

THIS PAINTING IS WORTH 80 MILLION...... 

 

MONET S WATERLILIES.....

 

"Le Bassin Aux Nympheas by Claude Monet ($80,451,178)"

 

"Painted by the Impressionist master in 1919, it sold at Christie’s London auction house for a £40,921,250 pounds ($80,451,178) in June 2008, the highest price for a work of art sold by Christie’s in Europe. "

 

 "LONDON — The summer auction season here began at Christie’s on Tuesday night when a standing-room-only crowd of dealers, collectors and art lovers came from all over the world to watch and bid on one of the largest London sales the auction house has held. Early in the evening a record price for a Monet, $80.4 million, was set for one of the rarest of his waterlilies."

 

 

A sea of hands shot in the air when that painting, “Le Bassin aux Nymphéas,” which had been expected to sell for $36 million to $47 million, came up on the block. Among at least six would-be buyers, a blond woman in the front row bid tenaciously against several Christie’s representatives on the telephone with clients. When the price hit nearly $70 million, Christopher Burge, Christie’s honorary chairman in the United States and one of the evening’s two auctioneers, leaned over and said to the woman, “Take as long as you like.” The woman, identified as Tania Buckrell Pos of Arts & Management International, a London company, ended up winning the painting on behalf of an unknown client, and the salesroom burst into applause. The previous record for a Monet, $41.4 million for “The Railroad Bridge at Argenteuil,” was set last month at Christie's in New York.

 

“Le Bassin aux Nymphéas,” from 1919, a large horizontal work measuring more than 3 feet by 6 feet, is from a series of four that Monet signed and dated and that experts consider to be among the most important paintings from his late period. Unlike most of his late works, which remained unfinished at the time of his death in 1926, this series was sold by him."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


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pretty_ladyyyyy
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Posted on Fri, Mar 01, 2013 08:26

For the Love of Monet

 

 

 

 

The Summer, Poppy Field

 

 

 

 

Artist: Claude Monet

Completion Date: 1875

Style: Impressionism

Genre: landscape


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Posted on Sun, Feb 24, 2013 10:33

For the Love of Monet.....


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Posted on Sun, Feb 17, 2013 09:13

“Poppy Field in Argenteuil” by Monet 

 

 

 

 

“Poppy Field in Argenteuil,” Claude Monet – In this colorful oil painting, originally created in 1873, Claude Monet painted his wife and son strolling together among the poppies."


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Posted on Sat, Feb 16, 2013 12:03

English: La Grenouillère, painting of Claude Monet in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Magyar: Monet festménye a New York-i Metropolitan Múzeumban

1869

Metropolitan Museum of Art

painting of Monet, photo by Szilas in the Metropolitan


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pretty_ladyyyyy
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Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013 10:07

Pathway in Monet's Garden at Giverny


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Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013 09:38

Water lilies


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pretty_ladyyyyy
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Posted on Thu, Feb 14, 2013 09:20

Monet.....



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Posted on Sat, Feb 09, 2013 11:55

Dear Hoping4love2ooo, Thanks for your addition , lovely painting , well Monet was not a still life Artist , I love his landscapes.....the shadows.....the light.....Brush strokes.....

 

"Claude Monet's travels in the 1880's had refined his idea of a series. Monet began to direct his attention to a particular feature of the landscape so he could observe the subtle variations in color and illumination over the course of a day. He employed several canvases to capture a single view, switching from one to the next as the light changed.

He now sought to intensify this experience by reducing his options among the factors he could control -- subject, angle, position of easel -- to better comprehend the infinite modulation of tone as light passed over a surface. An effect might only last a moment; the slightest shift of the light source would alter colors, tonality, and the dimensions of the shadows.

 Monet Image Gallery

Monet had realized that light transformed the essential appearance of his subject. To understand it -- and to realize it on his canvas -- required that he address the subject again and again, if only to capture an instantaneous observation within the infinite range of visual possibilities.

In October 1890, Monet wrote to his friend the writer Gustave Geoffroy that the project he had undertaken was posing unexpected problems. The autumn sun set quickly, and he found that his brush and his eye were not swift enough to record what he had observed. Monet was painting stacks of wheat.

Two years earlier he had become intrigued with the way the local farmers stored their wheat in large mounds in the cleared fields outside Giverny. The rounded contour of the stack suggested to him a stable "envelope" that would be transformed by the fugitive effects of the sun's illumination as it moved east to west in the sky at a slightly different angle each day of the year.

As he worked on the Channel coast, on the Riviera, and in Britanny, Monet began to direct his attention to a particular feature of the landscape so he could observe the subtle variations in color and illumination over the course of a day. He employed several canvases to capture a single view, switching from one to the next as the light changed.

