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For Equine lovers and people interested in horses Sort by:
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Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 21:17

Some people get lucky....


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MorningAngel
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Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 08:56

Randy I think my first pony cost my mother $20 back in '73. When I was 15 I had my first horse and I wish someone had explained costs to me back then. I was broken hearted when I had to sell her because I simply couldn't afford the upkeep costs by the time I was 17. I think it was one vet bill that made it very clear just how unprepared I was financially to care for a horse. Thanks for putting it in black and white for others. It's a great responsiblity and can really cut into a pocketbook. Okay I just got smarter years later and simply dated those who owned stables of horses who would allow me free access to riding them. *Grins* Of course that still cost.. but hey I can still muck stalls like a pro and what's a little hard work and upkeep for the thrill of a good ride. My children want to learn how to ride horses, but when all is said and done I don't think I'd own my own horse at this stage in the game. Friends of mine that ride often tend to share ownership. This can really work out well for everyone.


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Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 08:15

In Iowa you can buy a kid broke, no papers, 7 to 10 year old horse for 2000 and under. $5000 dollars would buy you a cutting or roping horse here. But then again a bale of hay here is around $2.50 Just depends on where you live


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Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 07:41

"I agree with you as to those who think they are saving horses. There are plenty of legal operations that do this. I have seen way too many low income people, with good intentions; think it is their right to save a horse, or animal of any kind, when they cannot even take care of themselves. They are the worst of caretakers and the animals, even with all that "love" are worse off in their hands than being put down. Many times these caretakers are begging for others to take care of them, and their animals. Very often, it is the animals who suffer the most in these situations. " I only wish you both had the chance to visit our farm or know us as people. It really hurts that people can throw such accusations around not knowing who they are talking about. We DO work with a LEGAL operation. We foster 3 horses during rehabilitation under the care and watchful eye of both a vet and the president of the US Equine Rescue League! (Jennifer Hack, who is a close friend and neighbor of ours) Her facility is full and she asked if we could help. We take care of ourselves and our animals better than most. I have been unemployed for 2 months. Prior to that I was a medical device rep who averaged $80k a year. I have never asked or begged for money. I asked for some heartfelt prayers to help us get a better facility. The situation with us losing our farm has nothing to do with the rescues! If you both are such equine lovers, then know the situation before you judge someone and their ability to care for themselves and animals. Ask me! I'd love to share my story and answer any questions you may have or better yet contact the US Equine Rescue League yourself and ask if we are qualified to foster horses. Your comments really hurt. I wish you would get to know me maybe you'd feel differently.


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Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 07:24

Thank you for your insightful comments. I only wish that every person who was considering buying a horse had the chance to read this blog. I have owned and cared for several horses and am fully aware of the time and money commitment it takes. You are right in saying that it is better to put a horse down than let it suffer in pain or have its spirit broken by being penned up. The rescues I have chosen to take in needed help. Because the market for horses has crashed there are many that have no where to go. I work with a reputable rescue organization the US Equine Rescue League. They pay for the medical and feed bills for all the horses that are fostered during their rehabilitation period. I know I can't save them all, but those that I can, I will. All horses that go through the League must be gelded before adoption and we have already made arrangements for both the stud colt and the stallion to be gelded. They are healthy and good natured and should make someone a great companion. It is not my decision whether to put down a horse or not, but even if every one that came in had to be put down I would still give them their last days in happiness and trust and be by their side as they pass. Please don't judge my situation as irresponsible. People who love animals understand and accept that some can't be saved and it is better for them to die than live a life of pain and misery. If you fully understood my situation, I don't think you would be so upset. I would like the chance to share with you. With Love Jennifer

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Queenofyourdreams
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Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2007 07:15

Great thoughts here on taking on the responsibilites of owning a horse, Horse whisperer! However, most of your prices are way to low. You can triple the figures and prices of all of what you mentioned in this area. I doubt if you can find a safe or decent horse here for less than $5,000. Board for a horse starts at the lower end at $400 and at the upper level barns $800 a month, without additional horse training or riding lessons. When I was in Wellington, (Palm Beach Florida) the average decent horse was $20,000 and the board was from $500 a month to over $1000, again without any horse training (which most horses need) or riding instruction! (which all riders need) I am not sure what riding instructions or horse training costs are in your area are, but I charge $80 a session to teach a rider and $60 a session to ride a clients horse. In Florida, I charged more. Many of the horse people I am around would be insulted if we called them a cowboy or cowgirl. They are equestrians... It is best for most people not to keep a horse at their home. They are not country people raised with animals like you and I. They are clueless and need an experienced professional to take care of and manage the safety of the animals in their care. Most of the professional barns and public stables manage and organize the vets, farriers, transportation, and so on for the owners. They protect the welfare of the horses and the "amateur" horse owner. There is not much land left to turn horses out in fields or pastures as there used to be. Maybe where you are there is, but in most locations most of the land, and the riding trails have been taken over with developments and suburbs. Many horses have learned to adjust to a small turn out, in a very small field, (if they are lucky) while others are only turned out for an hour a day. Most "public" stables do not turn horses out together anymore. I am not saying this is what nature intended, or what I like, but many of these horses live productive and happy lives. Those who compete on the international level seldom let their valuable horse "run loose". They have grooms lead them around for exercise. There are dressage riders who never turn their horses out and instead ride them for 20 mins. twice a day. Again, not what I would desire or want to do, but I am also not a world champion. While I was on the show circuit in Wellington the average horse was $500,000 and many of the people had one horse for each division they showed in. It was the land of the rich and famous and that is how they live. It was an awakening for me! Horses are a luxury sport and most people do not know this until they get involved. Personally, I would suggest that the average person who wants a horse, or whose children want one, should go to a local riding stable and take lessons from a professional. That way they will know if a horse is really what they want or need. Horses require lots of hard pysical work, and a large investment in cash, to maintain and take care of. The biggest expenses come after the horse is purchased. Most people do not know this. And yes, you and I were born to be free. But horses, like humans, learn to adapt to different living situations. I know of many city people who would not survive one day in the country. I can understand as the thought of living in a city scares me! God Bless the horses in our lives!

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