But the volatile weather kept Monet's subject vital and in flux, and he worked to the point of exhaustion. By early April, his energy was spent, and he returned to Giverny having painted 30 works over the course of his two campaigns. Cézanne visited Giverny that November, and he was astonished to see Monet's new work.

Always driven, Monet dismissed his own efforts, convinced he was in pursuit of something that would remain beyond his grasp. But the acuity of his observations and the intensity with which he engaged his subject prompted Cézanne to declare that Monet commanded "the only eye and the only hand that can follow a sunset in its every transparency and express its nuances on the canvas."

See how Claude Monet captures the essence of nature at various stages:

  • Claude Monet's Valley of the Creuse (Sunlight Effect) utilizes a purple palette, deep purple shadows and pale violet highlights. See Monet's early obsession with light and water in Valley of the Creuse (Sunlight Effect).
  • Claude Monet's Prairie a Giverny is a result of Monet curtailing his travel and observing the world around him. Check out Monet's Prairie a Giverny.
  • Haystacks: End of Summer by Claude Monet captures the beauty of the late August sun. Discover Monet's Haystacks: End of Summer.
  • Grainstacks in Bright Sun by Claude Monet uses dramatic colors to capture the natural perception of the light. Learn more about Claude Monet's Grainstacks in Bright Sun.
  • Stack of Wheat (Thaw, Sunset) by Claude Monet portrays the effects of the late winter thaw. Learn more about Monet's Stack of Wheat (Thaw, Sunset).
  • Claude Monet's Poplars, White and Yellow Effect suggests the stirring of a mild breeze through Monet's lively stroke. Check out Monet's Poplars, White and Yellow Effect.
  • Claude Monet's painting Four Trees illustrates his venture into alternative borders and uses of light. Learn more about Monet's painting, Four Trees.
  • Claude Monet's preoccupation with Grainstacks, Effect of Snow and Rain caused him to put all of his other paintings aside in order to capture the effects of winter. Learn about Claude Monet's obsessive focus on Grainstacks, Effect of Snow and Rain.
  • Poplars on the Banks of the River Epte by Claude Monet was almost never completed. Find out more behind Monet's painting, Poplars on the Banks of the River Epte.
  • Claude Monet's The Portal, Harmony in Brown was painted from his apartment window, giving a unique point of view to the work. See Monet's The Portal, Harmony in Brown.
  • Rouen Cathedral, Morning Sun, Blue Harmony by Claude Monet could only be truly appreciated by accepting the individual canvas as part of the whole series. Check out Rouen Cathedral, Morning Sun, Blue Harmony by Claude Monet.
  • Rouen Cathedral at the End of the Day (Sunlight Effect) was one of Claude Monet's more demanding works. See the fruit of Monet's labor in Rouen Cathedral at the End of the Day (Sunlight Effect)."

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Hoping4Love2000
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Posted on Thu, Feb 07, 2013 19:40

HI PRETTY_LADYYYY.. 

 

I'm new on your blog, but I have been watching and although  cannot honestly claim I "enjoy" Monet... (He is a bit too busy for me? I'm actually not certain WHAT it is.. but just not my "WOW-ism" for art... BUT.. )

 

I certainly know "incredible talent" when I view it....

 

Guess it is in comparison with a "rapper." Just isn't what I listen to. 

 

BUT,.. being you and Sunny, Don and others enjoy art in the painting realm.. I felt I might share a couple I truly enjoyed while in Chicago last year if you don't mind.

 

Grant you, These are horrible photos... (I was quick snapping photos as a guard came in and out... even though it said photos in certain sections WERE allowed!! YES! I was paranid!! LOL)

 

Ladies, gentlemen.. Tell me what your thoughts are on these photos?  Remind you, they are a photo of a photo on a phone! I did my best.. But I DID truly enjoy this art.. 

 

Thank you for sharing "something different."

 

Pretty Lady and others.. I could NOT believe.. I WAS IN AWE AT THE CHICAGO ART MUSEUM!!! 

 

It isn't the style of what you have displayed... 

 

But I receive your enthusiasm.... 

 

Your Monet was born in the late 1800's.. This photo was born..

 

1787 ... Still life with Fruit and Flowers

 

PAUL THEODORE VAN BRUSSEL~~

 

The COLORS are what drew me in... I am NOT a "fruit" kind of admirer.. 

 

But this was true beauty... esp.... from the 1700's!!! 

 

Pretty Lady... Are the colors of Monet more vibrant in person? Or is that style more "botchy and dull?"

 



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Posted on Thu, Feb 07, 2013 12:23

Painting Title:Pears and Grapes Oil Painting by Claude Monet
Original Artist:Claude Monet
Style:Impressionism Painting
Subject:Still Life Painting
Technique:Hand Painted Oil on Canvas

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Posted on Thu, Feb 07, 2013 11:40

MONET .....


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Posted on Thu, Feb 07, 2013 10:18

The Magpie (Monet)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The Magpie (French: La Pie) is an oil-on-canvas landscape painting by the French Impressionist Claude Monet, created during the winter of 1868–1869 near the commune of Étretat in Normandy. Monet's patron, Louis Joachim Gaudibert, helped arrange a house in Étretat for Monet's girlfriend Camille Doncieux and their newborn son, allowing Monet to paint in relative comfort, surrounded by his family.

Between 1867 and 1893, Monet and fellow Impressionists Alfred Sisley andCamille Pissarro painted hundreds of landscapes illustrating the natural effect of snow (effet de neige). Similar winter paintings of lesser quantity were produced by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Gustave Caillebotte, and Paul Gauguin. Art historians believe that a series of severe winters in France contributed to an increase in the number of winter landscapes produced by Impressionists.[1]

The Magpie is one of approximately 140 snowscapes produced by Monet. His first snowscape, A Cart on the Snowy Road at Honfleur, was painted sometime in either 1865 or 1867, followed by a notable series of snowscapes in the same year, beginning with the Road by Saint-Simeon Farm in WinterThe Magpiewas completed in 1869 and is Monet's largest winter painting. It was followed by The Red Cape (1869–1871), the only known winter painting featuring Camille Doncieux.[2]

The canvas of The Magpie depicts a solitary black magpie perched on a gate formed in a wattle fence, as the light of the sun shines upon freshly fallen snow creating blue shadows. The painting features one of the first examples of Monet's use of colored shadows, which would later become associated with the Impressionist movement. Monet and the Impressionists used colored shadows to represent the actual, changing conditions of light and shadow as seen in nature, challenging the academic convention of painting shadows black. This subjective theory of color perception was introduced to the art world through the works of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Michel Eugène Chevreul earlier in the century.

At the time, Monet's innovative use of light and color led to its rejection by the Paris Salon of 1869. Today, art historians classify The Magpie as one of Monet's best snowscape paintings.[3] The painting was privately held until the Musée d'Orsay acquired it in 1984; it is considered one of the most popular paintings in their permanent collection.


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Posted on Wed, Feb 06, 2013 09:19

Water Lily Pond and Bridge

 

 

 

 

 

Artist: Claude Monet

Completion Date: 1905

Style: Impressionism

Series: Water Lilies

Genre: flower painting


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Posted on Wed, Feb 06, 2013 07:06

Quoting Mtnsunny:

Amazing....each of Monet's pieces are priceless...literally.  I love the paintings you have selected Rooma.  Each holds a unique beauty, mostly of Landscapes and Seascapes...the French Countryside.



Dearest Lori ,

HE WAS A GENIUS , BEYOND WORD BEYOND ANY COMPREHENSION.....

MUCH LOVE.....Rooma

 

 

 

Claude Monet

Bridge over a Pool of Water Lilies, 1899

"Claude Monet (French, 1840-1926). Bridge over a Pool of Water Lilies, 1899. Oil on canvas. 36 1/2 x 29 in. (92.7 x 73.7 cm). H. O. Havermeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H.O. Havermeyer, 1929.© The Metropolitan Museum of Art"


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Posted on Wed, Feb 06, 2013 05:42

Springtime At Giverny

Claude Oscar Monet

 

Title:

 

Springtime At Giverny
       Painted by:Claude Oscar Monet
Location:Private Collection
Orientation:Landscape

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Posted on Tue, Feb 05, 2013 09:48

INCREDIBLE.....MAGICAL.....MONET.....LOVE IT.....


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Posted on Tue, Feb 05, 2013 05:37

Quoting worldmind:

Oh hello...so you like art aswell...then welcome to (re)visit my not sooo long back/formerly posted art-blog with both paintings and info/history etc posted on the art etc;

 

 

http://www.millionairematch.com/blogs/​blog_messages?blog_id=394686

 

 

 

Isnt that interesting indeed.



DEAR WORLDMINE.....

I DON'T LIKE ART....

I LOVE IT.....



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Posted on Mon, Feb 04, 2013 15:25

Oh hello...so you like art aswell...then welcome to (re)visit my not sooo long back/formerly posted art-blog with both paintings and info/history etc posted on the art etc;

 

 

http://www.millionairematch.com/blogs/blog_messages?blog_id=394686

 

 

 

Isnt that interesting indeed.



by Worldmind

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Posted on Mon, Feb 04, 2013 13:21

Quoting DONTFITMOLD:

Paul Gauguin's "Where do we come from? What are we? Whereare we going?" is a huge painting that is presented in the Boston Museum of artis one of my favorite Meaningful artworks. I use it on my desktop background...awesome !!!



Dear DONTFITMOLD thanks for your addition.....beautiful.....

ART MAKES THE SPIRIT ALIVE.....I LOVE IT.....

Rooma.....



WE ARE ALL.....BUT.....JUST SPIRITUAL BEINGS.....

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